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INTERNATIONAL 



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PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 




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Paris, Wednesday, March 30, 1994' 



No. 34,549 


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*U.K. Yields 
In EU Feud, 
Opening Way 
To Expansion 

Backbenchers Attack 
Major for ' Compromise ’ 
In Dispute on Voting 

By John Damton 

JVrw York rimer Service 

LONDON — Britain yielded Tuesday in a 
bitter dispute over voting rights in the Europe- 
an Union, paving the way for the admission of 
three Scandinavian countries and Austria next 
January. \ 

Although it claimed to have won a “compro- 
mise” from the other countries in finally set- 
tling the dispute over voting procedures, the 
government was attacked in the House of Com- 
mons by its own backbenchers, as well as the 
opposition, for picking a needless fight with its 


into a 




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htmanating “dimbdowiL* 

Amid reports of a divisive cabinet meeting 
Tuesday mooting, the episode was seen by 
commentators as another setback for Prime 
Minister John Major. Only a week- ago, he was 


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rather see the enlargement of the EU delayed 
than give in cm what he said was an issue of 
principle. 

Members of Parliament gasped Tuesday as 
Tony Marlow, a maverick Conservative, rose to 
charge that Mr. Major had “no authority, credi- 
bility or identifiable policy in this vital area,” 
and said he should “stand aside and way 
for somebody else who can provide the party 
and the country with direction and leadership” 

Mr. Major locked shaken by the tirade, 
which marked the first time anyone could re- 
member that a Conservative had faced a leader 
of his party in the House and advised him to 
resign. Opposition Labor members cheered for 
Mr. Mariow to be given more rime to speak. 

The dispute that held up enlargement of the 
union was on the surface an arcane dispute over 
how many votes would be needed for a minor- 
ity of EU countries to be able to block decisions 
of the majority once tbefour newmembers join. 

But it dredged up fears that the union, which 
began as a six -member trading Woe is 1957, 
had grown into a rightly knit political and 
economic colossus whose laws rad regulations 
reach deep into the lives of its member states. 

Nowhere are these fears felt more strongly 
than in Britain, where the Conservative Party is 
faffing under the ^pdl of its right wmg. The so- 
called “Euroskepdcs,” under the spiritual lead- 
ership of Mr. Major’s predecessor, Lady 
Thatcher, now in the Hoose of Lords, argue 
fervently that British sovereignty is being gob- 
bled up by a federal superstate in Brussels. 

In toe new set- op, if Austria, Sweden, Nor- 
way and Finland jam, the total votes will rise to 
90. Ten countries wanted the blocking minority 
to rise proportionately to 27, but Britain ana _ 
Spain wanted it to remain at 23. As firings 
stand, a decision can be blocked by two large 
states and a snail state. Under the new arrange- 
ment, it would take three large states or two 
large ones and two or more small ones. 

Britain defended the position in rounds of 
mlks m Brussels and elsewhere and went down 
to the wire in negotiations in Greece this week- 
end. As part Of a package that was presented to 
the Commons today, Mr. Major said that virile 
27 votes would be required to block a decision, 
23 would be enough far a “reasonable” delay. 

The length of the delay had not been speci- 
fied. 



Youths sheltering with Johannesburg policemen after reports of sniper fire raised tensions Tuesday, a day aftwTdMTprolSL* 

South Africans Delay Peace Talks 


By Paul Taylor 

Washington Post Savior 

JOHANNESBURG — South Africa’s pre- 
election tensions rose several more degrees 
Tuesday as a proposed meeting of Zulu, ANC 
and government leaders to defuse political 
violence was postponed and the head of an 
anti-election party predicted war if the voting 
itself was not delayed. 

King Goodwill Zweh'firini of the Zulus 
asked for a postponement of a meeting that 
had been hastily arranged following gun bat- 
tles Monday in which at least 53 people were 
killed and hundreds were wounded when 
armed Zulus who oppose the elections 
marched into Johannesburg’s central busi- 
ness district and mcountered what appeared 
to be sniper fire. 

The king said it would be in a pprop ri ate to 
hold the talks, scheduled to have started 


Wednesday, before the victims of the carnage 
had been buried. Negotiators said they ex- 
pected to be able to reschedule the meeting 
for the week after Easter. It is to be attended 
by King Goodwill; President Frederik W. de 
Klerk, the African National Congress presi- 
dent, Nelson Mandela; and the Zulu-domi- 
nated Inkatha Freedom Party chairman. 
Chief Mangosuthu ButhdezL 

Chief Buthelezi blamed the ANC for the 
killings and made dear his intention to treat 
the dead as martyrs in his anti-election cam- 
paign. He called for a nationwide Zulu day of 
mourning on April 27, in the middle of the 
three-day election period. 

He also warned that the massacre at Shell 
House, the ANC national headquarters 
building, “shows that we have now entered a 
final struggle to the finish between the ANC 


and the Zulu nation unless there is an exten- 
.sion of the voting date deadline.” 

- Despite the hardening of political positions 
after one of the worst days of violence in 
Smith Africa's modern history, the officials 
charged with supervising and running the 
election, the Transitional Executive Council 
and the Independent Electoral Commission 

— pressed ahead with steps to preserve the 
election date and assure free political activity. 

The council adopted a resolution that 
would give South African Defense Forces 
greater powers to maintain order in the black 
homeland of KwaZulu and its surrounding 
province of Natal, where Zulu-based resis- 
tance to the ejection has contributed to a 
record 266 political deaths this month. 

The chairman of the council, Johan 
Kriegler, said he saw no reason, despite riang 

See SUMMIT, Page 6 


Ally Challenges 

Berlusconi Over 
Forming Cabinet 


U.S* Hints at Alternatives in China Rift 


Compiled by Our Suff From Dispatches 

WASHINGTON — Selectively withdrawing 
U.S. trade benefits to Chinese state-owned en- 
terprises instead of broader sanctions could be 
a way to address China's absence of progress on 
human rights issues, Winston Lord, the assis- 
tant US. secretary of state, said Tuesday. 

Mr. Lord said a targeted withdrawal of the 
benefits, known as most-favored-nation status, 
would be aimed at lessening the impact of the 
action on U.S. business and other “innocent 
bystanders,” such as Hong Kong and Taiwan. 

Many US. businesses are worried that with- 
drawing the preferential trade status would ruin 
ties with one of the world’s largest and fastest- 
growing markets. 

UJS. officials also have expressed concerns 
that Prcrident Bill Clinton may have boxed 
himself into a eraser by tying the status so 
directly to human rights, and have urged that in 
the future there be multiyear extension of the 
deal and no rights conditions. Mr. Lord echoed 
that sentiment Tuesday. 

“I think there’s an overwhelming view in the 


Congress, as there is in the executive branch, 
that it would be much preferable to base a 
broader foundation for our relations and not 
have so much weight put on this annual de- 
bate,” he said. 

He also said dissension within the Clinton 
administration and between the White House 
and Congress was undermining its ability to 
strike an agreement with China an rights issues. 

“There ought to be more unity within the 
government,* he said. 

Withdrawing file status only from Chinese 
state-owned enterprises in the absence of pro- 
gress on rights, trade and nuclear proliferation 
issues was part of a biH passed by Congress in 


1992 that was vetoed by President George 
Bush. 

The concept was included again in widely 
supported legislation that was introduced in 
Congress last year. But congressional action 
was preempted by President Clinton's derision 
to issue an executive order insisting China 
make overall significant progress an rights or 
risk losing most-favored-nation status when it 
comes up for renewal on June 3. 

“In principle it’s a good theory and one 
should be looking at it,” Mr. Lord said. 

He said the United States and China were 
working quietly on resolving the human rights 
impasse. (Rearers, Bloomberg, AFP) 


By Alan Cowell 

New York Tima Service 

ROME — Less than a day after Italy’s right- 
ist alliance, led by the media tycoon SOvio 
Berlusconi, surged to victory in watershed na- 
tional elections, a power struggle within the 
affiance’s ranks raised questions Tuesday about 
its ability to form a stable government. 

At the same time, some commentators began 
to express concern that the strong showing by 
the neofascist National Alliance would bring a 
resurgence of extremism 51 years after the fall 
of fascism in 1943. ___ 

When the neofasdst leader Gianfranco Fini 
hailed about 2J)00 supporters in Rome's Piazza 
del Popolo early Tuesday, hundreds of youths 
in the crowd gave straight-armed Fascist sa- 
lutes and chanted “Duce, Duce” — the rallying 
cry of the late dictator Benito Mussolini. 

Ever since the first computer projections 

Ingredients that made Berinscom rich helped 

Imn to sDccess in pofitics. • Rightists hoM ab- 
solute majority ™ tower house. Page 6L 

emerged late Monday night, Mr. Berlusconi — 
whose party polled the highest percentage of 
the rightist vote, with around 20 percent of the 
ballots — has been talking as if the man tle of 
power should naturally fall to his 3-month-dd 
Forza Italia party. 

A second member of the alliance, Mr. Fini, 
the neofasdst leader, whose party took about 
12 percent of the overall vote, has said he would 
support a bid by Mr. Berlusconi for the prime 
monster’s job. 

By a tradition that is not always observed 
after Italian elections, the leader of the biggest 
party is usually asked to form a new govern- 
ment. 

However, since Monday night, the leader of 
the third party on the right, the Northern 
League separatist Umberto Bossi, has said be 
would not support Mr. Berlusconi as prime 
minister because his huge business interests in 
television, supermarkets, advertising and pub- 
lishing were in conflict with the national inter- 
est 

The dispute sharpened further Tuesday with 
a Northern League statement demanding that it 
should lead the country “in the new phase of 
the great, peaceful federalist revolution.” 

“The Italian people expect that the Northern 
League should xe entrusted with the role Of the 
governing elite,” d said. The statement drew no 
immediate response from Mr. Berlusconi, who 
had responded to earlier threats by Mr. Bossi to 
pull out of the alliance by calling him a traitor. 

“The parties that campaigned with us must 
form a government with us,” he said. “Any- 
thing else would be high treason.” 

Mr. Fini, the neofasdst leader, said he would 
□ever accept a prime minister from the Norths 

personality divisions between the two^paities. 

In what seemed a slight softening of his 
position Tuesday night, Mr. Bossi said in Mi- 
lan: “I think we’ll manage to have a govern- 
ment with the parties chosen by the voters.” But 
he left open the questions of its composition 
and leadership. 


The league polled only 8 percent of the bal- 
lots, bat, under Italy’s new voting system mix- 
ing direct and proportional ballots, the percent- 
age left Mr. Bossi's followers claiming to have 
taken 106 seats in the lower house — --twice its 
share in the previous Parliament anri_mnre than 
enough 1 to scuttle the rightist parliamentary 
ity. 

analysts took (he league’s hard-nosed 
position as the start of bitter and protracted 
negotiations in the traditional Italian manner 
on the formation of a new government after the 
new Parliament convenes for the first time to 
elect its two speakers on April 15. 

“Behind the great change, there was to be 
seen the usual Italian, political uncertainty, 
unstable if not ungovernable, seeking rally 
cease-fires or revenge," said MarceDor Sragi, a 
columnist for La Stamp a. Mr. Berlusconi and 
Mr. Fini met in Rome without Mr. Bossi on 
Tuesday to begin negotiations for a coalition. 
“We spoke of everything, including Bossi," Mr. 
Fini said. 

It is by no means dear how the supporters of 
the Nothera League's chief would react to a 
pullout from the coalition that would leave 
them isolated from the center of power in 
Rome. 

The rightist landslide in the lower house, 
more used to razor-thin majorities, seemed to 
reflect the rage of many Italians toward the 
disgraced Christian Democrats and their allies 

See ITALY, Page 6 



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Remake Plan for Balkans: 
Urgent, Risky, Two-Faced 

By John Pomfret 

Washington Poet Service 

K ZAGREB, Croatia— Three years after the 

shots were fired that triggered two wars m the 
Balkans and the worst atrocities m EnJOpc 
since World War H, a solution is emerging from 
the psh** 8 of what used to be Yugoslavia. 

Created in Washington, Moscow, Geneva 
and the capitals of Serbia, Croatia and Bosnia, 
the plraarms to remake the region. 

■ The peace process, restarted after the reb. -> 
killing of 68 people in Sarajevo’s open-air mar- 


NEWS ANALYSIS 








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ket and a NATO threat to use force mad the 
Bosnian capital, has moved forward with re- 
markable speed compared with the negotia- 
tions that sputtered along for 
va. But, according to one diplomat, it has a 
limited shelf life.” , , . __ 

According to diplomats involved m the pro- 
cess, theama^ Balkans peace 
allow the Serbs, who have t^^amed foe 
instigating the recent wars m Bammm un- 
afo/to^mtichQftlw 
Spy, 72 percent of the country. It would 
bre2y ignore demands by the Bosnian Mus- 
ImstLttireWmated 1 
from their homes be permitted to return, the 

^StoTthey said, the Scrbs^^^ 
hand over the 27 percent of naghbontigUO' 
aria that they have held since the war b^an m 

Newsstand Price s^. 

Andorra— -9*00 PP 

Antilles D & FF Rtals 

Camenxxi.-1.400CFA JO FF 

Egypt — E.P.5Q0Q Arabia JMOR- 

France .9.00 FF Senegal 

Gabon 960 C FA Spain. 

Greece. -300 Dr- Tunisia 

Ivory Coast .1.120 CFA Turks* 

SSSctVS 


early 1991. They have since declared an inde- 
pendent “Republic of the Serb Krajina" there. 

However the peace process turns out, it is a 
watershed for the Umted States and Russia. 
Diplomats Iran both cations said none of the 
recent success could have occurred without 
UJS.-Russian teamwork. 

Die Joint effort was continuing Tuesday as 
Peter W. Galbraith, the U.S. ambassador to 
Croatia, joined a Russian envoy, Vi tali L Chur- 
kin, at asecond round of talks m Zagreb aimed 
at carrying out an enduring cease-fee in Cro- 
atia. 

The new peace scheme mixes idealism and 
najpolitik. In some areas, like Bosnia, it seems 
to reward the use of force. In others, diplomats 
have vowed, the results of force will k rolled 
back. While one part of the accord seeks to 
plant seeds of multicultuialism and pluralism, 
the other essentially ratifies a harvest of ultra- 
nationalism and “ethnic deansing." 

The two-raced nature of the plan is in some 
ways inevitable, given the international com- 
munity’s slow and often co ntra dictory re- 


President Slobodan Milosevic of Serbia, be- 
lieved to be the architect of the wars in Croatia 
and Bosnia, is the key to the emerging plan. If 
he agrees to sacrifice Serb-held Croatia for a 
large piece of Bosnia, then international eco- 
nomic sanctions would be eased and Mr. Milo- 
sevic could find himself leading a greatly ex- 
panded state. 

To sweeten the pot for file Serbs, Mr. Gal- 
braith toid their leaders over the weekend that 
the United States would hdp guarantee Serb 
rights in Croatia should they accept rule from 
file Croatian government in Zagreb. Tins assur- 
ance merited a significant shift in UJ3. policy 
toward engaging rebel Serbs in Croatia. 

Next in importance is Franjo TudjmaiL, pres- 
ident of Croatia. Diplomats said the United 
States and Russia will bade his attempt to 


j makes a series of painful moves at home. 
Mr. Turman has fulfilled some require- 
ments in abandoning his plan to. carve out a 

See BOSNIA, P&ge 6 


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Om Y«m K«|/A*Me 

A Sooth Korean border 
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towered the tone. Page 6. 

Mexican Parly 
Picks Candidate 

Mexico's governing party chose Ernesto 
Zedillo Ponce de Leon, a Yale-trained 
economist and forma education minister, 
as its candidate in die August presidential 
election. He succeeds Luis Donaldo Colo- 
sio, who was killed last week. (Page 7) 


Trib lnde> 



The DoHar 


TueaOAPM 


ptydttBi 


DM 

1.6727 

1.6722 

Pound 

1405 

1.4961 

Yen 

103.125 

104JJ5 


FF 


5.723 


5.712 


Tokyo’s Trade Cure Falls Short, U.S. Says 


Compiled by Ow Staff From Dispaicke 

WASHINGTON — Mickey Kan tor. the 
U.S. trade representative, poured cold water 
Tuesday on Japan's latest plan to open its 
markets to imports, calling it a “half- finished 
work” that did not meet President Bill Clinton's 
concerns. 

“The plan does not represent concrete steps," 
Mi. Kantor said. As a result, he said, the United 
States will not reopen the trade talks soon with 
J apan. The talks aided on Feb. 11, when Mr. 
Clinton and Prime Minuter Morihiro Ho- 
sokawa failed to agree on how best to cut 
Japan's $131 billion annual surplus. 

Mr. Kantor’ s comments, although they did 
not constitute a categorical rgection, had an 
mwwdiatft effect on financial markets already 
made jittery by rising interest rates. 

The Dow Jones industrial average of blue- 
chip U.S. stocks plunged after be spoke, to a 
loss of more than 60 pom Is on the day. The 
dollar weakened against the yen, doting at 
103.125 yen, as a result of renewed fear of 
heightened trade tensions. The dollar had been 


trading at 103.60 yen before Mr. Kantor spoke, 
and was near 106.50 yen last week 
Despite his reservations, Mr. Kantor said, 
“We're not discouraged," and added: “Our 
doer is opened and we are prepared to work 
with our ally with this." 

Japan's government said Tuesday that it 
would spend the next three months on steps to 
cut bureaucratic red tape in 11 key areas where 
foreign companies say tt is too difficult to otter 
the market, such as insurance, retailing, phar- 
maceuticals and food. But Japan said it would 
not decide until June on the specifics of bring- 
ing product regulations and s tandar ds more m 
line with world norms. 

Plans should be ready by June to expand 
public works spending ana to extend a $56 
billion tax cut past fins year, Japan said. Wash- 
ington has been demanded both steps in the 
belief that they would perk up Japan’s economy 
and bolster purchases of foreign goods. 

The Japanese proposal represents a slight 
i m p ro vement in the area of government pro- 
curement, Mr. Kantor said. But he added that 


the U.S. position was that there was no progress 
in any other of the key areas. 

Caffing the package a “big disappointment," 
Michael Hartnett, an economist at Schroders 
Securities in Tokyo, said: “The reason the sur- 
plus is so high is because of trade restrictions. 
That's what the package was meant to attack, 
and it has failed to attack that.” 

“The problem with Japan has not been regu- 
lation on the books,” said Alan Tondson, re- 
search director of the Economic Strategy Insti- 
tute in Washington. “It's the informal business 
practices that are not on the books.” 

Japanese officials sought to play up the sig- 
nificance of the package. Mr. Hosokawa said it 
was a first step toward increased liberalization 
of Japan’s markets. “These measures identify 
the path of such economic reform,” he said. 

The government also said it would agree to 
U.S. demands to strengthen the investigative 
powers of Japan's Fair Trade Commission by 
procuring that Japan's Anti-Monopoly Law 
would be “strictly enforced." 

(Bloomberg AP) 


Masters and Johnson: Old but Still at It 


By Martha Sherrill 

Washington Pott Service 

WASHINGTON — They were not carry- 
ing stopwatches and thermometers or wear- 
ing white kb coats, but no two people have 
ever talked so candidly about sex as much as 
Masters and Johnson and continued to be so 
hopelessly unsexy. 

At the Four Seasons Hotel, they entered 
the lounge looking Kke two senior citizens in 
desperate need of a Caribbean cruise. Di- 
vorced after 21 years of study and research 
and experimentation, they have jnst finished 
collaborating on a gigantic bode, “Heterosex- 
uality.” It is not an acad e mic text for die- 
hards like them, but a guide for your average 
sexually curious person. 

Vir ginia E. Johnson, 69, carefully sat down 
and placed her tiny Bottega Veneta handbag 
on her kp, a rather telling position perhaps to 
Sgmund Freud. She is likable, and a little 
secluded emotionally. She did not talk in 
toms of the subconkaons or dark lingering 
monsters, but used words like “response" and 
“impulse” and then, finally, refreshingly, 
something as unmedical as “intimacy.” 


“There was a rush to make sex recreational, 
to make it fun and games,” Mrs. Johnson said 
of the ’60s and 70s. “And ignoring the things 
that make sexual response occur, things that 
deepen a relationship, that give it color and 
endurance.” 

Her forma 1 husband, Dr. William H. Mas- 
ters, 78, found a chair betide ha. He is bald, 
seemed to have trouble malting eye contact 
and kept his lips pursed so firmly that they 
appeared to have vanished. It was dear he felt 
misunderstood. 

Some people still think of him carrying his 
clipboard and peering through a two-way 
mirror as couple made love in his kb. When 
his first book, “Human Sexual Response," 
was published in 1966, critics complained it 
was too dmical, too much about bodies and 
physiology and not enough about love and 
feelings. 

“The reason for our laboratory was to 
study the normal, in order to undostand the 
dysfunctional,” he said a little defensively. 

A younger, livelier fellow in blue pinstripes 
named Dr. Robert Kolodny — yet another 
co-author — kept chiming in. A physician 
who has worked at the Masters ft Johnson 


Institute in $l Louis for 25 years, he is 
infinitely more n muting and accessible than 
his forma teachers and mentors, but Ik suf- 
fers from the nagging problem of not being 
nearly as famous. 

“People wanted Dr. Masters to write about 
the psychology of love right off the bat," Dr. 
Kolodny said, “but it’s a little like going into 
a French restaurant and saying, “Hey, 
where’s the Chinese food? ” 

“Ahhh," Mrs. Johnson interrupted. “Bob, 
I think a better analogy would be going into 
cardiac surgery and saying, “Where’s the ro- 
mance, the valentines, the hearts and flow- 
ers? ” 

Dr. Kolodny brought Ms wife along, and 
Dr. Masters’s new wife was there as well, all 
meringued blond hair and Chanelish suit 

In a recent interview with The New York 
Times, Mrs. Johnson intimated that it wasn't 
so much a sex problem that caused their 
divorce last year, but that Dr. Masters 
seemed devoted to watching sports on televi- 
sion. 

Dr. Masters rubbed the arm of his rfiai> 

See SEX, Page 2 


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Behind EU Settlement, a Flexing of German Muscle 


By Craig R. Whitney 

New York Times Service 

LONDON — Diplomats say that vig- 
orous German diplomacy helped nurture 
a compromise about voting rights in the 
European Union that enabled all 12 ex- 
isting members, including Britain, to 
agree to terms for the admission of the 
Nordic states and Austria next year. 

But Germany’s willingness to use mus- 
cle to advance its interests has left some 
French officials feeling distinctly uneasy 
about their big neighbor, while their Brit- 
ish counterparts feel somewhat let down 

nnse on voting rights* within the 12-na- 
tion bloc that was finally accepted Tues- 
day by Britain. 

French misgivings that the European 
Union would come under even greater 
German sway with the addition of the 
four new mem bos next year, and possi- 
bly Hungary, Poland and the Cz e ch Re- 
public around the turn of the century, are 
not shared in London, British officials 
say. 

“We don’t have to worry that the cen- 
ter of gravity will shift eastward,” a Brit- 
ish official said. 

Bat Foreign Secretary Douglas Hurd 
told Par liamen t this week that Britan 
bad thought the Germans supported its 
position on voting procedures, until 
B onn began pushing a compromise last 
week. 


Germany, which will take over the six- 
month presidency of the Union on July 1, 
has dominated, the Greek presidency that 
began Jan. 1, with Foreign Minister 
Klaus Kinkd playing the key role in 
brokering terms for the admission of Fin- 
land, Sweden, Norway and Austria, ac- 
cording to many diplomats. 

Mr."fcinkd, a former intelligence chief 
who often uses vigorous Swabian rusti- 

The British say they 
do not share French 
misgivings that the 
EU will come under 
even greater German 
sway with the addition 
of new. members. 

risq ra to make forceful points, virtually 
took over the chair at the key meetings in 
Brussels where diplomats say the terms 
for Norway’s entry were thrashed out in 
rigorous negotiations with fyain about 
fishing quotas in Norwegian North Sea 
waters. 

The French Ambassador to Bonn, 
Francois Scheer, told German journalists 
later that Mr. Kinkel bad shocked some 
of his colleagues by telling the Spaniards 


and others that Germany would, break 
their backs if they did not compromise — 
languag e Mr. Kmkd and bis aides later 
insisted he never used. 

Kit the German foreign minister has 
repeatedly and publicly aid that the Eu- 
ropean Union needed balance from 
wealthy Northern European countries to 
etthef 


recent 

like 


offset the financial drain of 
additions from Southern _ 

Spain, Portugal and Greece. 

France is sensitive about this, Iks be- 
cause it considers itself as a Mediterra- 
nean country than because it has 
claimed, since 1957, to lead the move- 
ment toward closer European unity, with 
Germany as a key, but definitely junior, 
partner. 

“It is not just the French who have 
difficulty accepting the new postion of 
Germany,” Mr. Scheer told German 
journalists. Mr. Kmkd, incensed, called 
the French ambassador to the Foreign 
Ministry for an explanation, and the tem- 
pest soon passed. 

But Preadeat Francois Mitterrand lat- 
ex went out of bis way to receive Mr. 
Scheer in Paris, and the French daily Le 
Monde said that the French ambassador 
had been right. 

“The character of Franco-German re- 
lations has profoundly changed since 
unification, in style as well as content,” 
the newspaper said. 

Both Fiance and Britain, when Marga- 


ret Thatcher was prime minister, tried to 
delay German unification in 1990, but 
her successor, John Major, has cultivated 
a good relationship with Chancellor Hel- 
mut KohL 

Mr. Major told the House of Com- 
mons on Tuesday that he. too, hoped that 
Poland, Hungary and the Czech Repub- 
lic would join the European Union near 
the turn of the century. 

The Germans hope that inch 
them would help anchor economic 
political stability in the tumultuous terri- 
tory that begins at Germany's eastern 
border, but some observers in France 
fear that it would push their country 
further toward the s' defines of a union it 
has always hoped to dominate. 

Britain insisted after terms for Nor- 
way, Finland, Sweden and Austria were 
worked out that the number of weighted 
votes required to block European Union- 
wide decisions should stay at 23 instead 
of rising to 27 when four new members 
come in and raise the total number of 
votes from 76 to 90. 

Larger countries like Germany, Britain 
and France have 10 votes and small ones 
like Denmark and Ireland have three 
each, so what Britain wanted was to en- 
able two larger countries and one smaller 
one to continue to be able to block Eu- 
rope-wide measures they felt were not in 
their interests. 

Spain, which has eight votes, also toed: 


this stand at first but later accepted a 
Greek compromise that decisions object- 
ed to by countries with a total of 23 votes 
should be delayed for a “reasonable peri- 
od” and then approved unless there was a 
total of 27 votes against them. 

Thai left the British on the spot. 

“Britain against Europe cannot in our 
saao- moments be our rallying ay,” For- 
eign Secretary Douglas Hurd said Iasi 
week before going off to negotiate the 
final co mpr o mi se in Greece over the 
weekend. 

The Germans kept up the pressure on 
the British, and Spanish governments tc 
endorse the compromise by Tuesday, tc 
meet deadlines set by the European Par- 
liament for ratification of the accession 
agreements. 

“The formula we found over the week- 
end should be acceptable to Great Brit- 
ain and Spain,” Mr. Kmkd said. “A 
further delay in reaching agreement 
would block the accession of Sweden. 
Norway, Finland and Austria to the Eu- 
ropean Union. The future development 
of the European Union is at stake.” 

Mr. Major, who did not say whether he 
found such statements helpful in British- 
internal political debate, told Parliament: 
on Tuesday that all other countries 
agreed that the whole voting system 
should be reviewed in 1996, and that the 
British government had therefore accept- 
ed the compromise as wdL 


WORLD BRIEFS 


Bonn Calls 
For Inquiry 
Into Leader 
Of Rightists 

The Associated Press 

BONN — Prosecutors opened 
an investigation Tuesday of a right- 
ist political leader who accused the 
head of Germany’s Jewish commu- 
nity of provoking anti-Semitism. 

Franz SchOnhuber, bead of the 
Republican Party, could face 
charges of incitement of hatred, 
slander and defamation for his 
c omm ents about IgnaJz Bubis of 
the Central Council of Jews in Ger- 
many. 

The inquiry carmot formally be- 
gin until Mr. Schdnhuber’s parlia- 
mentary immunit y is lifted, said 
Gerhard Zierl spokesman for the 
Justice Ministry m the state of Ba- 
varia. Mr. Scfcbnhuber is a member 
of the European Parliament. 

Mr. Schdohuber provoked wide- 


Mr. Bubis was “one of those 
most responsible for provoking 
anti-S emitism. " He made tiie com- 
ment two days after a synagogue in 
northern Germany was fire- 
bombed. 

Most of the major political par- 
ties demanded that Mr. ScbOn- 
huber be put on trial for the com- 
ment. 

“He brings shame on Bavaria 
and must be countered with all le- 
gal force," said the Bavarian gover- 
nor, Edmund Stoiber. 

Many established politicians 
would tike to cripple Mr. Schfln- 
huber’s party to assure that it does 
no! get the 5 percent of the vote 
needed to rater the federal parlia- 
ment in Oct. 16 elections. Mr. 
Sch&nhuber’s base is Bavaria. 

Mr. SchOnhuber sued Mr. Bubis 
for slander March 4 afterMr. Bubis 
said he was one of the intellectual 
authors behind neo-Nazi violence. 
Mr. Bubis repeated his accusation 
Saturday, the day after the Idbeck 
synagogue was firebombed. Prose- 
cutors suspect rightist extremists in 
the attack. 

At a party rally Sunday, Mr. 
SchOnhuber denied any role in the 
violence: He claimed ms party was 
bong victimized by the Jewish 
leader. 

The Republicans have seats in 
state and local legislatures and re- 
ceive lucrative state subsidies. Last 
week, they won approval to open a 
research organization in Boon with 
taxpayers’ money. 

Mr. SchOnhuber, a 70-year-old 
former Waffen SS sergeant, says he 
is not a Nazi but stands fra a strong 
independent Germany. 



Turk Leader 
Urges Bloc 
To Counter 
Extremists 


in a traditional Messing ceremony before praying at the Western Wafl in Jerusalem. 



in PLO in Error 


By David Hoffman . 

Washington Post Service 

ISRAELI-OCCUPIED GAZA 
STRIP — Israeli officials acknowl- 
edged Tuesday that six armed ac- 
tivists in the Fatah wing of the 
Palestine Liberation Organization 
who were gunned down by an un- 
dercover unit Monday night were 
not fugitives, did not shoot at the 
Israeli soldiers, and were apparent- 
ly killed in error. 

Witnesses said a Palestinian who 
survived the first volley was later 
shot in the head and killed by the 
Israeli soldiers. 

Riots Dared across the West 
Bank and Gaza Strip. A youth, 16, 
from the Burey refugee camp here, 
was killed by army gunfire during 
violent demonstrations, and 40 
were reported wounded. Mean- 
while, an Israeli, 70, was critically 
wounded at a construction site near 
Tel Aviv by two Palestinians from 
Gaza wielding axes, the police said. 

Talks between Israel and the Pal- 
estinians on setting up a security 
force in Hebron went ahead late 
Tuesday at an undisclosed location 
in Cairo, but the PLO chairman, 
Yasser Arafat, charged that Israel 
had assassinated Fatah activists. 
“The crime is deliberate, the timing 
is deliberate and the aim is to sabo- 


tage the peace process," Mr. Arafat 
said in Tunis. 

Palestinians said the six who 
were killed were part of a security 
apparatus that El Fatah had been 
setting up in Gaza in anticipation 
of Israeli withdrawal The security 
apparatus had responsibility for 
controlling younger activists who 
make rap the armed gangs known as 
Fatah Hawks. 

Israeli officials apologized for 
the killings and expressed regret 
Foreign Minister Shimon Peres 
said the deaths wot “very regretta- 
ble?’ and “it wasn’t done intention- 
ally.’’ An army spokesman said the 
shootings were a “mistake” be- 
cause the Palestinians were not tar- 
gets. “It’s no! something we wanted 
to happen,” the spokesman said. 

The Israeli undercover unit 
“stumbled” upon Fatah activists in 
the Jab&tya refugee camp, and did 
not know they were affiliated with 
El Fatah ana the PLO, army offi- 
cials said. After seeing that the Pal- 
estinians were armea and wearing 
fatigues, the undercover unit ap- 
proached the Palestinians and 
opened fire, the army said. 

Separately, Palestinian witnesses 
told the Israeli human rights group 
Btsdem that the nnderoover unit 


shot the Palestinians in the head at 
dose range after they had been 
killed. Palestinians also said one of 
the Fatah activists who was wound- 
ed in the first round of fire was 
killed at dose range by an Israeli. 

“If this had happened at midday, 
they would still be afive,” a senior 
Israeli official said. M A bunch of 
soldiers who were chasing whoever, 
such as Hamas, and they bumped 
into these Palestinians in fatignes, 
armed, waving their weapons. So 
they shot them. Then they find out 
they are the wrong people — they 
are Fatah. Blame it cm a loaded 
situation, many people are roaming 
free with weapons. It was a kind of 
a screw up." 


The episode underscored how Is- 
raeli forces continue to launch mifi- 
taiy operations against Palestin- 
ians in the occupied territories, 
even as Israel is preparing to with- 
draw from parts of the Gaza Strip 
and Jericho. Last week, Israeli sol- 
diers bombarded an apartment 
house in Hebron, killing three Ha- 
mas activists in a two-day siege. 

After the Isradi-Palestmian ac- 
cord in September, there was an 
informal cease-fire declared be- 
tween El Fatah and the Israeli 
troops. Bol the cease-fire crum- 
bled, and Israeli troops shot and 
killed a number of El Fatah activ- 
ists, while others returned to taking 
up arms against Israeli targets. 


ANKARA — Prime Minister 
Tamu CHler on Tuesday urged 
rightist parties to unite after Islam- 
ic fun dame ntalists declared victory 
in Istanbul and Ankara and made 
striking gams in local elections 
across the country. 

“Tbe people have given the mes- 
sage that the right must unite;” she 
told legislators of Iter center-right 
True Path Parly, which narrowly 
led the center-right Mother- 
. Party for second place. 

The victories by the fundamen- 
talist Welfare Party in 22 mayoral 
races in Sunday’s local elections 
undermin ed the nationwide sup- 
port for True Path in other races. 

Nationwide, Welfare doubled its 
vote to 18 percent compared with 
the previous local vote five years 
ago. 

Mrs. Ciller, whose party led local 
races across the nation with 22 per- 
cent, said it was time to umte cen- 
ter-right parties. , 

“This is the message the doctor- 
ate gave us and they showed under 
which party they want this merger 
to happen,” she told True Path Par- 
ty deputies. 

With 84 percent of the vote 
counted, the main opposition 
Motherland Party had 21 percent 

The Social Democrat Populist 
Party, the junior coalition partner,’ 
had 13 percent. The far-right Na- ■ 
tionalist Action Party had 8 per- 
cent and the rest of the vote was 
divided among eight other parties. 

In final -results. Welfare Party 
members won 22 mayoral races; 
Motherland won 11; and the Social 
Democrats, True Path and Nation- 
alist Action, seven each. 

(Reuters, AP) 


Balladur Seeks Pay-Plan Alternative 

As Student Strikers Tie Up Traffic 

parts f API Students blocked highways is Paris and the provinces 

Tuesday while the government worked to fed an alteroatwe to a decree 
redocmg the minimum wage for many young people that set off nation- 

"mSSacr Edouarf Mtodur, his nrfibaity wtea be 
suspended the law after vowing to stick with it, ca aceled a television 
appearance Tuesday night marking his first ' 

Student leaders continued 'to plan to a danomwtioo Thursday m 
Paris to pressure the rightist government to fully withdraw the lawjjvfach 
cuts twtS rm wages for many youths. A teachers muon announced 

pI Hundreds Students blocked the entrance to Paris from the main 
northern highway during Tuesday’s rush hour, causing a nugor raffle 
j am Earlier, they occupied a suburban tram station, prevratmg trams 
from reaching the platforms and forcing passengers to get off m the 
middle of the tracks. 

S h anghai Dissidents Urge Democracy 

BEUING (AP) — In a new sign of resurgent political activism, 
Shanghai dissidents said Tuesday they had sent the government an qpm 
lSterdrajanding democratic change. The move is significant because it 
indicates that a recent round of pohee harassment and detentions has not 
dampened the dissidents’ enthusiasm or halted thor activity. 

Tne letter seat Friday to the standing committee of the national 
legislature protests the recent large-scale police detentions Also sent was 
a 1 9-paint political statement demanding the enactment erf laws ensuring 
freedom of the press and of political activity. . . 

It also demands the right to form independent labor urnras, the end of 
Communis t Party control over the police and nriKtaiy, and tiie removal of 
political cri m es from the legal code, two signatories, Bao Ge ana Yang 
Zhou, said in telephone interviews. 

Sinn Fein Leader Calls for New Talks 

LONDON (AFP) — Geny Adams, the leader of Sinn Fern, the 
political wing of the Irish Republican Army, said he did not know in 
pihi apc c about mortar attacks by the IRA on London's Heath row axipont. 

In an in terview Tuesday in Today newspaper, Mr. Adams appealed to 
the British government to “can the bluff of the IRA" by bolding talks to 
clarify a jami declaration for peace in Northern Ireland. Fouowing the 
first Heathrow mortar attack. Mr. Adams dedinod to condemn it and 
said that more “spectaculars" would take place. They did, although none 
of the mortars exploded. , . 

But he told Today; “I had wanted to argue that this was a challenge, 
that the conflict had not been resolved and that we must resolve it Yes, I 
used the unfortunate term, ’spectacular.* I didn't know about the a ttack s. ® 
Sinn Fein does not go to the IRA for permission, and certainly the IRA 
doesn't come to me.” 

Toll Heavy in Mozambique Storm 

MAPUTO, Mozambique (AP) — More than 1 million people were 
homeless Tuesday after a cyclone and heavy rains struck northern 
Mozambique. 

Carlos Cardoza, a journalist, said the toD stood at 24 dead and more 
than 200 injured, but authorities feared the figure would rise as reports 
rany » in from remote towns and villages. Government and United 
Nations rescue teams were supplying tents, food, medicine and drinking 
water to areas in Nampula province. 

The brunt of the cyclone hit Nacala, an Indian Ocean port about 2,000 
kilometers (1,200 miles) north of Maputo, on Thursday night, sin king 
three boots. The storm then moved inland, destroying hundreds of 
thatched roofed homes. The cydone was followed by heavy rains. 

Museveni Backers Lead in Uganda 

KAMPALA (Reuters) — Supporters of President Yoweri Museveni 
secured an early strong showing an Tuesday in Uganda’s first real 
experiment with democracy, officials said. 

With more than 20 percent of ballots counted firom Monday’s vote for 
a new assembly, government minis ters had good backing and Mr. 
Museveni's supporters fared particularly well in the sooth and southwest 

Mr. Museveni did not run for any of the 214 seats in the new 
constituent assembly, and campaig ning an the basis of political parties 
was barred, but the polls pitted fas s u p portas against critics demanding a 
faster transition to a multiparty system. 

Ransom Is Discussed for ’Scream’ 

OSLO (Reuters) — A group of Norwegian investors is discussing! 
paying a ransom for one of the worid’s most famous paintings, “The ! 
Scream,’' a spokeswoman for Culture Minister Aase Kievdand said 
Tuesday. 

The Norwegian daily Dagbladel said an anonymous group had been 
negotiating with representatives of tbe purported thieves over a 5-nriflion 
crown (about $685,000) ransom for the 1893 Norwegian work. It was 
stolen from an Oslo gallery Feb. 11 

“The Scream,” painted by Edvard Munch, shows a waif-like figure 
wide-mouthed is tenor beneath a blood-red sky. 

13 Die in Kashmir Munitions Blast 

SRINAGAR, India (AF) — An explosion at an army munitions depot 
killed at least 13 soldiers Tuesday and wounded 7, starting a huge me. " 
Rescue teams were continuing to search for victims. The Defense Minis- 
try ruled out sabotage as the cause of the explosion. 

The depot stored explosives and arms seized from Muslim separatists - 
whose separatist movement in Kashmir turned violent four years ago. ■ 
More than 8,500 people have been killed since then. 


SEX: Decades Later, Masters & Johnson Are Stitt at It 


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GoBthraed bom Page t 
with long, tapered fingers. Mrs. 

Johnson leaned back, a little impe- 
riously. Years ago, even Woody Al- 
len made jokes about them. This is 
because, let's face it, tbe idea of 
these two cerebral people zealously 
studying sex in a lab is funny. 

But why? 

“I think the reason people are selfesteem.’’ 
uncomfortable with sex, Dr. Mas- 
ters said, “is that we still know so 
little about it.” 

“Some people still believe that 
sex is dirty, even after matrimony," 
said Mrs. Johnson. “Sometimes it 
feels like nothing has changed. In 
spite of the incredible availability 
erf sex-related material —in enter- 
tainment, in education, 
we’re back where we started. 


□ed about tbeir own ii 

“Perceived or real,” added 
Johnson. 

“Right," said Dr. Kolodny, “and 
these are people who create sexual 
problems for themselves inadver- 
tently, by worry, by self-fulfiUing 
prophecies that start out as simply 
poor sexual confidence or poor 


it’s 


It sounds so complicated 
amazing anybody does it 
“Shows you,” Mrs. Johnson said, 
“how strong the reproductive im- 
pulse is." 

The book covers all kinds of new 
fronts — AIDS, infertility, teenage 
sex, plus endless problem-solving 
I fed like — “skills that people can try on 
rted.” their own,” Dr. Kolodny said. It 


Dr. Kolodny provided another answers questions you might have 
iL “Why is sex embarrass- — like why sexual desire for some- 
iug? Think of aD the people in our body you have seen naked a million 


society with serious 
problems. Tbe women with 
problems who are constant 
diets. Men who are worried about 
tire size of their penis or their bald 
heads or whatever. Anybody war- 


times can fade — backed by the 
most amazing clinical research. 
One chapter deals with sexual ap- 
petites, and why some people seem 
to want more sex than others. 

Dr. Kolodny tried to answer the 


eternal question; Why do people 
have affairs? 

“Men usually have affairs to find 
sexual variety and excitement,” he 
said, “whfle women are more apt to 
have affairs looking tor emotional 
returns.” 

They used such words as “accou- 
trements” and “gestalt” They 
talked about “meaningful dia- 
logue" and doing “cross-cultural 
work.” 

And what if you’re married and 
just don't want to have sex any- 
more? 

“If people have no interest in 
sex, is it possible to have a heal thy, 
happy, contented marriage?” Dr. 
Kolodny asked. “Sure! Why should 
any experts be the arbiters? That’s 
like telling someone they can’t be a 
vegetarian.” 

“Let’s just hope," said Mr. John- 
son, “that these people not interest- 
ed in sex are married to each oth- 
er." 

“If- they’re not," said Dr. Ko- 
lodny, “they're going to come see 
us.” 


TRAVEL UPDATE 
Lodi Ness Tourist Sub Is Launched 

DRUMNADROCH3T, Scotland (AFP) — Tbe Lodi Ness Monster 
Center launched a submarine Tuesday for tourists who want to explore 
Scotland’s most famous body of water. 

For £68 ($100) each, five tourists and a pilot can descend 230 meters 
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monster-watchers will not be too cramped in the white Canadian-made ' 
craft About the size <rf a small bus, it measures more than 10 meters and 
weighs 24 tons. 

OtympK Airways has begtm flying to Stockholm five times a week from ^5]f 
Athens and Salonika, with a stop in Copenhagen, a service t hat is to latf ’ > 
until Oct, 29. (AP)% 

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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 


Page 3 ^ 


i I'Vi'A^ 

, ^,,h I- Lauc^ 

* • W * ' . 


■JL 


Women Democrats 
Rush to the Defense 
Of HiUnry Clinton 




Oi. tiu 8L iLi. 




I W 


X-b?r. Is 






Newsweek Admits to ^Misunderstanding’ 


By Gwen Ifill 

,Vw rerit Times Service 


bvpo^^toSfwhiil h ^ 01 Dc ® ocraiic w °“«. tied 
defend Hfllarv Rnrfhl™ /2P urace * ^ a campaign to 

anadsS S fron > 

an^theSvStfL^ jJ“*5L^ VB “Pressed frustration 
out ritmWv ™ ^ Mrs. Clinton's choice not to speak 
SlmSKrV® h 09,11 Walk have been meeting fora 

colder unSf inSl0n 10 p *° l wa y® 10 str * e bade at what they 
Press cowage and partisan assault 
hawb^iSi .pong Democrats around the country, they 
hjratwen distnbuting lapel stickers that read, “Don't pfllo^y 

neJ^n^er ^foH 1 ^ ^ *? ian 10 be ^ D ^*“5 ,eners k> 

Mft£55£ *' u “ '“‘“ 1 r - ^ 

As its first step into the arena of national opinion, the 
B ttF “ 9 u gbt a full-page advertisement in the Tuesday issue 
Sr™ *!?* Tunes **“ 1 Clinton to Eleanor 

ttoosevelt and disputes several accusations central to die 
mquiry. pie advertisement was paid for with 
5 jU,uuu in donations from individuals around the country. 

ril TJ* ***?? ° f a “ ltt>n *“» been coordinated by Lynn 

HJ?? ™. Ann F. Lewis, two consultants in Washington 
with Jong ties to the Democratic Party. 

The group has grown to include supporters like Susan 
Tnomas«, a New York lawyer; Joanne Woodward, the 
actress; Letty Cottm Pogrebin, the writer; and a few men, 
mclodmg Tony Randall, the actor, and Michael D. Barnes 
and Tony Coeiho, both former members of Congress. 

Specifically not included on the list are current gWioj 
officials and members of the Clinton administration. 

Organizers concede that there have been "after hours” 
conversations about the matter with White House 
“Running a full-page ad is not exactly a secret strategy,” Ms! 
Lewis said. 

But Ms. Lewis, Ms. Cutler and advisers who said they 
knew nothing of the campaign played down such influence, 
saying their participation would only tain t an otherwise 
spontaneous effort 




wmm*. 


=&■ ' 



By Howard Kurtz 

Washington Post Soviet 

WASHINGTON — Newsweek 
m a g a z ine has acknowledged that 
an article accusing Hillary Rodham 
Clinton of profiting from a “sweet- 
heart deal" was based cm a “misun- 
derstanding” with the source, who 
has denounced the report as “false 
and irresponsible.” 

“If we need to make an apology 
to the White House at the end of all 
this, we will,” said Evan Thomas, 
the magazine’s Washington bureau 
chid. But, he said, " We’re not go- 
ing to apologize until we see that 
the basis for the story was actually 
wrong.” 

Newsweek failed to call the 
White House for comment before 
announcing its “exclusive” in a 
press release Saturday. 

The article, appearing in the is- 
sue that went on sale Monday, 
charged that Mrs. Clinton "never 
pul up any money of her own” for 
an investment in catde futures that 
netted her a $99,000 profit in 1978 


and 1979. The in vestment, previ- 
ously disclosed by The New York 
Tunes, was ananged by a friend 
who was an attorney for Tyson 
Foods, a major Arkansas company. 

The White House has refused 
repeated requests from news orga- 
nizations to say how much money 
Mrs. Clinton put up or to release 
records of the investment But lisa 
Caputo, the first lady’s press secre- 
tary, said her office planned to re- 
lease information soon. 

“We’ve had a number of inqui- 
ries now, so we just decided to go 
ahead and present all the facts.” 
Ms. Caputo said. 

A Newsweek reporter. Rich 
Thomas, attributed the finding that 
Mrs. Clinton put up no personal 
funds to Marvin A. Chirdstean, a 
Columbia University law profes- 
sor. Mr. Chirelstem was one of four 
tax experts asked by the White 
House to review the Clintons' 
1977-79 tax returns and supporting 
documents and respond to media 
inquiries when the returns were 
mule public Friday. 


Mr. Chirdstein said Monday he 
was “simply outraged and humili- 
ated" by the “biased" article and 
the conclusions attributed to him. 

"I never said anything like that.” 
Mr. Chirelslein said. “1 never said 
it was a sweetheart deaL 1 never 
said it was a gift. My role was to be 
supportive of the White House.” 

In a statement, Ms. Caputo and 
a White House staff secretary. John 
Podcsta, accused Newsweek of 
"careless journalism.” They said 
Mrs. Clinton risked her own money 
and that "these repeated false 
statements” could have been avoid- 
ed “had Newsweek demonstrated 
either the courtesy or professional- 
ism of checking them with the 
White House.” 

Mr. Chirdstdn said the reporter 
asked him whether he had seen any 
documents showing that Mrs. Clin- 
ton risked her own money in the 
commodities market. "When 1 said 
no, I merely meant that was evi- 
dence I had no responsibility for 
gathering.” said Mr. Qrirdstrin. 


The professor, who is an ac- 
quaintance of the Clin ions’ lawyer, 
David Kendall, said the White 
House asked him to examine re- 
cords on the Whitewater land deal 
but not on the commodities invest- 
ment. He also disputed other con- 
clusions attributed to him by 
Newsweek. 

Mr. Thomas, the bureau chief, 
said: “There’s just a basic disagree- 
ment over what was said in this 
conversation. Rich’s notes support 
his version." But to clarify the 
"misunderstanding,” he said, 
Newsweek will publish on editor's 
note saying it now accepts Mr. 
Chirelstein’s contention that he 
never examined the commodities 
trading and does not believe it was 
a sweetheart deaL 

Newsweek did not check with 
the White House, Mr. Thomas said, 
because “we were talking to the 
While House's fferig naift-t expert” 

“In retrospect” he said, “I wish 
we had made the second phone call 
as well." 


TV Appearance Aided Clinton in Poll 


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HUaiy Rodham Qmtoo taking a morning bike ride in Coronado, 
California, on the first day of the Cfinton family’s vacation there. 


Washington Pass Service 

WASHINGTON — Public support for Pres- 
ident Bill Clinton surged following his prime- 
time news conference last week on the 
Whitewater affair, according to a Washington 
Post-ABC News PoU 

The televised news conference appeared to 
restore Mr. Clinton's standing- after signs that 
Whitewater had begun to erode his popularity, 
and most respondents said they believed 
Whitewater had diverted the government from 
more important national concerns. 

The survey, conducted over the weekend, 
found that more than half of those interviewed 
approved of the way Mr. Clinton was handling 
the Whitewater matter. Three weeks ago only 
one-third expressed a similar view. 

More than half — SS percent — say they do 
not think Mr. Clinton did anything illegal, up 


from 44 percent earlier in the month. And a 
larger majority said the president was "mostly 
telling the truth” about nis involvement in the 
failed Arkansas land development company. 

But the new survey found that two out of 
three Americans acknowledged they under- 
stand little or nothing about the Whitewater 
affair, suggesting that attitudes on Whitewater 
could change again 

Mr. Clinton's ratings began to skid after 10 
White House and Treasury Department offi- 
cials were subpoenaed by the special counsel, 
Robert B. Fiske Jr., to appear before a federal 
grand jury to explain what happened at three 
meetings where the Whitewater matter was dis- 
cussed. 

With Congress voting to hold public hearin g s 
at an unspecified rime and with Mr. Clinton 
and Hillary Rodham Clinton under pressure to 


disclose more details about their involvement in 
the matter, the White House derision to sched- 
ule last Thursday’s press conference appears to 
have paid the dividends Mr. Clinton’s advisers 
had hoped for. 

A week ago, a Post-ABC poll registered a 
sharp decline in Mr. Clinton’s approval rating, 
to 47 percent. But after the press conference, his 
approval rating jumped to 57 percent, about 
where it was before the Whitewater issue began 
to heat up. 

The findings suggest that Mr. Clinton's an- 
swers on Thursday night, along with his deri- 
sion to release his lax returns from 1977 to 
1979, helped reassure many Americans that he 
was dealing forthrightly with the issue. 

The survey questioned of 1,029 randomly 
selected adult Americans. The margin of error 
is phis or minus three percentage prints. 


POLITICAL NOTES 


Incumbents Running Scared 

WASHINGTON — ZeU Miller has been a fix- 
ture in Georgia Democratic politics for two de- 
cades. as governor for the last four years and as 
lieutenant governor for 16 years before that This 
year he’s running scared. 

"Am I aware Fve got a beckuva race coming 
up?” be said. "Sure. It's just out there and yon try 
to deal with iL” 

Senator Frank R. Lantenbag, Democrat of 
New Jersey, has a simil ar battle ahead. Running 
for his third term, Mr. Lau ten berg has poll num- 
bers that would make any politician blanch. A 
recent poll found that only 28 percent of the people 
in his state said he deserved to be re-elected. 

New York’s governor, Mario M. Cuomo, a 
Democrat, wants a fourth term and may weD get it. 
But a recent poQ showed that just 36 percent of the 
voters give him high marks. 

Mr. Cuomo, Mr. Lautenberg and Mr. Miller 
have plenty of company. Incumbents at all levels 
and m all regions are faring a bleak political 
landscape as they begin their campaigns. 

‘There's no question there's a cynicism cm there 
that’s been budding for years, ana it's probably at 
its high point,” said Don Swatzer. political direc- 
tor at the Democratic National Committee. "To 
the extent that a lot of our incumbents haven’t had 
to work very hard to get elected, they’re going to 
have to this year. They’re going to have to make the 
case for themselves.” 

Because Democrats have more incumbents at 
every level — House, Senate and in the governor- 
ships — they have more to fear this year than 
Republicans do. But incumbents from both parties 
are finding they must adapt to this new environ- 
ment if they hope to survive. 

Incumbency once meant respect and likely re- 
election, and it still carries enormous advantages. 
Incumbents typically can outraise and outspend 
their challengers by considerable margins. 

But the mood of voter anger that surfaced in 
1990 has hardened over the last four years, and 
once-comf enable incumbents find voters are less 
willing than ever to give them a break. 

“The equation that you keep someone in office 
unless there’s a reason to change clearly has been 
discredited in the voters’ minds," said Geoff 


Garin, a Democratic pofl-taker. “Voters come to 
this process with a view that they at least ought to 
be opei to the prospect of change.” (WP) 

Harkln Campaign Must Pay Up 

WASHINGTON — The Federal Election Com- 
mission says the 1992 presidential cam p ai g n of 
Iowa's Democratic senator, Tom Harltin, owes the 
government 559,91 1 because it received apparently 
prohibited contributions and excessive federal 
matching funds. The largest amount owed was 
nearly 525,000 to refund excess federal matching 
fund payments. 

The election commission audits all presidential 
campaigns, and over the years has required repay- 
ments of as much as several hundred thousand 
doflarrfm a variety of reasons. 

In the heat of a campaign, treasurers can fail to 
notice contributions that later turn out to be ille- 
gal, and when this is found the money is required 
to be paid to the U.S. Treasury. The report said 
Senator Harlan's committee was formed June 3, 
1991, to promote the presidential campaign of the 
senator. As of the end of last year the committee 
had cash on hand totaling more than S2DQfl00, the 
audit found. (AP) 

Hew Signature* on Currency 

WASHINGTON — More than a year ago, 
Lloyd Bentsen replaced Nicholas F. Brady at the 
US. Treasury Department Now, Mr. Bemsen’s 
signature is about to replace the former treasury 
secretary’s on U.S. currency. 

The Treasury said Monday that Mr. Bentsen 
and Treasurer Mary Ellen Withrow will unvefl a 
new currency series bearing their signatures at an 
April 7 ceremony at the US. Bureau of Engraving 
and Printing plant in Fort Worth, Texas. 

Most currency in circulation now bears the 
names of Mr. Brady and the former treasurer, 
Catalina VjUalpando. who held office during the 
Bush adminis tration. (AP) 

Quote / Unquote 

HflLary Rodham Clinton, asked bow it felt to be 
out of Washington and on vacation in California; 
“It’s great to be Wiring.” 




Away 

From Politics 

• A fuMrfim tourist charged 

in the fatal stabbing of a candy 

\[ store owner in Pompano 
Beach, Florida, was refused 
. ' bond. Jean-Fran^ois Chali- 
foux, 27, of Quebec, was or- 
■ dered held at the Broward 
County jaiL He was ch arged 
- with first-degree murder, ac- 

’ cused of stabbing Manlu 
. Cogswell .10 to 12 tunes after 
be tried to rob her store. 

• A former GE executive 
pleaded not euDty to federal 

’ charges that ne was involved 
in an scheme to siphon $1 1 
mini on in U.S. mfliuny aid to 
IsraeL Herbert B. Steadier, 
" 55, of Melbourne Beach Flor- 

ida, was indicted March 17. 

• Two U.SL sohfieis pleaded 
gnO ty to giving sensitive nnh- 
taiy information to Hungary 
winie stationed in Germany in 
1 985, a federal prosecutor said 
in Tampa, Florida. Stan Ser - 
geantsJeffrey Eugeo® Greg- 
ory, 32, and Jeffrey Stephen 
Rondeau, 3a both pleaded 
guilty to espionage. 

• A teenager bi Newark, New 
Jersey, who was seriously 

, wounded two years ago. oslen- 
■ sibly by police, as he emerged 
from a stolen car, was ar- 
raigned in connection with a 
caijacking, two shootings, 
multiple robberies and the 
r amming of a police cnnseLah 
in the course of two hours. The 
teenager, Howard Caesar, and 
four others were charged. 

Af, Reuters 


U.S. Rules Out Linking 
Caucasus Death to Ames 


The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON — The State 
Department has reaffirmed that a 
U.S. official killed last year in the 
republic of Georgia died in “a ran- 
dom act of violence.” 

The statement came in response 
to questions about whether the 
of the official, Fred Wood- 
ruff, 45, was linked to an accused 
CIA spy, Aldrich Hazen Ames. 

A U.S. law enforcement investi- 
gation concluded that Mr. Wood- 
ruffs shooting death last year in 
the former Soviet republic “was not 
politically motivated," said the 
State Department spokesman, 
MfteMcamy. 

Although the administration has 
not officially confirmed it, Mr. 
Woodruff is believed to have been 
a QA officer. The director of cen- 
tral intelligence, R. James Woolsey 
Jr , flew to Tbilisi from Moscow to 
bring home Mr. Woodruff’s body. 

Mr. Ames, accused with his wife, 
Rosario, of conspiracy to commit 
espionage, has been reported by 
several news organizations to have 
visited Georgia m July, the month 
before Mr. Woodruff was killed. 

Mr. Woodruff was shot in the 
head while traveling with three 


Georgian acquaintances. Accord- 
ing to Mr. McCurry, investigators 
found that the four were driving 
about 40 Jriknneters (25 miles) out- 
side Tbilisi on Aug. 8 when they 
came upon a stranded car. 

A man from the stalled car, An- 
zor Sharmaidze, tried to flag down 
the Woodruff vehicle and shot at h 
when the car did not stop. 

He hit Mr. Woodruff, and later 
confessed to firing the tingle shot, 
said Mr. McCurry. He was arrested 
and convicted in the shooting, and 
sentenced last month to 15 years cf 
hard labor. 

"The results of this investigation 
indicate that this attack was a ran- 
dom act of violence and was not 
politically motivated,” Mr. 
McCurry said. 

The CIA inspector-general is 
conducting his own investigation of 
the Woodruff case as part of his 
overall review of the Ames matter, 
a CIA spokesman said- 


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Page 4 


WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 

OPINION 


a 

§; 


Herald 


INTERNATIONAL 



Sribunc. 


PUBLISHED WITH THE NEW YORK TIMES AND T1IE WASHINGTON POST 


Perhaps a Start in Italy 


Hie rebuilding of Italy was bound to take 
more than one election. After the explosion of 
scandal that destroyed the old order, the ma- 
terial for a new order consisted of the frag- 
ments of the discredited old parties, some 
more or less scandal-free politicians who had 
nevertheless been isolated on the margin of 
politics for other reasons, and ambitions new 
men out to climb to the top of the rabble. 
These were not the makings of a smoothly 
running politics. So it has proved. The voting 
on Sunday and Monday ended the old Italy. It 
has not yet created the new one. 

The victorious SOvio Berlusconi, new man 
on top of the pile, faces two difficulties in 
budding a government that win last. One is his 
economic imprecision. His tax proposals, al- 
though they helped him win the election, do not 
seem property worked out If be applies them, 
the result could be another imishroomiqg of 
Italy’s huge public debt, and the disintegration 
of the government responsible for h. 

The other difficulty is that the coalition Mr. 
Berlusconi leads into power seems all too 
liable to disintegrate. The Northern League, 
already angry with Mr. Berlusconi about the 
allocation of seats, wants to protect Italy’s 
efficient north against its tumultuous south. 
The ex-neofascisi National Alliance is a loud 
voice of the noisy south, and may be acquiring 
an anti-NATO bails as well Forza Italia is 
Mr. Berlusconi’s handmade instrument, as 
unpredictable as be hims elf is. He is a man of 
imagin ation, energy and wQL Can he turn an 
unwieldy trio into a purposeful government? 

The losers are Side mare coherent Theance- 
Communist Democratic Left made most eco- 
nomic sense during the campaign. lihas proba- 
bly established itself as the axe of a new 
center-left, an intelligent leader of the opposi- 


tion to Mr. Berlusconi and a replacement for 
him if be fails. But its own election alliance was 
full of cracks, and would have had trouble 
holding together if it had won. Neither sde of 
Italy’s politics yet looks solid. 

For a solid Italy, more change is needed. 
The Northern League, for a start, has to make 
up its mind whether it wants to he a shaper of 
a single, modem new Italy or merely the 
naggjng voice of the rich and disgruntled 
north. But the problem goes deeper than that 
Italy requires a simpler pattern of politics. It 
does not need the dozen or more parties that 
still entangle its parliament It needs three or 
four, each with its distinctive body of ideas. 
That win at last give Italian voters a dear 
choice, a moresetf-disdpKned parliament and 
a government that will answer their wishes. 

To some extent this may happen naturally, 
as smaller groups get absorbed by bigger ones. 
But it may also all for a further change in 
Italy’s election system. Although three-quar- 
ters of the seats in tins election were fought on 
the first-past-the-post system, this did not 
produce the necessary amplification. Hu 
quarter still chosen by proportional represen- 
tation tempted too many parties to keep on 
going it alone. The sorting out of Italy re- 
quires a plainer election system, more like 
Britain's or France's. 

In the end. though, the chances of a new 
order depend above ail on Mr. Berlusconi 
himself. He has to haul his unruly troika onto 
a responsible economic course. He has to 
convert hims elf from a political fireworks dis- 
play into a serious national leader. He is a 
remarkable man — the election proved that. If 
he confounds the skeptics, the true building of 
Italy’s Second Republic will have begun. 

INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE 


Disarming in South Asia 


U.S. intelligence predicts that if a nuclear 
war is going to happen, it will be between 
India and Pakistan. Both have all the nuclear 
material and parts they need to assemble a 
considerable stock of warheads, and each is 
developing missil es capable of striking the 
other’s cities. Washington wants them to stop 
their arms race — and then reverse iL 
But how? The Clinton administration ar- 
gues that the United States should resume aid 
to Pakistan and deliver the F-16 fighters that 
it paid for but never received, if it first agrees 
to a verifiable ban on the production of nucle- 
ar material and halts its missile programs. 
Opponents in Congress say that such induce- 
ments have not worked. The a dminis tration is 
right to try a g ain , but it needs to persuade 
India to go along. India insists that it will not 
accept any deal that does not impose re- 
straints on filing as weQ as Pakistan 
U.S. aid has long been advertised as the most 
effective way to dissuade Pakistan from budd- 
ing the Bomb, despite mounting evidence that 
it was doing just that America sold it F-16s 
thgf could be reconfigured to deliver nuclear 
bombs. It even sold some technology that con- 
tributed directly to Pakistan’s nuclear effort. 
Then, two years ago, aid was finally Suspended- 
Officials who favor resumption argue that 
India, which gets no U.S. aid or arms, is under 
no comparable restraint. Pakistan is the weaker 
of the two, they say, and denying it F-16s 
makes it more dependent on nuclear arms. 


Opponents in Congress counter that relaxing 
restrictions would reward disregard of UJS. 
nonproliferation policies, appear to legitimize 
Pakistani bomb-making, and send the wrong 
message to other would-be prohferators. 

But something must be done to tty to stop 
the subcontinent's aims race. The United 
States sboald resume aid and aims sales — but 
only if Pakistan agrees to two steps. It must 
accept international safeguards over all nuclear 
facilities and account for the nuclear material ft 
has already produced — in effect, 
further production. Second, it must halt 
missile tests and deployments. 

F-16 deliveries to Pakistan might be de- 
layed a while longer to give India a chance to 
follow suit. India’s initial opposition to a deal 
is possibly a tactical ploy; it may yet be 
induced to go along because it needs high-tech 
trade with the United Slates as well as nuclear 
fuel and technical assistance for its power 
plants. The prospects fin a deal would surety 
be improved, however, if China could be per- 
suaded to stop selling missile components to 
Pakistan and relocate the missiles it has de- 
ployed near India’s border. 

Rolling back the nuclear aims race will re- 
quire India and Pakistan to address their inse- 
curity by building mutual confidence and re- 
ducing the ride of war. But that effort cannot 
begin until both sides recog ni ze that bomb- 
building only leaves them less secure. 

— THE NEW YORK TIMES. 


Wage Puzzle in France 


Confronted with a wave of violent protests 
over wages, France's prime minister, Edouard 
Bahadur, has retreated. With that, he has 
involuntarily illustrated once again a central 
dilemma of social policy with which all of the 
wealthy Western democracies are struggling. 

Throughout Western Europe and North 
America, good jobs for unskilled labor are 
rapidly vanishing. One cause is technology 
that pushes up productivity. Another is trade 
.and competition with low-wage countries to 
the south. The United States is allowing wages 
for unskilled and semi-skilled weak to decline 
with the market. That keeps employment rela- 
tively high, but at the cost of sinking incomes 
at the low end of the scale and a widening gap 
between rich and poor. In contrast, most of 
the European countries are hying to maintain 
security and incomes. Thai leads to much 
higher unemployment there among people 
who have no highly developed skiffs. 

In France, among people under 25, one out 
of four has no job. To reduce this huge popula- 
tion of unemployed and unemployable young 
people, the government came up with an alto- 
gether sensible idea. It would permit employers 
to pay these young people a little less than the 
minimum wage — which is higher in France 
than in America — for Hunted periods if the 
employers in return provided training. 

In response, young people poured oat into 
the streets of cities and towns all over France 
for the most vehement demonstrations in 
years. They clearly believed that the govern- 
ment was violating a promise to thorn of a 
certain wage, and they rejected the possibility 
of a trade-off of wages for job training. 

Mr. Baffadur’s center-right government — - 
after waiting for the completion last weekend 
of a round of local elections in which it did 
veiy nicety — backed down and announced on 


Monday that it was suspending foe whole plan. 
, France represents the extreme case <rf the 
rich countries’ wage quandary. Its political 
traditions, both left and right, have never 
really acknowledged the concept of a market 
in labor. This incident is the third in six 
months in which Mr. Baffadur has caved in 
to public protests against threats to accus- 
tomed incomes. Last fall he abandoned cost 
reductions at Air France in the face of a 
strike, and last month he promised more 
subsidies to fishermen who were rioting over 
faffing prices. Further experiments with mar- 
ket economics are unlikely before next year’s 
presidential election, in which Mr. Ballad or 
may be a candidate. But at the same tune, 
voters also want to see those painful unem- 
ployment rales come down. 

— THE WASHINGTON POST. 

Other Comment 

An Invitation to BaSadar 

[Sunday’s] second-round cantonal elections 
came one year after the collapse of the left and 
the arrival in power <tf Edouard Baffadur. Hze 
majority can take satisfaction in the election 
results; the leftist opposition can feel even 
more satisfied to see in the second round a 
confirmation of its revival, albeit a fragile one, 
after last year’s electoral catastrophe. 

Hie confirmation of the majority’s legitima- 
cy and the rebirth of the left give Mr. Balladur 
an opportunity to take new initiatives, particu- 
larly regarding the youn& The French have not 
thrown themselves into his arms, but not have 
they rejected him. Perhaps we can read in the 
election results an invitation to be bold. 

— Jem cTOrmesson in Le Figaro (Paris). 



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Better Flawed Voting Than More Drift in South Africa 

rOHANNESBURG - The violence that Bw Jon Owelane a few daysb^ore JL' hSSvT thfdSS^ 1 ^^^: d 


J OHANNESBURG — The violence that 
caused scores of deaths in the Johannes- 
burg area on Monday, notably in fighting 
between Zulu protesters and security guards 
for the African National Congress, is a blood- 
stained reminder iiwi the birth of democracy 
in South Africa will not be easy. 

The opinion polls here all show that the 
ANC, led by Nelson Mandela, wQl handily 
win South Africa's first uonradal elections 
next month. Kit the elections will be marred 
by violence and possibly fraud, tainting the 
ANCs victory and hiding racial strife. 

The political fighting that spilled over into 
Johannesburg on Monday has long ravaged 
the nation's blade communities. Most white 
South Africans, unfortunately, choose to be- 
lieve the fallacy that it stems solely from 
e thnic animosity between Xhosa-speakmg 
and Zulu-speaking blades. 

Yes, some Zulus believe that it is their 
ethnic duty to destroy the Xhosa-led ANC, 
and vice versa. But more potent threats to 
democracy lie elsewhere. 

Consider the recent report by Judge Rich- 
ard Goldstone of the Supreme Court that high 
officials in the South African police are run- 
ning guns as part cf a tystematic plan to scuttle 

the constitutional process. This was hardly a 


By Jon Qwelane 

Foes of apartheid have repeatedly 

government that a highly organized 

-third force" is behind the violence between 
the ANC and its rival, the Inkatha Freedom 
Party of the Thfadrirf, Mangosuthn ButhdezL 
The disintegration of the racial homelands 
through revolt by dvQ servants suggests apart 
between the ANC and the government to dis- 
mantle apartheid's strongest remaining pillars. 
This has deepened the Zulus’ suspicions about 
the true intent behind the elections. 

Another danger to the elections is violence 
by ultracooservative Afrikaners. Marty reject 
the constitutional framework in favor of an 
independent homeland, and have sworn logo 
to war to win their separate state. 

A terrifying recent development, the influx 
of Ger man neo-Nazis bolstering the Afrika- 
ners, vrill fan the flames. In the past two 
weeks several Germans have been arrested in 
skirmishes with the police. 

One of them, Horst Klenz, is no stranger to 
racial troubles in southern Africa. The Nami- 
bian government says he led a group of Afri- 
kaners who blew up a United Nations office 
and killed a security guard and a policeman 


a few days before Namibia’s 1989 elections* 
Anolher worrisome sign was the call by the 
7 jt 1» Wng, Goodwill Zwdithim. for a separate 
Znhi state. Many Zulu tribesmen have been 
stirred by the king’s statement; they have 
prevented the ANC from holding election 
rallies in three cities this month. 

On March 13, ANC officials canceled a 
meeting between Mr. Mandela and the king 
in Ulundi because they feared Zulu viotence. 
Those fears proved founded. Hundreds of Zulu 
tribesmen descended on the town, .openly 
blandishing Kalashnikov automatic rul e s — 
the same type of weapon that Judge Gddstone 
accused police generals of dispenaug to Zvan& 
This month. President f.W. de Kteric 
made a last -ditch effort to save his campaign 
by offering Chief Bufoetezi a deal io get hnn 
to participate in the elections. Details of the 
plan were not disclosed, but highly placed 
government officials told me that it involved 
getting iniratha to enter the elec- 

tions under the banner of Mr. de Klerk’s 
National Party in hopes that their combined 
votes would keep the ANC and its Commu- 
nist alfas at bay. The chief rejected the offer. 
The two met on Sunday to discuss ways of 
avoiding violence.' but Monday’s events indi- 
cate that this had little effect 


A dangerous scenario is becoming ever 
more Kkdy as the elections approach; the 
ANC wins, but the international agencies 
monitoring the elections declare that the re- 
sults were tainted by polling irregularities. 

What would happen then? The answer is 
painful: we would have to make the bpt of a 
badsi (nation and proceed as though the elec- 
tions were untainted. A state of emergency 
would probably have to be declared to con- 
tain the <mo*mg widespread violence. (Of 
course, there win bean upsurge of killing after 
the voting no matter what happens.) 

Purists might argue that to honor an irregu- 
lar paff would be undemocratic and a subver- 
sion of what the elections aim to secure. They 
would be right. But any other option, such as 
scheduling fresh elections and leaving Mr. de 
Klerk's unpopular administration in ns care- 
taker position, would be the spark that ignites 
a greater powder keg. 

There comes a time in the history erf some 
nations when drastic measures are required to 
ensure their preservation. Sooth Africa is 
about to reach that paint. 

The writer is editor of Tribute, a South 
African newsmagazine. He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. 


Among Israelis and Palestinians, Coexistence Has to Be Mutual 


N azareth, Israel — An old 

Arab says that Jews celebrate 
their feasts around gardens, Christians 
msiri* kitchens and Muslims around 
graveyards. This year, at the end erf the 
Islamic holy month of Ramadan, die 
Arab residents of the West Bank town 
of Hebron had a tragic new reason to 
ken tins old tradition. 

The lifting of a round-the-clock 
curfew for a few hours on March 11 
was barely enough time for the Arab 
residents of Hebron to visit the new 
graves of beloved ones, victims of the 
massacre at the shrine of Abraham in 
Hebron on Feb. 25. Since that date, 
the land has been doaked with sor- 
row and shame. 

The sorrow of the bereaved fam- 
ilies is blended with the shame of all 
those who refused to anticipate the 
possibility of such a crime. 

Negotiators on all rides in the cur- 
rent peace talks have mainly been 
interested in whether the Palestin- 
ians can peacefully coexist with Is- 
rael. No one dared ask whether Isra- 
el was capable of peaceful coex- 
istence with the Palestinians. 

Yet there is no alternative but to 


By Emile Habibi 


believe that the peace process will 
overcome the Hebron orrieaL 
All but the most militant Palestin- 
ians recognize that reconciliation 
with Israel is the only salvation. Our 
determination to survive was born 
out of such ordeals. 

The 1 956 massacre by Israeli border 
police at Kfar Kasim, an Arab ' 
m Israel, which claimed 49 foes, • 
strengthened the attachment of Isra- 
el's Arabs to their homdand. 

As for our Israeli Jewish brothers 
and sisters, they have also shown that 
are here to stay. 

fit were not for this mutual recog- 
nition between Palestinians and Is- 
raelis — of the impossibility of forc- 
ing other people from their only 
homeland — this historic reconcilia- 
tion could not be achieved. 

Since the United Nations partition 
of 1947, most Palestinians have un- 
derstood that our national conflict 
with Israel could not be resolved 
through one nation annihilating the 
other, as in centuries past 
The fact is that my people, the 


uuw oil 


Palestinian people, were always the 
rates who were threatened with being 
f raced to leave. Thus Israel's recogni- 
tion of the Palestine Liberation Orga- 
nization. winch continues to fight lor 
Palestinian self-detenmnafion. is a 
great achievement, and it cannot be 
altered either by massacres or by ex- 
tremists on either ride. 

Yet one cannot go on pretending 
that nothing has changed after the 
Hebron massacre. This month Prime 
Minister Yhzhak Rabin said be did 
not dare even to imagine “what the 
reaction of the Jews would be if an 
Arab madman were to commit a mas- 
sacre against Jewish worshipers in the 
shrin e of Abraham." 

Sober-minded and responsible Is- 
raeli politicians cannot allow them- 
selves the foxnry of presuming that 
they wiD be able to keep every faction 
under control, even if they have the 
best and most sophisticated security. 

Most Palestinians and Israelis have 
concluded that we have gone too farin 
the peace process to tnm back, and 
that we must pul our faith in the 


future. Palestinian leaders who sup- 
peat the peace agreement dared to 
drink the hitter cup cf tdhng their 
people that they must pay a very tri^i 
price for achieving a secure future m 
their homeland, almost as hi gh as the 
one the mother was prepared to pay in 
King Solomon's court: sire would have 
given up hex child to save it 

We have the help of courageous and 
honest Israefi Jewish coQe^nes, exem- 
plary in their defense of mmnalrecc®- 
mfion. Yet many Israeli leaders, espe- 
cially among the politicians, reftise to 
tell their people that they nnzst reach 
out to the Palestinians; they have no- 
body else to rdy on in the long run. 

In Arabic we have a saying: “Even 
if your beloved rate were made of 
honey, do not suck it aff." There is a 

limit inthft f f yfimiiMy nf fog Palestin- 
ians, an ancient people with a rich 
legacy, as with any other people. But 
their endurance is their pledge of 
their belief in the future. 

We, Isrqpjjg and Palestinians, are 
already fated to be bom again as 
Siamese twins. We hope the rest of 
the world has already understood 
that true solidarity with one is contio- 


it on true solidarity with the other. 
: is no alternative. 

Palestinians and Israelis alike have 
a duty to stand up to our own extrem- 
ists. Yet the Israeli extremists are the 
real threat, not only to the peace 
process but also to the future of Israel 
itself. That much has been proved by 
the Hebron massacre. Israel needs to 
show by its actions that it can live in 
peace with the Arab wodd. 

It was Foreign Minister Shimon 
Poes, in his report to the Knesset on 
Baruch Goldstein's massacre at He- 
bron, who said; “Only God almighty 
knows the way out of what this 
rimnrteri man has done to us. The 
norms of peaceful coexistence have 
been frustrated and we should not 
underestimate the dangers.” 

God always knows. What is new is 
the encouraging beginning of recog- 
nition by Israeli leaders and the Is- 
raeli people that they can no longer 
hesitate to drink their own bitter cup. 

The writer, a novelist, was awarded 
the 1990 Jerusalem Medal for Pales- 
tinian literature. He contributed this 
comment to The New York Times. . 


Dependable Little Mr. Pluto Is Talking Dangerous Nonsense 


W ASHINGTON — “Let me ask you," 
says the cute tittle cartoon character 
newly appearing on Japanese television. 
"Do you have an image of me as something 
frightening? . . . There seem to be a lot of 
bad rumors about me." 

For the next 11 minutes, Mr. Pluto explains 
that among these “rumors" are that about 10 
kilograms of him could easily make an atomic 
bomb, that he is a deadly poison and causes 
cancer. To prove it, another character drinks 
glasses of plutonium-laced water until his 
stomach swells, then emerges from a rest 
room with a smfle. “Flush!" reads the cap- 
tion. "Refreshed, and feeling fine." 

Dependable Little Mr. Pluto explains that 
"although there are reports of cancer being 
caused as a result of exposure to radia- 
tion ... it is unthinkable that I could cause 
any adverse effects upon the body." 

This appalling piece of animated distortion 
is the work of Japan’s government-owned 
nuclear fuels corporation. It is an extreme 
of the dual thinking that the post- 
war plutonium glut has provoked in 
Japan, Britain, France. Germany, Russia and, 
through neglect, the United States. 

Governments watch America and Russia 
grapple with the huge task of dismantling their 
nuclear weapons and know that the U.S. Na- 
tional Academy of Sciences recently found that 
the resulting plutonium is "a dear and present 
danger to national and international security" 



symptom 
Cold War 


By Jessica Mathews 

fra which there are no good disposal options. 
Yet they cannot disentangle themselves from 
laid 30 years ago to use plutonium in 
t quantity fra making electricity. 

this is a hangover from the long-held 
belief that mere reactor-grade plutonium 
could sot be used fra weapons. Although it is 
now known that civilian phitomum makes a 
good enough bomb, there are still some die- 
hards asserting the old fiction. 

Thus, the paradox. If all goes well in the 
retirement of strategic weapons, as modi as 
150 tons of plutonium win be disposed of in 
the next 20 yens. At the same time, present 
plans for making phitomum through civilian 
r e pr o c e ssin g would produce 300 new tons of 
essentially the same stuff. This will be in 
addition to the 85 tons already stockpiled in 
Britain, France and Russia. (As you read 
these tonnages, bear in mind that less than 20 
pounds makes a nuclear weapon.) 

The worst part of this story is that this 
enormous new security burden is going to be 
produced for clients — nudear utilities — 
that don’t want iL The plutonium fuel cyde 
was designed when uranium’s cost was ex- 
pected to rise to $200 per pound. The price is 
now less than S10 and going nowhere. 

Utilities now know that the plutonium fad 
cyde — breeder reactors and reprocessing 



plants — win be ruinously expensive. No one 
company, however, has been willing to break 
ranks and say so. 

Without toe discipline of a bottom line, 
bureaucrats have ch 
the promise 
more fuel than i 
stood the failure of the rally commercial breed- 
er, France's Superphfarix, obvious drawbacks 
of safely and cost, and the deep public antipa- 
thy to shipping around the wodd hundreds of 
tons of material that is foe ultimate terrorist 
device and extremely toxic to booL 

It took a decade of debate in the United 
States in the 1970s to break foe grip of this 
holy grail on foe technical imagination. It is 
stiff alive and well elsewhere, although nearly 
every government is deeply divided. 

Proponents triumphed in Britain this 
month wbea a decision was made to turn on a 
new reprocessing plant foal has been in the 
works fra 17 years. The plant will be largely 
supported by reprocessing fuel from Japan- 

Japan, meanwhile, has been reconsidering 
its kmj’-standing plans. These would lead to a 
phitoaRtm stocmle so large that it ihas raised 
doubts about Tokyo’s nudear weapons inten- 
tions. Official leaks in foe past few weeks 
suggest that the Hosakawa government is scal- 
ing these plans way back, but will go ahead 
with the operation of a new breeder reactor 
and the construction of a reprocessing planL 

Britain and France — with more plutonium 


than they know what to do with already — 
know dial nrodi of Japan’s plutonium may 
never be shipped home, ana that they wifi 
probably be stuck with the high-level repro- 
cessing wastes as weff. But because their deals 
could withstand little public scrutiny, they 
resist any suggestion of alternatives. 

The united States is focused on weapons 
plutonium — on disman tling weapons, shut- 
ting down Russia’s three remaining military 
reprocessing plants and seeking an interna- 
tional agreement to ban plutonium produc- 
tion for weapons use. All of these are un- 
-questioned priorities. 

But since dvflian plutonium one day can be 
weapons plutonium the next, and because of 
the sheer amounts that will otherwise accu- 
mulate, the security benefits of these difficult 
steps will be overwhelmed if Chilian repro- 
cessing goes ahead on the planned scale. With 
hundreds of tons of plutonium in circulation, 
no matter how carefully guarded, it would be 
far easier to steal or buy a few bombs' worth 
than to go to the lengths to which Iraq and 
Neath Korea have been put 

As the weapons’ dismantles are teaming, 
the wodd can ill afford a single uxmeeded 
pound erf plutonium. The matter of civilian 
reprocessing needs to be joined — soon. 

The writer is a senior fellow at the Council on 
Foreign Relations. She contributed this com- 
ment to The Washington Fast 


Living Together: For a Humanism That Cares to Speak Its Mind 


s’ abjuration of “race mixing” 
no thing to do with indigenous 


C AMBRIDGE, Massachusetts — 
Gunmen burst into a Baha’i 
church in a South African township, 
line up the few white (Iranian) mem- 
bers of the congregation and shoot 
them dead. The Bahai religion holds 
that all races are one, and the Azan- 
ian People’s liberation Army, which 
apparently dispatched foe killers, 
said that it wanted to send a char 
message against foe mixing of races. 

In fact, the Azanian movement 
has been profoundly shaped by Eu- 
ropean racial thinking , as you migh t 
expea of a group foal borrows its 
name from an invented place of bar- 
barism in Evelyn Waugh's satiric 
novel "Black Mischief." The Azan- 
ians’ 
has 

local traditions and everything to do 
with the logic erf apartheid. 

"One mini on Arabs are not worth 
a Jewish fingernail," Rabin Yaacov 
Perrin said in a funeral eulogy fra 
Baruch Goldstein. The phrase reflects 
a perverse misreading of a passage 
from Exodus. But we have heard tins 
vcace before. It is Ibe voice of messian- 
ic hatred. We bear it from the Balkans 
to die bantustans; from Hezbollah 
and from Each. We hear it in the 
streets of Bensonhurst, New Ywfc 
And, of course, we hear it bran 
some who profess to be addressing the 
□usery of black America. "Never will I 
ray I am not an anti-Semite," said 
KhaHd Abdul Muhammad of the Na- 
tion of Islam. “I pray thai God will Jdff 
my enemy and take him off the face of 
the planet Earth." He is peddling time 
recordings of his speeches under the 
title "No Love for the Other Side." 

And so it goes, with the victimized 
b idding to be victimizers. That suf- 
fering ennobles is a lie, an old lie that 
has been exposed countless times yet 
has proved surprisingly durable. 

Mesaanic hatred is scarcely foe 
province of the privileged classes. 
David Duke draws Ms support from 
the least affluent and most anxious of 
white Southerners. 

Similarly, if calculating detna- 


By Henry Louie Gates Jr. 


gogues find inviting prey in black 
America, our immediate circum- 
stances make this unsurprising. That 
nearly half of African-American chil- 
dren live in poverty is rate scandal; 
another is amply that this fact has 
become an acceptable feature of the 
social landscape, as unremarkable as 
crabgrass. No love for the other side? 

Yet if profoundly anti-modern 
creeds like these continue to grow, 
pertaps liberalism — that political 
tradition of individual liberty that 
harks bade at least to the Enlighten- 
ment. — must shoulder some blame. 

For too long, liberalism has j 
accustomed to rescuing ' 
other people’s problems. Genital mu- 
tilation io Africa? Don't ask us to 
arbitrate among the mores of other 
cultures. Human rights abuses in 
China? Are we in a position to judge? 

Deference to the autonomy of oth- 
er beliefs, other vaioes, other cultures 
has become an easy alibi for moral 
isolationism. When we need action, 
we get band-wringing. When We need 
forthrightness, we get equivocation. 

What we have is a rhetoric of rela- 
tivism. But let us call such "moral 
relativism” by its real name: moral 
indifference. And let us admit how 
finite are our vaunted moral sympa- 
thies, here in foe comfortable West. 

According to recent reports, per- 
haps 100,000 people have died in re- 
cent ethnic conflicts that have raged 
through tiny Burundi Could any 
type of intervention have helped? 
Maybe not. But that isn't foe point. 
The point is that nobody is asking. 
Not enough love for (he Other side: 

Meanwhile, the tragedy of Bosnia 
has oonM to look like the Kitty Geno- 
vese syndrome on a global sole. 

We need a liberalism that has con- 
fidence in its own insights, a liberal- 
ism possessed of clarity as well as 
compassion. To creeds that prate of 
sacred fingernails, as the rabbi did, 
of “no love for the other side,” of the 
stnstof mixing ethnic or racial cate- 


gories, we must juxtapose a muscu- 
lar humanism — a humanism that is 
without arrogance and is unafr aid to 
assert itself, its hard-won moral 
knowledge. One that neither shuns 
religious devotion nor mistakes it- 
self for a religion. One that has cour- 
age as well as conviction. 

There is something of a paradox 
here. The most heinous of deeds have 
always been committed in foe name 
of future generations, of an awaiting 
utopia. The nature of these evils 
coaid not be concealed if they were 
committed in the name of our own 
interests in the here and now, but 


virtuous ‘‘sacrifice." Accordingly, it 
is its stoutly anti-utopian aspect — its 
capacity for self-doubt — foal liberal- 
ism has darned as a moral advantage. 

But the capacity to entertain un- 
certainty need not entail Hamlet-like 
paralysis. It merely promotes a will- 
ingness to revise our beliefs in the 
light of experience, to extend respect 
to those we do not agree with. 

Is it, after all, unreasonable to be 
suspicious of Westerners who are ex- 
ercised over female circumcision but 
whose eyes glaze over when the same 
women are merely facing starvation? 

Hie Azanian, the West Bank fanat- 
ic; the American demagogue march 
to a single drum. 

There has been much talk about the 
iitics of identity — a politics that 
s a collective identity as its core. 
One is to assert oneself m foe political 
arena as a woman, a homosexual, a 
Jew, a person of odor. But while the 
conversation may seem recent, the 
phenomenon is age-old. The politics 
of identity starts with foe assertion of a 
collective affiance. 

It says: This is who we are, make 
room for us, accommodate our special 
needs, confer recognition upon what is 
distinctive about us. It is about foe 
priority of difference, and while it is 
not. by itself, ud dearable, it is •— by 
itself — dangeroudy inadequate. 


By contrast, what I am hu- 
manism starts not with foe possession 
of identity, but with the capacity to 
identify with. It asks what we have in 
common, while acknowledging our 
diversity. It is about foe promise of a 
shared humanity. In short, the chal- 
lenge is to move from a politics of 
identity to a politics of identification. 

It was this conversion that Mal- 
colm X underwent toward the end of 
his life. If Louis Facrakhan, a bril- 
liant, charismatic man, undergoes a 
sunflar conversion, be wCQ earn a 

place in foe annals of our time. If not, 

he will just be another in a long line 
of radal danagogues.joiniiig rather 
Coughlin and Graald L K. Smith. 

A politics of identification does 
not enjoin us to ignore or devalue our 
collective identities. Fra it is only by 


exploring the multipHdty of human 
life in culture that we can come tc 
terms with the commonalities thai 
cement communitas. 

It is only by this route that we can 
move closer to what the poet Robert 
Hayden, himself a Bahai, conjured 
up when he urged us to “renew the 
vision of a hum an wodd where god- 
hness / is possible and man / is nei- 
ther god, ingger, hooky, wop nor kike 
' but man / permitted to be man." 

We may be anti-utopian, but we 
have dreams, too. 

The writer, chairman cf the Afro- 
American Studies Department at Har- 
vard U niversity, is author of the forth- 
coming “Cotersd People: A Memoir . " 
He contributed this comment to The 
New York Tones. 


EV OUR PAGES: 100, 75 AND 50 YEARS AGO 


1894: Hie Nice Regatta 

NICE — A fivriier sight ?han tha t 
presented by Nice harbor this morn- 
ing [March 29] it would be impossible 

to imagine. At six foe basin was so 
crowdrf that you could scarcely have 
found space for a one-rater. From 
that time until half-past nine it was 
one continuous procession of yachts. 
First went the big sailing craft, head- 
ed by foe Britannia, who were start- 
ing for the cruiser’s race to Monaco 
and back . . . The finish was one of 
those sights so dear to the yachtmans' 
heart, foe Britannia appearing over 
the horizon with every sail set . . . 
and with only one luff she marie the 
winning line. Soon after the Valkyrie, 
who came in on the dropping breeze, 
appeared in sight 

1919: SpartadstsRiot 

BERLIN — The whole of foe Ruin- 
valley is again in a state of unrest, 
brought about by foe Spuudst agi- 
- tators. The movement was caused by 


a conservative paper, which pub- 
lished a violent article concerning a 
workmen’s demonstration that took 
plare a day or two ago in the town of 
Witten. This demonstration ended in 
3 riot, fifteen persons being killed. 
Other disorders have occurred, many 
people being killed or figured. 

1944: Praise for Tito 

BARI, Italy — [From oar New York 
editionO A veteran of the Wcrid War 
Yfoo heads an American outfit whose 
Dalmatian operations are coordinat- 
ed under a senior British officer said: 
Having seen for ourselves, we have j 
the highest admiration for the accom- 
phshmems of Marshal Tito’s Yugo- 
slav patriots. They have helped us in 
wwy way possible. Our American 
soldiers have been under fire with 
both Yugoslav and British troops, 
and there is a complete understand- 
fog and confidence among the fight- 
ragmen of aff three nationalities. The 
raixed Allied fences along the Yugo- 
slav coast are a very happy famil y." 











INTERN AT IONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 

OPINION 


Pase* 


*. 4 * -r. 




Be M 


'JUtM 


'lr: 




?sonsemt 


Why the Sudden Reticence 
About the Korean Threat? 


N EW YORK - In the onenjnc 
statement at his prime- 

^"™ ce week, President Bill 
R^ton spoke about the nuclear crisis 
5ft North Korea. He spoke M *3? 
adding up to nothing. 

At that, he did belter than the Amen- 

« Un ? toward™ SlrfS 


% A. 1VL Rosenthal 


ton about anything but Whitewater. 

;ct c 7 ^ ^ WMSjwrated foreign jouroal- 
Kt said, Seflor Presidente, how about 
Russia and South Africa 7 
.. ™“ ^ ore *> H Presidente told him 
that the situation was serious, that the 
North Koreans could ma ke “many con- 

Ctinton has faced the fact 
that North Korea, is 
heading fast toward 
nuclear armament, bul he 
needs to do more to explain 
die threat to the public, 

tributions" to a united Korea — true 
enough but unlikely. Carefully uninfor- 
mative, the reply lacked the sense of 
danger and moment that the administra- 
tion itself feels. 

The American press came to dig into 
Whitewater — no trivial job. But if the 
president had wished he could have 
dealt with Whitewater and also seized 
the chance to create the national atten- 
tion the Korean crisis deserves and 
is not getting. 

All be had to say was what his foreign 
policy team believes: The dispute with 
North Korea is part of the most critical 
“foreign” problem the country faces, 
a sample of nuclear crises to come. The 
president’s goals are to prevent both war 
with North Korea and its military nucle- 
ar empowerment But after a year of 
trying he does not know whether the 
taut, isolated Communist government 
will let the United States achieve the 
second goal without losing the firsL 

So far, he has not laid out the crisis 
plainly and fully, as war-or-peace is- 
sues should be presented. Americans 
have the right to know exactly what is 
going on in any crisis that could lead 
to war — and how worried their gov- 
ernment may be. 

Americans do not yet seem to grasp 
the fact that war is now what the North 
Koreans are threatening. 

When dictators threaten war, believe 
them. In this century, dictators from 
Adolf Hitler to Saddam Hussein have 
fulfilled threats of war. — led- on 
by their power, their secret lusts and 
their vision of humanity as existing 
to be conquered. 

But if another Korean War is to be 
avoided without the. North getting the. 


prize of nuclear weaponry, the Commu- 
nists must understand thin the president 
is talking straight to Americans, alerting 
them to the risk as well as the goals. 

Specifically, Pyongyang must know 
he is telling his own country that North 
Korea might invade South Korea rather 
than give up dreams of Aria-wide power 
through nuclear weapons. 

Unless North Korea understands that 
the U.S. public is being told of the possi- 
bility of war, it may make the mistake 
that led to the Northern invasion of 
South Korea in 1950: the assumption 
that the United Slates would stay out. 

The strange thing about the presi- 
dent's reticence on the North Korean 
danger is that his administration has 
created a record that does it credit Mr. 
Clinton faced the fact that the North 
Koreans were hearting fast toward nu- 
clear armament, which Bushbaker did 
not. Then he tried to get North Korea 
to live up to its broken promises to 
permit full international nuclear in- 
spection. He offered diplomatic and 
economic rewards. Probably it was in- 
evitable that the Pyongyang dictator- 
ship, like all such, would see concilia- 
tory offers as weakness. 

But if be had not tried. President 
Clinton would have sacrificed in ad- 
vance the U.S. and international sup- 
port he will need if it conies to war, 
or the edge of war. 

But the president has not made clear 
to Americans what his own administra- 
tion believes. 

Preventing production of nuclear 
weapons by countries that would dis- 
tribute them to terrorist governments or 
terrorist movements, for profit or power, 
is the most important international 

S oblem in the wodd. For example: 
orth Korea to Iran to Hezbollah. 

Why the surprisingly laid-back public 
position toward a danger that in private 
makes Clinton administration experts 
sit up so veiy straight? 

when in doubt, pick the amplest an- 
swer. The president believes that it 
would frighten people too much if he 
spoke up about Korea more plainly. 
That is a mistake presidents lend to 
make — underestimating the public's 
desire, right and need to confront what- 
ever national dangers exist 
We are not talking about saber-rat- 
tling. The North Koreans are doing that 
load enough. What is needed from Mr. 
Qmton is amply adult talk to adult citi- 
zens, and mere than 10 careful words. 

The New York Times. 


Letters intended for publication 
should be addressed "Letters to the 
Editor” and contain the writer’s sig- 
nature. none and fuU address. Let- 
ters should be brief and are subject to 
editing We cannot be responsible for 
the return of unsolicited manuscripts. 


'HM' 








* 0 ? 


i age 

. tea ft i-IF.ui 


V 







-<G> 






LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 


Of Preference and Equality 

Regarding “ No Racial Reform on 
s Racist Basis ” ( Opinion, March 16) 
by Shelby Steele: 

Mr. Steele’s article fortifies an opin- 
ion 1 have held since the great idea of 
affirmative action (seek out the disad- 
vantaged, train, hire and promote with- 
out discrimination) was changed in 
America to preference by race. 

Mr. Steele, a distinguished African- 
American scholar, points out that racial 
(and other group) preferences are the 
generis of the divisiveness and hatreds 
which are so badly damaging the United 
States. I loathed white supremacy as a 
civil rights activist in segregated Geor- 
gia. But I never believed that this despi- 
cable form of racial prejudice could be- 
come the politically correct view if 
transmogrified into black preference. 

As Mr. Steele says: “This is a pattern 
of reform that calls out the Farrakhan in 
every group so they can be used as 
wedges in the group's negotiations with 
the larger society." 

Thus, the Ku Klux KJan. while seem- 
ingly the obverse of the Fanakhans. is 
derived, as Mr. Steele shows, from the 
same flawed philosophy. 

Yugoslavia is a model of what (with 
good intentions) some old fighters for 
racial justice are surely reproducing in 
the United States. 

MORRIS & ABRAM. 

Geneva. 

The writer is former vice chairman of 
the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. 

1 applaud Mr. Steele's courage in call- 
ing for (he repudiation of entitlements 
apportioned by race, sex or membership 
in any other group. It is ironic that 
America’s attempt to redress the wrongs 
of racism has fallen prey to a pattern of 
granting privilege based on race. 

As Mr. Steele so eloquently shows us, 
one problem with using entitlements to 


counteract past inequality is that they 
fail to address the underlying social 

J problems. Entitlements replace one 
orm of inequality with another. 

There is another problem: In a diverse 
or pluralistic society such America’s, enti- 
tlements serve to emphasize differences 
between people and oversimplify differ- 
ences of “identity." We all have many 
identities: religious, social cultural. 

We may choose to dwell forever on the 
unique suffering visited upon “our” 
group, or we may seek to transcend the 
particularities of that identity, to find a 
common humanity. The former approach 
is taken by the Loins Fanakhans and the 
Baruch Goldsteins of our world. The lat- 
ter approach, by which we try to find 
common interests — and often, common 
identity — is the only answer to the 
ethnic splintering and the hatred that 
sadly characterize American society. 

PETER MARK. 
Strasbourg, France. 

I am curious to know precisely what 
“entitlements by . . . sexual orienta- 
tion" are being lavished on the homo- 
sexual population in the United States. 
Gays are still routinely fired from jobs, 
denied insurance benefits, deprived of 
their children, and even beaten to death 
because of some heterosexuals' bizarre 
and ill-informed overreactions to then- 
natural sexual orientation. 

Some on the right would Hke to perpet- 
uate the myth that homosexuals are look- 
ing for and receiving “special treatment” 
in U.S. society. I think most gays would 
agree that the only “entitlements 7 ’ they 
want are equality before the law and the 
right to live their lives unmolested. 

DAVID APPELL. 
New York. 

Third World Care 

Regarding “ Cure Is Clear, but Europe- 
ans Dislike the Medicine ” (March 11): 
Articles such as this are. of course, 


In StillrQuaking California ¥ -- 
A Blessing or Two to Coun^ I 


written by people who do not have to 
worry about their own “social benefits" 
and “safely nets." Would they take jobs 
paying less than the minimum wage? 
I don’t think so. 

When “health care" and workers' 
rights in the United Suites become a 
little less Third World, then Americans 
can start lecturing Europeans. 

DENISE RYAN. 

Lddschendam, Netherlands. 

The Spin on China Trade 

The machine in action; The Cimtan 
administration has privately decided, h 
appears, to drop its contrived links be- 
tween human rights issues and preferred 
trade status. Headlines tdl off cffnKr secre- 
taries ctf stale expressing support for most- 
favored-nation stains for China; of busi- 
ness lobbies lambasting Secretary Warren 
Christophers diplomatic performance in 
Beijing; and of American businesses suc- 
ceeding in China. The calculated spin on 
political sentiment can be tiresome: 

It has become clear that Mr. Clinton 
will renew MFN status for China. This 
policy should have been adopted long 
ago. The administration should now redi- 
rect its priorities to account for the reali- 
ties cf Chinese- American diplomacy. 

STEFAN FRAZIER. 

A Bronx Cheer TaipeL 

Regarding “An Unpleasant Echo 
From a U.S. Name " (March 21) by 
Clyde Haberman: 

Flathush, mentioned in your article 
on Brooklynites in Israel, is in Brooklyn, 
not Queens, and has been since the 
Dutch settled the southern tip of Long 
Island in the 17th ceatmy. 

BERTRAM E SCHWARZBACH. 

Paris. 

Editor’s note: Mr. Sckwarzbach is cor- 
rect, and so was our correspondent. An 
editor’s error misplaced Flatbush. 


By Lou 

S ANTA MONICA, California — We 
are abandoning our ruined apart- 
ment here, forced out by the devastating 
earthquake that shook Southern Califor- 
nia Lwo months ago. 

My wife and I consider ourselves lucky 
because we have a home to go to near 
Santa Barbara. The same cannot be said 
for semes of thousands of people who lost 
bouses, apartments and personal proper- 

MEANWHELE 

ty in a disaster that has left a legacy of 
physical and psychological aftershocks. 

How many were made homeless? The 
number far exceeds original estimates of 
a few thousand. At least 50,000 people 
lived in residences that have been red- 
as uninhabitable by building in- 
spectors because of structural damage. 

Three or four times that number have 
been required to move out of apartments 
for up to a year while repairs are made. 

Our building was not condemned, but 
it looks as if it had been through an air 
raid — or the 1992 riots. Its conspicuous 
features are gaping holes in the walls, 
board ed-over windows and broken 
chimneys. When it will be rebuilt 
is anyone’s guess. 

Homeless statistics are a hopelessly in- 
adequate measure of this quake. Some 
people have lived with relatives since the 
quake and were never counted as home- 
less. Hundreds of thousands of people are 
still in homes that suffered serious dam- 
age. Surveys suggest that a million people 
had measurable loss. But only one-fourth 
of the homeowners and a handful of 
renters had earthquake insurance, on 
which a 10-percent deductible is stan- 
dard. Because of the high deductible, 
many of the insured win not collect a 
penny. The winners- are the insurance 
companies, which are faring better than 
they did after the hurricanes designated 
Andrew and Iniki, while the people af- 
fected by the quake are doing worse. 

Some companies have added insult to 
injury by classifying the recent 53 after- 
shock as a “new earthquake." requiring a 
new application of the deductible. 

The emotional impact of the after- 
shocks may be greater than the physical 
damage. One elderly woman carefully 
salvaged a handful of china miniatures 
from a large collection after the Jan. 17 
quake. She was philosophical about her 
loss. But she became depressed when 
almost all the surviving collection was 
wrecked by the March 20 aftershock. 

Similarly, a friend who spent $3,000 
on plaster repairs to his home is on the 
verge of giving up on Southern Califor- 
nia since the plaster cracked in the latest 
aftershock. He is convinced that the re- 
gion has entered a long cycle of quakes. 
“What’s the use of rebuilding?” he said. 

The earthquake, lest we forget, killed 
more than 60 people and doubtless 
would have claimed hundreds of addi- 
tional lives had it not struck at 4:31 


Cannon 

A.M. on a holiday. Most Southern C. ^ 00 
fomians were grateful courteous 
supportive at first. This cooperative a^ a >ut 
tude was gradually worn away by inflates 
and aftershocks, which left people jit!., tfbyi 
from worry and lack or sleep. | 

But the exodus from Los Angeles ‘’dtacSi 
was widely predicted has not occuit^j. or j 
Some even find silver linings, such as ]t 
construction workers who had been j„ tl op | 
less or underemployed since the Calilg 
nia economy went into the tank with 0 ^ £ j asS ff 
end of the Cold War. Nearly every ■-j ne i' Q Si 
pen ter, bricklayer or laborer who v._ ^ 1 

a job can now find work seven da;. ^ j a® 
week and nearly round the clock. „ ‘deB 
Other benefits abound. The quake i ,’32j 
a needed wake-up call to politician JPjissS 
Sacramento, the state capital who h ^ f\ 
accelerated a lagging schedule of r.. 5 ami 
forcing bridges and freeways. Real es: ngH 
is enjoying a mild and almost unnotiȤe fbel 
boom in riot-torn South Central Los bee s tsj 
gdes, an area little damaged by jlyiiin-, 
quake. So is rapid transit throughout «n 
region, although no one know* if the ns nri )m; 
preference for buses and trains wfli *n tl ; 
vive reconstruction of the freeways. Jeai 
And there are intangible benefits. faiste^ 
lerialisnv has taken a practical turn, 
illustrated by a friend who is geicatio 

married and hopes for gtfts of plasr. Ch 

dishes. People who no longer find acof th 
initiation worth the candle are givanto^ 
away once-prized possessions. Cnarwf tfafjg 
ble contributions have increased. havBj 
My wife and I often talked in Lhe ps tiflf 
about how hard it would be to leave tvis-Sf 
once-pleasanl apartment, where she 1 V 1 
lived for 17 years. It is a ruin now atoreBr 
not at all difficult to leave. rublP 

We fed lucky to have lived here. -m«3g 
Washington Post Writers Group. niseflF 


The FcbceofDisasf H| 

W E DEEPLY suspect that disastliffeBJ 
are The Man’s mighty rightnCubV 
payback for our human arrogance. hviriB 
see the footage and our hearts go out trn^f 
the victims in California- Then an inaomiBj 
voice says: This is for your Jacuzzis, la thV 
is for your past-life retail, this is for ycatioB’ 
sunglasses perched on top of the he” B 
during meetings at the Polo Lounge. B 
AD of us are sinners against Natu^^B 
We have been prideful by daring to eBSfe 
vate ourselves above the level of beaBWjj 
We have used technology to mnnipui; if 

and in some places destroy our enviri # 

meat; to clothe ourselves in fine ihretOB m 
that feed our vanity; to house ourselvesM || 
energy-wasting dwellings; to map the B 
netic code that organizes our tissues ajB m 
cells; to create collapsible police bate ££ 
that can be used to whack rival figilOO 
skaters on the kneecap. We are bad. \ an 
must suffer. This we know. nan 

There are ill winds blowing. Calamted uc 
is in the air. We have met the disastults o 
and it is us. st 9 

— Joel Achenbach, Washington Post. — 

do _ 


* - . - 1 ; • 








More than just a business head. 


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More than just business as usual. Raffles ; Class. 







You’ve been through your 
Sherlock Holmes was onro 


notes and you're ready. Time now to strike a different chad To put youisdf in t relaxed frame of mind (Maybe 


something with that violin of his.) In Raffles Gass we've creaied an atmosphere that's perfect for mulling over your 


next business move ... or contemplating a second cup of freshly-brewed coffee. The option is yours. You know how to apportion your time ... , 
just as our geode hostesses care for you as only they know how. With inflight service even other airlines talk abouL stnGAPORE‘Am3iEs 

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age 6 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY. MARCH 30, 1994 




taly Ri ghtists Take 
Ujsolute Majority 
n the Lower House 



5 ROME — Silvio Berlusconi and 
» » neofascist and federalist allies 
an absolute majority in tbe 
ilian Parliament on Tuesday, and 
med to the task of overcoming 
L lernal differences enough to be 
le to form a government 

I The Freedom Alliance consisting 
Mr. Berlusconi's Foiza Italia 
trty, the neofascist National AIK- 
ice and the federalist Northern 
sague won an absolute majority 
j 366 seats in the 630-seal Cham- 
t of Deputies, according to offi- 
al returns. The rightist coalition 
so won 155 of 315 seats in tbe 
mate, giving it a qualified major- 

Mr. Berlusconi, 57, the billion- 
re owner of a television, press and 
permarket empire, as well as the 
nan AC soccer team, won a per- 
nal victory in Rome, where he 
at the outgoing budget minister, 
jigi Spaventa, following a slick 
ade-f or- television campaign. 

Mr. Berlusconi pledged to work 
[ st to give Italy its 53d govem- 
3: ent in 50 years, but whether he 
£ odd be the head of it remained in 
Jubt because of divisions among 
# e Freedom Alliance partners, 
ji Umberto Bossi, the head of the 


Northern League, which wants rel- 
ative independence for tbe wealthy 
and industrialized north, lashed 
out at Mr. Berlusconi as someone 
who came “from the economic 
elites created and protected by the 
old regime.” 

The huge swing to the right gave 
the neofascists led by Gianfranco 
Fini their biggest victory since the 
time of Mussolini. “All of Italy 
knows we have finally won,” Mr. 
Fmi told cheering supporters, some 
of whom gave the stiff-arm Fascist 
salute 

Mr. Berlusconi appealed for the 
parties that campaigned together to 
stay together and form a govern- 
ment. 

The election was a disappoint- 
ment for the leftist Progressive Alli- 
ance, led by a reform Communist, 
Achille Occhetlo. The alliance, 
which also included Greens, an 
anti-Mafia party and a hard-line 
Communist group, trailed badly, 
with 213 seats in tbe Chamber of 
Deputies and 122 seats in the Sen- 
ate. 

The cento' alliance, containing 
the remnants of the once mighty 
Christian Democrats, won. only 46 
seats in the lower bouse. 



Mjbuoo Sanbocmi-Tbc AwciMd Prcw 


(Reuters, AFP, A?) Jubilant supporters of Silvio Berlusconi's Foiza Italia celebrating early Tuesday in Rome. 


A Tycoon Strikes a Political Gold Mine 


By William Drozdiak 

if Washington Post Service 

* ROME — He is often called a hybrid be- 
4 /eeu Rupert Murdoch and Ross Perot. But the 
<t ue character of Silvio Berlusconi, the Italian 
' edia tycoon, is hard to pin down, 
v Mr. Bedusconi, 57, who emerged as the most 
Sxninant political figure in Italy after his 
b? nee-party conservative alliance won historic 
kjjtioaal elections, regards himself as a self- 
Jj; ade man who rose from bong a crooner on a 
aa nise shi p to command a business empire with 
l|C 7 billion in annual sales. It includes three 
levision stations, mass-market magazines, 
P ist real estate holdings and Italy’s most suc- 
|5 ssful soccer team. 

[S Yet even though he portrayed himself to the 
ect orate as an innocent outsider in the man- 


19805 when he reaped huge dividends from his 
close friendship with Bettino Craxi, the Social- 
ist leader cow awaiting trial on corruption 
charges. 

In 1984, when Mr. Craxi became prime min- 
ister and pushed for deregulation of state televi- 
sion, Mr. Berlusconi acquired the three oom- 
merrial stations that would produce a financial 
bonanza and become the cornerstone of his 
empire. Since then, be has been addressed in the 
Italian press as Sua Enuttenza, or His Broad- 
castship, a pun on the title of Catholic cardinals 
addressed as Sua Eminenza, or His Eminence. 

During the same decade, Mr. Berlusconi ex- 
panded ins holdings under his Fminvest empire 
to include Italy’s largest advertising agency, 
Publitalia, the publishing house Mondadori, 
the huge supermarket chains Stands and Enro- 
mercato, the insurance company Mediolanum 
and the financial services firm Programma Ita- 


]> usiness and the do: 
Saver the past decade. 


ilitical hierarchy in Italy 


! The son of a Milanese bank clerk. Mr. Ber- 
isconi went into real estate after his university 
ays and plowed his father’s savings into tire 
instruction business. By the end of the 1960s, 
e hit the jackpot by making millions on a 
.. ituristic suburban housing complex for 10,000 
§1 eople called Milano II. 

&■ His real fortune, however, came in the early 


Business sources say Mr. Craxi also used his 
personal political fief in Milan to help ease 
zoning laws for Mr. Berlusconi's real estate 
projects in the wealthy Lombardy region. Mr. 
Beriusconi has not been charged with any 
crimes, but the tycoon’s brother Paolo was 
arrested in February and accused of paying 
nearly $700,000 in bribes to clinch the sale of 
three buddings outside Milan to a pension fund 
managed by Italy's principal state-owned sav- 
ings bank. 


In 1990, Mr. Craxi served as best man at Mr. 
Berlusconi's second marriage to Veronica 
Lario, an actress 20 years ins junior who has 
borne him three children. He also has two 
children in their 20s from an earlier marriage to 
Carla DalTOglio. 

Mr. Berlusconi also was a member of the P2 
Masonic Lodge, a clandestine dub of influen- 
tial politicians and businessmen that became 
embroiled in a murky plot dating back to the 
1970s in which the military and secret services 
were allegedly preparing a coup to thwart any 
partidpation in government by the Commu- 
nists. 

During the campaign, Mr. Beriusconi 
claimed his movement, Forza Italia, or Go 
Italy, became popular because it benefited from 
the spontaneous outbursts of citizens who were 
successful in private life and wanted to help 
purge the corrupt establishment by entering 
politics on their own. He insisted that all 267 of 
Forza Italia's candidates for parliament must 
have no prim political experience. 

Yet the quest for votes was conducted with 
modem professional trappings. Roberto Lasa- 
gna, a public relations specialist from tbe ad- 
vertising firm Samchi & Saatchi, was brought in 
to orchestrate the campaign. 

As a result of this extraordinary network of 
resources and people, Mr. Berlusconi was able 
to jump into politics only two months ago and 
still overwhelm the organizations of his rivals. 



I In Santiag6>{4*£ Compostela pilgrims find their rewards 


ob earth as well as in heaven. 


The Pilgri ni; Routes to Santiago still have much to offer « From the Pyrenees, — 1 "“r- 

you could strike south through La Rioja, or west passing through Pais" Vasco, • j I f 

Cantabria. Asturias, and ■ Galicia. Each of the routes providing an abundance L/-\ 
of unfoigettable-art and architecture. Like die beautiful Ilth century cathedra/ at Jaca and the great 
gothic cathedrals ‘in Burgos and Leon • For those intent on keeping body and soul together, the 
passage through tbe Culihairy delights of the Basque Country and Spain's wine-producing regions is a 
constant joy Audi, as the weary pilgrim finally enters the lush landscape of Galicia, the legend arc local 
seafood p ruyiiies -a climax to the loiigesi-est&blished “■tourist” route in Europe. I* 





Passion 
for life 


THESAKTHOO 
PILGRIM TRAIL 


ELCAMMODC 

SANTIAGO 


Of Crime and Punishment: 
Singaporeans Unleash Debate 

Court to Consider Appeal for U.S. Teenager 

Snd posLssmg SingapLrefbgs and vandalism in October. Of tee otb- 
STNGAPORE — i ne raseoi an fa^wdl gifts by a ere, two were American and two 

Amencan ftfend^ni paint was rfcmJred with Malaysian. There were also a Bel- 

sentence on a vandalism dbarae wiU gian, an Australian, a Thai and a 

go wan appeals hianflg before the interv ,._ tion ,w sinea- Hong Kong student 


aOUCUtAi UU am niMv— ■■ . - 

^ to S*p- 

hawroused strong emotions in "a P° re s Straits Times newspaper 
the West was a “hwrf' 'jgmt 
for conforming to slate controls. agned to go down well with me 
While the Sinaapore government American public, Mr. Clrnwn 
has said that ifwffl nSt be influ- said m npmse to a jwni^jt s 
enced by .American goremmem quKb°n that iheUmtedSiat^ had 
protests at the hareh punishment. a filed a strong^rotest wjh the Sm- 
agnificant number of Singapor- gapore authorities over the sen- 

Sf - bS “ Singapore government has 

gjnton that the penalty is out of taken the position that the law 
proportion to the offense. musl „ * ° bserved .JWjJ 

^ican understand if it’s for mur- eqnallytocitizeiisandforeignrea- 

der. but here bodily “Jgk said that of the 14 pec- 

s' Pie aged between 18 and 21 who 
3 were convicted of vandalism in Sin- 

trainee architect said. re coum ^ to 

Other Singaporeans, m private Sning in the last five years, 12 were 
conversation and m letters to the singaporeans and two foreigners, 
press, have : expressed similar senu- j^Hsien Loong, tbe deputy 


press, nare express^ smmarscau- ^ LooQg, tbe deputy 

meats, although views are clearly primc ^ ^ ^ it W0 ^J ^ 

da video. absurd if there were separate laws 

Some people strongly support for Americans in Singapore, 
the government in arguing that He said he saw no reason why 


caning is pari of a system of deter- “foreigners should be more thin- 
rence that has helped to make Sin- skinned” than Singaporeans about 


Malaysian. There were also a Bel- 
gian, an Australian, a Thai and a 
Hong Kong student 

Tbe Australian disappeared be- 
fore the police completed their In- 
vestigation. He is bdieved to have 
fled tbe country. 

Apart from Mr. Fay. only two of 
the other students were charged 
with vandalism and mischief. Ope, 
a Malaysian aged IS, is awaiting 
sentence. Tbe other, a Hong Kong 
youth aged 16, is undergoing trial. 

The case has caused widespread 
concern among the large foreign 
community in Singapore, especial- 
ly parents with teenage children 
who are worried that they may fan 
afoul of local laws that" are fre- 
quently much harsher than those in 
their home countries. 

Tire American Chamber of Com- 
merce in Singapore said its mem- 
bers woe “shaken" by the caning 
decision. 

In a statement, tbe chamber said 
it had always supported the Singa- 
pore government's “aggressive en- 
forcement of law and order” and 


be more thin- forcement of law and order” and 

^jporeans about bdieved it was one of the reasons 

gapore one of the safest and dean- caning. why Singapore was an attractive 

est cities in the world. One Singaporean letter writer to place to live and do business. 

Public opinion polls are seldom the Straits Tunes noted that in the “However, we simply do not un- 
condoned in Singapore and there United States, an innocent Japa- demand how the government can 
has not been one concerning the nese student was shot dead not condone the permanent scarring of 
case of Michael Peter Fay. 1 8, of Sl long ago while asking for directions any 1 8-year-old boy — American 


ITALY: 

Turbulent Right 

Continued from Page 1 

who had ruled without a break 
since 1948 in 52 coalition govern- 
ments. 

But tbe lurch to tbe right also 
raised alarms. While the aeofasdsts 
these days call themselves “postfas- 
cists” and have repudiated Musso- 
lini's anti-Semitic racial laws, they 
trace their lineage directly to the 
former dictator. 

Mussolini’s granddaughter, 
Alessandra Mussolini, won a place 
in parliament in her Naples constit- 
uency in the just-completed two- 
day election. 

For years, tbe neofasdsis have 
havered on the fringes of Italian 
politics, securing a steady 5 percent 
to 6 percent of the vote but no 
significant parliamentary represen- 
tation. 

Now, though, with the neofas- 
cists claiming to have won 105 par- 
liamentary’ seats — almost three 
times their share in the previous 
Parliament — and to have more 
than doubled their percentage of 
votes cast “it will no longer be Kke 
this,” said Eugenio Scalfari, editor 
in -chief of La Repubblica, which 
opposed tbe rightist alliance. 

BOSNIA: 

Short ' Shelf life ’ 

Continued from Page 1 
Croatian sphere of influence in 
Bosnia by forcing his Croat proxies 
iD Bosnia to agree to a federation 
with tbe Muslim-led government in 
Sarajevo. 

Other steps, however, remain. 
These include rewriting Croatia's 
constitution to represent the coun- 
try as a nation of citizens and not 
Croats first, and taking measures to 
ensure that the rights of Serbs, 
Muslims and other minorities in 
Croatia are protected in fact as well 
as in law. Compensation also 
would have to be made to the esti- 
mated 5,000 Serbs whose bouses 
have been burned by Croat gangs. 

Finally, in Bosnia, the govern- 
ment in Sarajevo has been persuad- 
ed to aid its military offensives in 
central Bosnia against Croat mili- 
tias and embrace a federation with 
its erstwhile enemies. Although the 
federation dilutes the power of the 
Muslim-dominated central govern- 
ment in Sarajevo, it creates a Bosni- 
an state that can exist either inde- 
pendently or in confederation with 
Croatia. 

Tbe first problem such a plan 
would face regards Serb intentions. 
Is the prospect of relaxed economic 
sanctions and an end to their inter- 
national isolation enough to entice 
them to settle for a chunk of Bosnia 
but not Croatia? And if Mr. Milo- 
sevic is convinced, is he powerful 
enough to deliver the Serb minor- 
ities of Bosnia and Croatia, whose 
forces have done well in the last 
two years of warfare? 

If the Croatian Serbs reject rule 
by Mr. TucFj man's government, 
many diplomats predict Mr. Milo- 
sevic wifl cut his substantial mili- 
tary and economic support to the 
region. Mr. Tudjman would then 
be left with one option — war. 

This problem has its echoes in 
Bosnia, too. 

The one great success so far of 
the recent diplomatic measures has 
been an agreement between Croat 
and Muslim factions in Bosnia to 
form a decentralized federation of 
ethnically based cantons. But suc- 
cess of the deal depends on whether 
the Bosnian Serbs hand over j 
enough territory to satisfy Muslim 
and Croat demands. 

Secondly, the Muslim enclaves 
of Srebrenica. Gorazdc and Zepa 
remain isolated in Serb-held terri- 
tory in eastern Bosnia. Trading 
them for territory in other parts of 
Bosnia would involve a population 
shift of tens of thousands of people, 
and a difficult political decision on 
the part of the Bosnian govern- 
ment 

Finally, in Bosnia, some critics 
of the peace plan say it lacks a 
scheme to use the influence of the 
UN and the West to limit the pow- 
er of the nationalist forces that set 
off die conflict in the first place. 


One Singaporean letter water to place to uve ana do business, 
the Straits Tunes noted that in the “However, we simply do not un- 
U nited States, an innocent Japa- demand how the government can 


case of Michael Peter Fay. 18, of Sl ion 
Louis. Missouri, who was sen- to i 
tenced by a lower court judge on his 
March 3 "to six strokes of the cane, i 


to a party, and a U.S. court found 
his {alter not guilty. 


March 3 to six strokes of the cane. There were many Japanese and 
four months in jail and a fine of Asians who were outraged by the 
3300 Singapore dollars ($2,100) af- findings, the writer said, “but we 
ter pleading guilty to two charges have to respect the decision of the 
of vandalism, two of mischief and U3. court and the prevailing val- 
one of retaining stolen property. ues of their society." 


any 18-year-old boy — American 
or Singaporean — by caning for 
such an offense, "it said. 

The chamber said it was impossi- 
ble to predict how the case would 
affect American business activity, 
but “it is likely to cast a cloud over 
Singapore's international reputa- 
tion. 


Southeast Asian Nations Press Case 
For Demilitarizing Spratly Islands 


International Herald Tnbune 

SINGAPORE — Southeast 
Asian countries, concerned that 
growing tension in Northeast Asia 
could roUI over into their region, 
called Tuesday for new measures to 
maintain peace and stability. 

President Fidel V. Ramos of the 
Philippines said that the six nations 
with competing claims to the Sprat- 
ly Islands in the South China Sea 
should demilitarize the area. 

At a news conference in Hanoi 
after talks with Vietnamese leaders, 
he urged that instead of maintain- 
ing armed forces in the Spratlys, 
the- claimants — China, Vietnam, 
Taiwan, the Philippines, Malaysia 
and Brunei — should cooperate to 
develop the region's resources to- 
gether. AH but Brand have sta- 
tioned troops on islands they occu- 
py- 

Mr. Ramos had earlier suggested 
a freeze on all “destabilizing activi- 
ties” and called for such confi- 
dence-bunding measures as marine 
research, environmental protection 
and joint development programs 
for oil, gas, fisheries and other re- 
sources in the South China Sea. 


A senior Philippine official said 
that Vietnam had responded posi- 
tively to the proposal to demilita- 
rize the islands, a scattered set of 
about 90 islands, atolls and reefs 
that hold tbe key to control of sur- 
rounding maritime areas. 

But analysts said it would be 
difficult to persuade aD claimants 
to withdraw their forces. Unless all 
agree, the plan will not work. 

China proposed several years 
ago that rival c laims to sovereignty 
be put aside in favor ofjoint coop- 
eration, but informal talks between 
the six countries on such a plan 
have made littieprognss. 

- Beijing, which claims much of 
tbe South China Sea, said recently 
that it would extend its administra- 
tive control by setting up “an inde- 
pendent oceanography body” to 
supervise the disputed islands as 
well as their territorial waters. 

In a speech to a security confer- 
ence in Canberra on Tuesday, Yeo 
Ning Hong, tbe Singapore defense 
minister, said that the dispute over 
the Spratlys and Noth Korea’s 
pursuit of a nudear capability were 
sources of tension in East Asia. 

He said that conflict between the 


United States and Japan over 
trade, and between the United 
States and China over trade, hu- 
man rights and democracy, could 
harm their political and "security 
relations. 

Faced with such uncertainties, 
he said h was as important today 
for countries in the region to main- 
tain a strong defense capability as 
it was during the Cold War. 

Defense planners in Southeast 
Asia say that with the collapse of 
the Soviet Union, U.S. defense in- 
terests in tbe area have diminished 
and need lo be supplemented by 
stronger regional security arrange- 
ments. 

Mr. Yeo said that recent pur- 
chases of .advanced fighters and 
warships, or plans to do so, b> 
Malaysia, Thailand. Indonesia and 
Singapore should be welcome be- 
cause this would help preserve se- 
curity in Southeast Asia. 

“If countries in this part of the 
world are unable or unwilling to 
take responsibility for maintaining 
peace and stability, no outside 
power will do the job for us,” he 
added. 

—MICHAEL RICHARDSON 


Both Koreas Strike Peaceful Tone 


SEOUL — President Kim 
Young Sam of South Korea took a 
conciliatory position Tuesday in 
the dispute over North Korea's nu- 
clear program, and a leading 
Northern diplomat said his side 
would not be tbe first to fight 

The softening of the language in 
the dispute came as Mr. Kim con- 
cluded a visit lo China, North Ko- 
rea’s most powerful ally. 

“Through consultation and dia- 
logue, I believe we can solve this 
problem smoothly,” he said at a 
news conference. 

In contrast to his recent warn- 
ings that South Korea’s patience 
might be running out, Mr. Kim 


said he would persist in efforts “to 
resolve this issue through dialogue 
and persuasion.” 

The South Korean president, 
who also has visited Tokyo to dis- 
cuss the crisis, urged China to play 
an active role in persuading North 
Korea to end its isolation and tbe 
confrontation on the nuclear issue. 

China, one of the five permanent 
members of the United Nations Se- 
curity Council, maintains that put- 
ting pressure on Pyongyang to 
force it to open its nuclear sites to 
inspection would be counterpro- 
ductive. 

Tensions grew rapidly last week 
as tbe increasingly defiant North 
repeatedly warned that interna- 


tional efforts to force inspection of 
its nuclear sites could lead to war. 

But on Tuesday a senior North 
Korean ambassador answered with 
an emphatic “no" when asked 
about the possibility of the North 
attacking the South. 

“We are defensive only,” Li Do 
Sop, Pyongyang's ambassador to 
Thailand, said at a news conference 
in Bangkok. “We have built many 
things. We don't want to destroy 
anything." 

South Korean officials say atiy 
punitive action without Chinese 
collaboration would be ineffective 
because North Korea gets tbe bulk 
of its energy imports from China 
and does not depend on any other 
supplies. 


SUMMIT: Tense South Africa Postpones Peace Talks 


Continued from Page 1 

violence here and in Natal, that a 
“substantially free and fair” vote 
could not be held next month. 

Archbishop Desmond M. Tutu, 
the 1986 Nobel Peace Prize laure- 
ate, added his voice Tuesday to the 
growing call for the election to pro- 
ceed, despite the growing volatility 
of the campaign. "The elections 
must happen, " he said “I believe 
the situation.'' if the elections are 
postponed, “will be disastrous." 

The police revised upward their 
death toll from Monday’s violence 
to 53 as they counted tbe dead from 
dozens of confrontations that oc- 
curred throughout the day. 

Zulu marchers themselves ap- 
pear to have been tbe provocateurs 


in some of the deadly confronta- 
tions with ANC supporters, partic- 
ularly when they set up barricades 
roads leading to the city and 
blocked commuters from going to 
work. 

But in the two worn incidents in 
central Johannesburg, the march- 
ers appear to have been on the 
receiving end. Numerous witness 
said that the trouble began at Li- 
brary Gardens, the small park 
where the march terminated, when 
sniper fire from unknown assail- 
ants rang out from a building or 
buildings around the park. Five 
people were killed there. 

TTie gunbattle outside Shell 
House left eight marchers dead and 
20 wounded near a rear entrance to 


the building where the ANC has 
offices. The ANC claimed its secu- 
rity personnel fired in self-defense 
when tbe budding was in dang er of 
bring invaded. 

But the police said they found no 
automatic weapons on the dead 
and wounded in that incident, most 
of whom were hit automatic weap- 
ons Ore from the ANC. The ANC 
suffered no casualties in the inci- 
dent Some witnesses said ANC se- 
curity aides frred on the mar chers 
from a balcony on the floor above 
street level, at a time when no one 
was in a life-threatening situation. 

A police detective sought to en- 
ter the ANC headquarters building 
Tuesday to search for weapons, but 
the ANC did not let him in. 


The House of Lords Shuts the Door 
To Opponents of Sunday Shopping 

Reuters 

LONDON — Britain’s upper house of Parliament, the House of 
Lords, voted Tuesday to accept reforms to let stores open on 
Sundays in England and Wales. 

The House of Commons voted in December for a compromise 
that would let shops open on Sunday, but restrict major supermarket 
chains to six hours of trading. 

The vote by the Lords, which could have overturned the December 
lower bouse decision, brought to a close a long-running battle over 
the issue, with opponents saying Sunday shopping would rain this 
officially Christian nation’s one day of rest- Tbe bill now will become 
law. 

Sunday trading has been allowed In Scotland and Northern 
Ireland for some time. 


Leakey Successor Takes 
Wildlife Post in Kenya 

Agencr France- Pretse 

NAIROBI — President Daniel 
arap Moi named a conservationist, 
David Western, on Tuesday to re- 
place Richard Leakey as director of 
Kenya’s Wildlife Service, an offi- 
cial statement said. 

Mr. Western, 50, a Kenyan citi- 
zen, has a zoology degree and is 
author of a several of works on 
conservation. Mr. Moi, after first 
refusing ; Mr. Leakey's resignation 
over policy differences, finally ac- 
cepted it last week. 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 


Page 


^ ma g e of a Black Jesus Is Spreading Through African-American Churches 


By Laurie Goodstein 

*'*skinf>roa Pan Service 

Black Chris, to- 
a Ppeanng m stained-glass win- 
?^ sta . n,es * *nu«ls and paSgHi 


ian kente doth outfits are replacing Eas- 
ter frocks and somber suits. 

Preachers stress the place of blacks in 
the Bible, drawing from more than a 
dozen recent books published on the sub- 


. , — , — ouu pain an as m uuivimu, 

church frrai New Jersey to California, j*®*- hie Original African Heritage Study black Christ images 
i ne trend signals a change much deeoer Bible, a King James version with photo- Bishop Henry McN 


^We look at this as a mainr ma™ 

SS , " 1 ®j| 4 Maurice Jenkins,^ an aSa 
TThe slave trade took away our culture 
and our rebg,on, and now t4 is a namS 

EXT lhe bUck «*“«» “SS 

£ a t" ncan “**- to «, 

The Afroceotxic approach which 

AMqi ai the h£5Trf htaoJ3 
culhn^ shunning the Western Was to- 
ward Europe as the cradle of civilization 

cWh~.fr 8 adopted by individual 
churches of many denominations in a 
variety of ways. Entire congregations 


graphic re-enactments of Bible semes us- 
ing black models, has sold about half of 
the 300,000 copies in print. 

Drummers and guitarists spice up mu- 
sical offerings, accompanying and some- 
times even replacing the church organist. 

Choirs wearing robes trimmed with kente 
doth sing m asing gospels in previously 
staid Catholic and Pentecostal services. 

The impact of these changes is still 
being felt, but one is already dean Some 
blacks who dismissed Christianity years 
ago as a “white man’s religion” are now 
returning to church. 

The concept central to all these 
changes in churches is the shift away from 


for church dressed in African thinking of Jesus as white. Jt has long 


nnery on African Awareness Sundays.' 
even at regular Sunday services, Ghana- 


been tradition in churches throughout the 
world for imag^ of Jesus to mirror the 


faces of the faithful Jesus is often depict- 
ed in Latin America as Hispanic, in Asia 
as Asian and in Africa as black. 

churches of the African Methodist 

Episcopal denomination have accepted 
black Christ images for 100 years, since 
Bishop Henry McNeal Turner first ut- 
tered the words “God is a Negro." 

The difference now is that Afrocentric 
scholars are fast popularizing research 
that they say proves that the “Jesus of 
history” was a man of color, an “Afro- 
Asiatic Jew." Ministers who say they 
would have been uncomfortable having 
black Christ images in their churcltts 

even five years ago now do so, saying such 
depictions axe “historically accurate.” 

In 1970, the graduating dass of How- 
ard University School ofDivinity tried to 

E l the school with a picture of a 
Christ recalls the Reverend Willie 
Wilson, then senior dass president 
“They refused to display it,” Mr. Wil- 
son said. “Back then jt was Just anathe- 
ma. That was the height of the first wave 
of strong African and black conscious- 


ness in the African-American communi- 
ty” He added; “People wore Afros and 
flashikis and read some books, but it was 
superficial It wasn't internalized.” 

Now “it’s much deeper," said Mr. Wil- 
son, pastor of Union Temple Baptist 
Church, one of the strongest examples of 
an Afrocentric approach to religious life. 

Howard's Divinity School has become 
one of the centers of black scholarship, 
home to such professors as Calq Hope 
Fdder and Kelly Brown Douglas, author 
of the new book “The Black Christ.” 

Mr. Fdder, author of the book “Trou- 
bling Biblical Waters; Race; Hass and 
Family." has spoken at dozens of church 
workshops and seminars since the publi- 
cation last year of the African Heritage 
Bible, for which he edited the essays on 
the presence of Africans in biblical rimes. 

Mr. Felder says Jesus of Nazareth was 
an “Afro-Asiatic Jew” who “probably 
looked like a typical Yemenite, Trinidadi- 
an or African-American of today." 

He finds proof for this in biblical pas- 
sages. such those in Matthew where the 


“angel of the Lord" commands Joseph to 
take Mary and Jesus to hide in Egypt 
“Imagine the divine family as Europeans 
hiding in Africa!” Fdder writes in the 
Bible’s introduction. “This is quite doubl- 

Among academics, Mr. Felders ideas 
are not widely accepted or even known. 
Robert Funk, chai rman of the Jesus Sem- 
inar, a roundtable of New Testament 
scholars, said most scholars accepted that 
Jesus, a Jew, was a Semite, “swarthy in 
complexion," but hardly blade. 

Mir. Funk had never heard the term 
“Afro-Asiatic Jew." He la ug hed and said: 
“I suppose well lx claiming n ffX T that he 
was a woman Or that he was Asian. Or 
that be was Native American. The possi- 
bilities are unlimited ," 

Stephen Mitchell a biblica l scholar 
said: h If 1 woe black. I would d efini tely 
be talking about Christ as black. I am 
very much in sympathy with this desire to 
show that Jesus was one of us.” 

But there is “oo validity" to the conclu- 


sion that Jesus in history was black, said 
Mr. Mhchefl. author of “The Gospel Ac- 
cording to Jesus.” The Gospels provide 
no infonnadon about the ancestry of 
Mary, who as the virgin mother of Jesus 
provides the only relevant genealogy. 
And if Jesus looked any different than an 
ordinary Jew, the accounts would have 
made mention of it as in the references to 
the Ethiopian eunuch, he said. 

Mr. Mitchell added: “1 think it is very 
important to respect the truth with all of 
our hearts. Once you let your desire be- 
come more important than the truth, you 
get into real trouble. You have people in 
pre-Nazi Germany writing about Jesus as 
a blood-haired Gentile. It’s very danger- 
ous to rake your desires too seriously.” 

Some churchgoers ask why it matters 
what color Jesus was. 

Kelly Brown Douglas, of Howard, bris- 
tles at that question. 

“If you aren't able to see God In your- 
self and yourself in God, then yon can’t 
see yourself as a child of God,” she said. 


OAS Chief 
Proposes 
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After a Pullout, Main Mexican Party 
Picks Economist for Presidential Run 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispeicha 

MEXICO CITY — Mexico's 
governing Institutional Revolu- 
tionary Party said Tuesday that it 
had chosen Ernesto Zedillo Ponce 
de Leon, a Yale-trained economist 
and former education minister, as 
its candidate in the August presi- 
dential election. 

The announcement was made a 
few hours after the other leading 
contender, Fernando Ortiz Arana, 
withdrew. 

Mr. Zedillo had run the election 
campaign of Luis Donaldo Colo- 
sio, the party’s presidential candi- 
date, who was assassinated by a 
g unman Wednesday in the north- 
ern city (rf Tijuana.’ 

Mr. Zedillo is a strong supporter 
of President Carlos Salinas de Gor- 
lin's free-market economic poli- 
cies. The Mexican stock market ral- 
lied earlier on rumors that Mr. 
Zedillo would be named the PRI 
candidate. 

“We are convinced that Zedillo 
is the best” candidate, said Mr. 
Ortiz Arana. 49. president of PRTs 
national executive committee. “We 
are sure be has the courage and 


conviction to continue along the Gonzfilez de la Vega. But be insisi- 
patb started by Luis Ocoaldo Co- cd therc was no wide conspiracy, 
losio." 

Mr. Ortiz Arana said he did not 
want to split the party, which has 
never lost a presidential election. 

Like Mr. Colorio. Mr. Zedillo is 
viewed as a moderate within the 
party, which has been strained by 
tensions between its reformist and 
traditional wings over political re- 
form. 

Like Mr. Salinas, who is forbid- 
den by law to succeed himse lf, Mr. 

Zedillo is a former secretary of pro- 
gramming and the budget, 
he left for the education depart 
mentin 1992. 

Mr. Zedillo, who has never ran 
for public office, had resigned the 
education post to manage Mr. Co- 
lorio's campaign. 

The government said Monday 
that a retired security guard hired 
to help in crowd-control at a cam- 
paign rally for Mr. Colorio in Ti- 
juana was suspected of helping in 
the assassination. 

Others also may have been in- 
volved in the killing, according to a 
statement by the deputy attorney 
general fra* investigations. Rend 


New York Times Service 
BOGOTA — President C£& 
Gaviria Trujillo of Colombia sa; 
his main objective as the new Iead> 

(rf the Oiganization of America S 001 1 
States wili^e to create a single fro « Lres ' 
trade zone for countries in tf 
Western Hemisphere. 

Mr. Gaviria, who was just elec 
ed secretary-general of the groui 
said in an interview; “We want tl 
different trade agreements in tl , „ 
continent to converge into one sit 
gle process, under equal coad 
tions. We want to create a ring! 
larger free-trade zone.” 

In addition to the economic i 
sues, he addressed the issues » 
bringing the organization up i 
date in the post-Cold War wor) i l 
and cooperation in fighting ti • . 

drug trade. L f* 7 

He said be would encourage n 
form of the OAS, which has bee i w , 
widely criticized as increasingly ii j- OD . . 
effectual It lost prestige when } 

The government repeatedly has was unable to persuade Haiti's mi 
masted that Mr. Cotosiowas killed ilai Y government to agree on tl 

return to power of President Jeai 


[mi 


r ine major mcxico u 

®* per H Universal pubhs 
graphs showing Mr. C 
te ** rl " mats before he was 


by a lone gunman. Mario Aburto 
Martinez, 23, a plastics factory me- 
chanic, confessed to the killing and 
is in custody. 

Mr. GaxnAlez identified the sec- 
ond suspect as Tranquflino S&n- 
cfaez Venegas, who he said was 
hired the day of the campaign rally 
by a local PRI boss. 

The major Mexico City newspa- 
lbhshed photo- 
Colosio mo- 
was shot and 
suggested that a man near his secu- 
rity chief could have been involved. 

It identified the man in the pic- 
ture as Mr. SAnchez Venegas and 
said be was a member of Mr. Colo- 
sio’s security detafl. The papa - sug- 

the campa^ rally crowd 
for the gunman. 

Him of the shot being fired to 
Mr. Coiosio’s head was shown on 
the Mexican TV network Televisa. 
But the videotape did not clearly 
tbow the assassin. (AP, Reuters) 


Bertrand Aristide; who was ouste 

in a military coup. 1 

“It is not that the organizalio 
has been debilitated," said Mr. Gt 
viria. “But with the ending of tb; 
Cold War and the change m into 
national realities, the nature of th . 
hemisphere’s problems havi 
changed. That is what makes th'| 
organization look outmoded vis-i 
vis these new realities.” 

Last year, Colombia restore 
diplomatic relations with Citix 
ending 11 years of estrangemex 
that began when Bogoli accuse 
Cuba of training and aiding Cc 
lombian leftist rebels. Mr. Gavin 
has since sought to increase link 
with President Fidel Castro. 

When asked about the differ 
ences between his stance on Cub 
and Washington’s, Mr. Gaviri 
said: “A0 of ns in America trust 
that Cuba will undergo economi 
and political changes that, in tbj 
future, will permit its remiegraf' ~ 
to the inter-American system.” 


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•sv. • 


iteniational Herald Tribune 
Wednesday, March 30 > 1994 
age8 


ONDON THEATER 


STAGE /ENTERTAINMENT 


Rediscovered Masterpiece 
)f Victorian Sex Warfare 


By Sheridan Morley 

International Herald Tribun e 

L ONDON — It's a curious reality of 
the current London theater that 
whereas the major subsidized compa- 
nies all have so-called literary depart- 
mts, the great rediscoveries are nearly always 
ide on the minjnmi resources of the fringe 
airy Arthur Jones’s “The Case of Rebdfious 
san.” written a century ago, should long 
ice have turned up on a National or RSC 
nri through late Victorian theater, bat it has 
en left to the ever-enterprising Sam Walters 
the Orange Tree in Richmond logo down to 


lenry Arthur Jones, in 
ie 1890s , was a wore 
opular playwright than 
ither Shaw or Wilde. 


s local library and turn up a period piece of 
nnense fascination. 

Jones was in the 1890s a more popular play- 
right than either Shaw or Wilde, despite the 
Duble he got hims elf into for rewriting Ibsen’s 
\ Doll's House” with a “happy" ending 
hereby Nora returns to the family fold. For all 
at, he was radical enough to suggest, in “Su- 
n,” that there was something a little awry 
ith a society which always forgave a faus- 
ind's infidelity but regarded a wife’s as unfor- 
vahle. 

In the first moments of his drawing-room 
imedy of manners. Jones sets up the dilemma: 
ady Susan, having discovered her husband's 
fidelity, decides to head for Cairo and “pay 
.m back in his own kind.” 

Jones, given the climate of the tunes and 
inlands of his first producer, was canny 
tough to leave us in the dark about what 
xdsely happens on the Nile. But his debate 
iges across three acts of guarded sexual war- 
je, in which every point of view, from the 
lauvinist to the suffragette, gets a character to 
>eak up for it. Malcolm Sinclair is perfectly in 
sriod as the lawyer-unde who has to hold the 
Lmily together as moral absolutes crumble all 
-ound hun with the turn of the century and the 
iming of the new woman. Ainiol Smith’s pro- 
action is an el egan t masterpiece of period 
etafl. 

At a time when all too many West End 
leater managers are turning over their stages 
i stand-up comics who do little mot than 
.•peat their television monologues at the micro- 
hone for audiences paying up to £30 a ticket, it 
jems more than usually perverse of my critical 
olieagues not to have given a much wanner 
'dcome to Pan! Merton who, at the Palladium, 
as at least had the grace to fashion an entire 


show around that temple of derelict vaudeville 
rather than just do the usual routine. 

Merton has rightly perceived that the Palla- 
dium used to be a muric hall rather than mua- 
cal hafl, and his act is a weird and wondrous 
tribute to the great days of the poodle act and 
men who used to fill the stage with flags. Where 
else would you now get to see “The Dam- 
Busters” entirely re-enacted by rabbit glove- 
puppets, or a bizarre tribute to the worst of 
1960s pan tommies entirety cast with television 
stars nobody had cm- heard of even then? 

One of Merton’s best and most surreal no- 
tions is that of the poodle act; his poodles 
having unfortunately been killed in a horren- 
dous car smash, be presses an regardless with 
their routine having first reassured us that it is 
whax the poodles would have wanted, in the 
best traditions of the show going on. Some of 
his other skr-tchcs are very sketchy indeed: 
Merton is so laid back as to be horizontal, bat 
his rage at discovering the Russian comic he has 
been hired to interpret is is fact stealing his own 
act remains joyous. Like all the great comics he 
doesn't just act, he reacts to the chaos of the 
world around him, and he has elevated the 
shrug to an art form of its own. 

Y OU’D be well-advised to time your 
arrival at “Hot Shoe Shuffle” (at the 
Queen's) far the interval The first 
half is just awful but the second is 
unmissable. Originall y conceived and staged in 
Perth (Western Australia rather than Scotland), 
David Atkins’s celebration of tap dancing 
starts disastrously with a plot about seven 
dan ring brothers and their Amazonian sister 


(Rhonda B urchin ore) trying to claim a legacy 
by performing the show their father always 
wished to see. 


Rehearsals and makeup are terminally bor- 
ing, but about 10 minutes into Act 2 they raise 
the curtain on the big band and for 40 following 
minutes the stage comes alive as number after 
Broadway and Hollywood number is given the 
tap-dance treatment fay a breath takingly agile 
team, aQ of whom seem to be in training for the 
□ext Tap Olympics. There's no real show here, 
but the dancing is iost tremendous. They 
should take it around the world on ocean liners. 

It Is perhaps not coincidental that both the 
producer of this show and the owner of the 
theater where it plays are Australians, for 1 
doubt that a more local management would 
have run its risks. It’s essentially an exhibition 
of the various forms of tap, put together in a 
city starved by thousands of miles of any real 
show-biz traditions. 

In that sense, “Hot Shoe Shuffle” is really a 
cabaret, but cabaret like satire is renowned for 
not selling at West End prices. Hence the lame 
and halting attempt to throw in (and then out ) 
the family-legacy pIoL As for the score, it is an 
uneasy mix of Duke EDmgtoo, Irving Bolin 
and a dozen others from the golden years of the 
American musical, songs an chosen for their 
tapping potential and not necessarily the better 
for that 


The card 
that speaks your 
lano'iiaii'O. 


* 



• 

M 




WorldCupUSmm 


In Focus: 
Europe s 



ics 



The Sound 
Under 
The Sonnd 

For Pat Metheny, 
Silence Is Awful 


Agnieszka Holland was chief adviser v-p* t mi f 
at the screenwriters seminar. V- k'f .j'a: ■ 


By Joan Dupont 

B ORDEAUX — Jeanne Moreau, 

president ctf Funding 

Board, emitted a terse verdict: “If 

some of the people who wrote those scripts were 

carpenters who made chairs, we’d all be on our 
rear ends.” Moreau was addressing the Gist 
session of Equinoxe, a screen-writing workshop 
modeled after Robert Redford's Sundance Insti- 
tute and launched last fall near Bordeaux. Now 
a spring term, co-produced by Equinoxe founder 
Noetic Descbamps and the Canal Plus pay-TY 
network, has assembled another international 
team of young filmmakers and marched them 
with seasoned advisers. 

Chateau Beychevdle, where the workshop 
took place, is near Margaux and just about as 
far from Redford's Utah ski lodges as you can 
get, but the ambience was heady, helped per- 
haps by the good wine. There was talk about the 
ills of European ci nema and movies with au- 
teurs but no plots that miss their audiences and 
lose out in the international market. 

If Moreau was frank, Agnieszka Holland, 
chief adviser at the spring session, was brutal 
“There’s a big difference between the American 
approach and the European approach,” she 
said. “In the U. S, cinema is an industry, with 
real screenwriters. Here it’s more individual 
expression — aside from one or two names. 
Fiance has no screenwriters; directors have 
nobody to mite for them.” 

A Polish filmmaker who has written screen- 
plays for Andrzej Wajda, Holland knows both 
systems wdL Her “Enropa, Europa” (Golden 
Globe) and “Olivier, Olivier” (an Oscar nomi- 
nation for best screenplay) were European- 
made. Her latest, “The Secret Garden,” the first 
film she did not script was produced by Fran- 
cis Ford Coppola’s American Zoctrope. shot in 
England and is now bong released in Europe. 

A small woman of towering energy, Holland 
was wearing a bulky sweater over tights and 
running shoes as she sprinted through the cha- 
teau’s stately halls, taking on screenwriters one- 


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on -one, and pairing pungent remarks on cul- 
tural differences. 

“Among the young screenwriters here — 
American, French, English end T p<h — the 
Anglo-Saxons are more aware that the script is 
a necessary stage of the work to communicate a 
story to an audience: the French are mare 
personal and, in a way, pretentions; it’s like 
somebody who already shot the movie in his 
head and the images are so beautiful he doesn’t 
want to chang e any thing . French art is mare 
lyric, and the Anglo-Saxon tradition is in the 
tradition of EngHah theater — more realistic 
and objective. 

Tm closer to English-speaking cinema than 
to French, in terms of storyteHing. My films are 
more successful in the U. 5. than France. I: may 
be a question of my temperament and life 
experience. I fee! dose to Jewish culture and a 
big part of American culture, especially in New 
York, is Jewish — Tm not just thinking of 
Woody Alien, but of the kind of East European 
Jewish sensibility that made great American 
cinema in the ’30s and ’40s. 

“Polish col tore is very thin, built mostly from 
opposition to oppressions of the last 200 years. 
Now, people are trying to find their roots. I 
spoke to Wajda about this because we enjoy 
Chinese cinema — you fed the deep strength of 
the culture — and there hasn't been that kind of 
explosion of expression in the Fagtem Europe- 
an countries.” 

Holland, born in Warsaw, has a long history 
as a political outcast. Since her teens, every 
decade has meant a move to a new culture mid 
language. At 17. because of her father’s politics 
and tragic death, she left the country an<f stud- 
ied at the Czech Film Academy. After Dubcek’s 
fan, she was obliged to leave and retained to 
Poland. In 1971, she joined Wajda’s film collec- 
tive. “I had been blacklisted and he fought for 
me. We became friends; he produced my first 
movie.” She collaborated on Wajda's screen- 
plays, from “A Love in Germany” to the recent 
“Doctor Korczak.” After martial law was pro- 
claimed in 1981, she came to France. 

Recently another friend working in France, 
Krzysztof Kieslowski named her as consultant 
on “Trois Couleura: Bleu, Blanc, Rouge.” 
“Krzysztof is my closest friend among direc- 
tors. We help each other informally; the time, 
be wanted to do it more formally, so we met for 
three days when his treatment was ready, then 
when his first draft was ready. We hdd a kind 
of workshop; in a way, we did what we are 
doing here.” 

At Equinoxe, each adviser reads every script 


0 grid tanfSyim 

and spends time with each writer, giving ideas, 
listening to explanations. “After a week, the 
guy has the opinion of nine p rofessionals; if 
he’s smart, he’d get something from it And the 
experience has been good for me, because when 
I speak with young people, Tm thinking about 
myself and my own work.” 

Holland can get riled about “autistic and 
egocentric” European movies: “Die problem is 
not that they are for smaller audiences; the 
problem is drat they are for nobody. European 
cinema is committing suicide . You have a sys- 
tem of subsidies ana promotion that is neces- 
sary, but it can undo the filmmakers’ sense of 
responsibility. In Germany, more than 100 [fea- 
ture and TV] movies are made a year; only five 
can touch an audience:” 

In Berlin, Holland taught filmmakers Mice the 
Haitian Raoul Peck: “He’s a good example, 
interesting and smart Some of i he German 
gays seemed more spectacular, bat Peck has 
something to say.” 


T ODAY’S filmmakers, she feds, suffer 
from an identity crisis that is at die 
root of European society; “The gener- 
ation before went through the war, 

mimiiu nism and f a<ricm | hn npgnfl iticactw This 

generation has no real problems and nothing to 
say — they haven’t found their sutgect and have 
no real co nn ection with their n’me Some tim ei, 
the first films are good, and then they get sterile, 
like Peter Greenaway. The movies that survive 
are the ones with strong social Teding, like mov- 
ies by Ken Loach or Mike Leigh.” 

There were times daring the session when 
Holland found herself defending European 
films: “I’m more open than the Americans here 
who can’t understand how the pace can be so 
slow; I'm educated in this tradition. I love slow 
pace; hot now Tm getting a little impatient. 
Making a movie is communication: 1 want to 
tell the story and to reach different audiences.” 

The offer to direct “The Secret Garden” 
came about during the Golden Globes award 
for “Enropa. Europa.” “The moment was ripe 
to do something with an American studio, but 1 
knew how difficult it would be. It had to be a 
special sutgect to keep relations good and keep 
control over the movie. I would never do a 
movie Hke ‘Olivier, Olivier’ with a studio; it's 
mare somber and complicated. Making a movie 
like that without having final cut and depend- 
ing on what happens during sneak previews — 
that’s very dangerous.” 

Joan Dupont is a Paris-based writer specializ- 
ing in the arts. 


F 


BOOKS 

JACK’S LIFE: A Biography 
of Jack ftidbolsoo 

By Patrick McGiUigan. Illustrat- 
ed. 478 pages. $25. W. W. Nor- 
ton. 

Reviewed by Christopher 
Lehman n-Haupt 

T17HAT comes as a small sur- 
YY prise in Patrick McGifligan’s 
imermttentfy engrossing “ Jack’s 
Life: A Biography of Jack Nichol- 
son" is that the screen actor’s ca- 
reer did not begin with his perfor- 
mance as George Hanson, the 
alcoholic Southern small-town law- 
yer, in “Easy Rider” (1969). 

That pan was modeled by the 
screenwriter Terry Southern after 
William Faulkner's fictional lawyer 
Gavin Stevens and was originally 
meant to be played by Rip Tom. 

At the tune “Easy Rider” was 
being planned, Nicholson had al- 
ready been hying to make it in 
Hollywood for a decade. As 
McGilligan writes, “Ten years of 
scrounging for parts had left him 


bottomed out as an actor, and he 
had thrown himself into writing 
and producing.” 

He happened to be working on 
the first Monkees movie for the 
people who ended up producing 
“Easy Rider." When Rip Torn quit 
over salary problems, Nicholson 
was already working on the film as 
production troubleshooter, so he 
was available to step into the va- 
cant part. Life as a film star began. 

McGilligan, whose previous 
books include biographies of James 
Cagney, Robert Altman and 
George Cukor, shrewdly uses the 
history of Nicholson's serendipi- 
tous involvement with “Easy Rid- 
er” as his prologue. Then he tops it 
with the even more surprising stojy 
of Nicholson’s origins. 

It seems that be had an nnre- 
markable lower-middle-dass Cath- 
olic upbringing in Neptune, New- 
Jersey. His parents were John and 
Ethel May Nidiolson, a window 
dresser and a beautician. 

Except that they were not his par- 
ents, rot his grandparents. As he 
was not to learn untu 1974, when he 


was 37, his mother was June Frances 
Nicholson, the wom an he had al- 
ways thought was fats sister, ffis fa- 
ther was reputed to be Don Fuzrillo- 
Rose, a professional singer Ethel 
May banished from her daughter's 
life before her grandchild was bom. 

McGiQigan also mentions the 
possible paternity of Eddie King, 
an actor and dance partner of 
June's whom neighbors thought 
Nicholson grew up to resemble. 
The actor never met either of his 
putative fathers. 


AMSTERDAM 

BRASSBBE DE ROOOE LEHJW 


yon fed anticipation over the roles 
Nicholson wfli be pitying that have 
made him the most electrifying 
screen actor of the last two de- 
cades: Bobby Dupea in “Five Easy 
Pieces,” Bflty Buddnsky in “The 
Last Detafl.'O. J. Gittes in “China- 
town,” Randle P. McMurphy in 
“One Flew Over the Cnckoo’s 
Nest,” Torn Logan in “The Missou- 
ri Breaks,” Jack Torrance in “The 
Siming,” the Joker in “Batman" 
and James R. Hoffa in “Hoffa." 

As it turns out, the earlier years 
of Nicholson’s career are the most 
absorbing to read about 

BEST SELLERS 


TV New York Times 

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1 ACCIDENT, by Dauidfc 

Sled — | 

2 THE CELESTINE PROPHE- 
CY. by James RedQeld 3 

3 DISCLOSURE, by hfidud 

Crichton 2 

4 THE BRIDGES OF MADI- 

SON COUNTY, by Robert 
James WaDer 4 

5 SLOW WALTZ IN CEDAR 

BEND.bv Robert James Wal- 
ler — : 5 

6 LIKE WATER FOR CHOC- 
OLATE, by Laura Esquivel - 7 

7 THE CAT WHO CAME TO 

BREAKFAST, by Ufian Jack- 
son Braun 6 

8 ROGUE WARRIOR UJted 

Cdl, by Richard Marrinkjo 
and John Wetanan 9 

9 FAMILY BLESSINGS, by La 

Vyrie Spencer 8 

10 FATAL CURE, by Robin 

Cook 10 

11 RAMA REVEALED, by Ar- 
ihnrG Clarke sad Gcnuy Lee 13 

12 WITHOUT REMORSE, by 

Tom Qancy II 

13 MCNALLY'S CAPER, by 

Lawr enc e Sanders ... 12 

14 SECOND NATURE, by Alice 

Hoffman 14 

15 SAREK, by A. C. Crispin __ 15 

NONFICTION 

1 EMBRACED BY THE 
LIGHT, by Betty J.EadJe— I 


Apparently, he was always the 
Jack Nicholson he so often radiates 
in ins roles: the fractious but likable 
down with the manic smile. He 
seems to have picked 19 his slow 
drawl with its peculiar emphari* 
from a highnscbool friend. 

Yet although he was framed ear- 
ly, he worked extremdy hard at his- 
art, observing practicing, reading 
about and discussing technique. 

“For all of his improvisational 
mystique,” McGilHgan writes, “he 
is one of the more assiduously 
trained motion-picture stars in the 
history of Hollywood.” 

The author says that while Nich- 
olson didn’t deter hhn from writing 
the book, neither did he talk to the 
author, and Nicholson discouraged 
many his intimates from cooper- 
ating. 

In short, for all its considerable 
fascination, “Jack’s Life" is finally 
not very much more than upper- 
drawer fan-magazine gossip. 

Christopher Lekrrumn-Haupt is 
an the staff of The New York Tones. 


1 THE BOOK OF VIRTUES, 

tv William J. Barnett 2 13 

SflOWWEDffi.bySbenrtnB. 

Noland in 3 

4 ZLATA'S DIARY, by Zlata 

FUipcwic I 

5 SOUL MATES, by Thomas 

Moon: , 3 in 

6 MIDNIGHT IN THE GAR- 
DEN OF GOOD AND EVIL, 

by John Bcnadi 9 5 

7 HAVING OUR SAY. by Sa- 
nta and a. Elizabeth Ddany 

with Amy Hill Hearth 7 ia 

8 WANNA HOL- 
LER, by Nathan Me Call 1 

9 TAKE noth. 

D4G FOR MY JOURNEY 

4 24 

S ci nfri d n 28 

11 A DRINKING LIFE, by Pete 

Haari D 5 5 

12 THE HIDDEN UFE OF 
DOGS, by E lizabeth Marshall 6 30 

13 REENGINEERING THE 
CORPORATION, by Michael 

4 

w>W 3 

15 R UN WITH 

; 83 

, I0 

4 AGELESS BODY Ttmp' 3 22 
P" 4 35 


By Mike Zwerin 

J manatltmat Herald Thtone 

P ARIS — Pat Methen/s “Zero Toler- 
ance for Silence,” released tins wedc 
by Geffen, is a well titled album. My 
bones are rattling. I am shivering. The 

harror! , „ 

The first impression is of two flat-out 
stoned Turn Hendrix trades at the same time. 
But if s both deeper and worse than that. 
Neither rock nor jazz, not notes and maybe 
not even music, the sound exists in undynannc 
space, like a sculpture. The two c h a n nels are 
not quite in tune; like chalk on a blackboard, 
cracking knuckles, low flying jets, a gnmgy 
herd of moose, white sound — bone ratt lin g. 

Guitarist Metheny became one of jazz’s 
biggest draws by making agreeable early New 
Age classics like “As Falls Wichita, So Falls 
Wichita Falls,” while retaining his straight- 
ahead credentials with the album “80/81” 
(ECM), with Dewey Redman, and touring last 
summer with Dewey’s young-lion son Joshua. 

He explained his most recent title to the 
French Jazz Magazine: 

Today we are bombarded without stop by 
sounds — sounds of fax machines, of zapping 
between stations and channels, this has al- 
ways interested me. 1 think there's a lot of 
bidden information out there. Thai's what Fm 
getting at The sound under the ’sound.' " 

A statement of principle worthy of John 
Cage. Which does not change the fact that 
these sounds cannot be called beautiful (some 
of ns are old-fashioned). 

This is a soundtrack for a “Mad Max” 
sequel and it reflects the “Generation X” 
McJob End-of-tbe-Empire vision of die fu- 
ture. He made it on the spar of the moment in 
a few hours when a studio happened to be free. 
He says he’s been thinking of this album for 
years. 

For five nannies in Part Two, he reveals a 
smidgeon of silence tolerance with bluesy 
licks, bnt it's Ledbelly -around-th e-bend. 
Te rmina tor Bines. 

One “tune” is played by two mad country 
fiddlers with electric hair from a Robert 
Crumb cartoon. There’s a synthesized simplic- 
ity toil, bnt ironic, as though he’s listening to 
himself play “simply” and saying, “isn't sim- 
ple complicated?" Thro, Mad Max country 
again. Total Destroy. 

F OR most of the past year and a half, 
Metheny has been Irving in hotels, 
tins is an alienated man. Yet it has a 
certain twisted attraction. It does, 
unfortunately, reflect our times and these days 
well tolerate just about anything that's obvi- 
ously honest at just about any price: 

Yon wonder who will buy il Maybe it will 
become an unexpected smash but mat would 
be a profound surprise. Metheny is a fine and 
intelligent musician, he has always played 
honestly. 

There is no reason to fabricate music so 
thick, sinister and aggressively uncommercial 
unless that’s the way you really fed. Which 
makes it even more grim, and, strangely, 
strong. Maybe even important. 




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BUSINESS 



International Herald Tribune, Wednesday , March 30, 1994 


Page 9 j — _ 


-THE TRIB INDEX- 1 1 1 23fii 

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compiled 



Asia/P^cific 


Appro, weighihg: 32% 
04PJI: 127.47 Pfwj 12759 


Europe 


Approx, waiyting: 37% 
04PiL 1 1159 Prav_- 112.84 



Vn Index tracks US. dofar tabes ot stocks Ik Tokyo, Nms York, London, end 
AigMIm, AusMta, Austria, Belgium, Brad, Canada, CNto, Denmark, Rntand, 
Franco, Germany, Hong Kong. Rafy, liwdco, Hetw rta nd a , NawZaafendl, Hammy, 
StoffBpora, Spain, Smden, Sataariand and VMeaolo. For Tokyo, New York and 
London, thm Mm H mnprmit nt rht, fiiwrfiiwIe ^^pMwOii i, 

otherwise Me ton top stocks an tractor! 


1 Industrial Sectors J 


Tub. Prav. % 

• 4PJL dem Manga 


IN. 

• 4PJL 

Pnc. 

aka* 

% 

chav* 

Ehargr 

10828 10951 -1.12 

CapMGoodi 

111.46 

112J4 

-1.14 

Ufflfea 

12257 123.40 -059 

RmHaM* 

12052 

12254 

-159 

finance 

115.43 118.10 -058 

Consumer Good! 

9656 

9851 

-157 

Senrfcas 

11855 11854 -050 

IHkqIUJSOLS 

127.44 

128.12 

-053 

For monMormaSon about Pie Index, a booklet b avaSabh free of charge. 


Write to Titii Index, 181 Avenue Charles de GxjBb, 92521 NamyCedex, Renee. 


O Msfimtlofiol Hamid THbuno 


Economy 
Rolls On 
In U.S. 

Optimism Rated 
Ait 4-Year High 

The Associated Press 

NEW YORK — Consumer con- 
fidence in the U.S. economy 
jumped in March to the highest 
level in nearly four years, the Con- 
ference Board reported Tuesday. 

Separately, the government an- 
nounced that saks erf new homes 
edged up 15 percent in February, 
but noted dial this allowed it to 
only partly reverse the largest de- 
clme on record a month ear ter. The 

West posted die only gam. 

The Conference Board said that 
its latest reading of consumer faith 
in the economy was a strong sign 
that “we may wdl be on the way to 
a sustained and reasonably vigor- 
ous economic expansion." 

But the news raised fears of in- 
flation in the bond market, sending 
the 30-year yield above 7 percent 
and pulling stock prices lower. 

The index of consumer senti- 
ment rose from 79.9 in February to 
86.7 in March, the highest reading 
since July 1990. The Index, calcu- 
lated on a 1985 base of 100, is 
derived from a monthly survey of 
consumers nationwide that assesses 
their willingness to borrow and 
spend money, f^ngunw ■ywirting 
is critical to the economy's expan- 
sion, accounting for about two- 
thirds of economic growth. 

Fabian Linden, executive direc- 
tor of the Conference Board’s Con- 
sumer Research Center, noted that 
the current reading was 26 points 
higher than it was last October. 

“Certainly, c onsumer confidence 
is now at a level which, over the 
years, has foreshadowed an increas- 
ingly strong economy,” he said. 

At the same time, however, con- 
sumers expressed concern about 
jobs. A higher number of respon- 
dents said m March than in Febru- 
ary that jobs were “hard to geL” 
The consumer confidence mea- 
sured in the survey varied widely 
among geographical rones, with 
the Mountain, South Atlantic and 
West North Central regions of the 

See CONSUMERS, Page 10 


MEDIA MARKETS 



Wilton Carpets Asian Screens 

By Kevin Muiphy 

International Herald Tribune 

H ONG KONG — In less than a year, 

Asia's satellite television business has 
changed from a battle for pan- Asian 
supremacy to aoountry-by-axmtry en- 
durance coolest with dozens erf new players. 

Wilton Group PLC typifies the transformation. 

Wilton, a little-known. London-fisted company 
that was mice a distributor of consumer goods, is 
turning itself into one of the purest investment 
plays in the entertainment business across Asia. 

WiUon has become the hoiefing company for a 
coflection of deals and joint ventures hatched ly a 
young Malaysian entrepreneur, dive Ng, with a 
powerful collection of contacts in the market where 
two thirds of the world's potential viewers live. 

A proliferation of new satellite space, program- 
ming piracy and protectionism, all wrapped in talk 
of cultural sensitivity, has sent industry giants such 
as News Corp.’s STAR TV into a scramble for 
local partners in nearly every A s ian market 

t*. m* MMMnw nni find W 


The big international concerns will find compa- 
tcwilton already there, using connections 


mes like niiuHi ousomj “—1 —— o _ — — 

rather than large capital outlays to secure a strate- 
gic place in the fast-growing industry. 

“STAR TV’s success has accelerated the cable 
business in Asia,” said Mr. Ng, Wilton's deputy 
chairman and great-grandson erf Lim Cmeng I 16 *, 
a Penang-based palm ofi trader whose family, is 
now, in the words of a Kuala Lumpur securities 
analyst, “very rich and very private. 

“The only way governments can control what 
signals come into their country is b y grant ing 
^]e-operaimg licenses to people they approve, 
Mr. Ngsai^This has created a lot of new 

^S^^e^ged as a company to 

with in February-by establishing a satdiik tdew- 

sion channel for Chinese communities m Europe. 


The Chinese Channel joint venture with Shaw 
Medial 
by the fa 

nate Sr Run Run Shaw, 

250,000 households in Europe. 

The network wili broadcast 12 hours a day, show- 
ing programs made fry Hong Kang’s Television 
Broadcast Ltd, probably the largest producer of 
Oriim&4mguageentalflmmeat,aiidavalnaMei»rt- 

nfr tyftfr fo pan desig ns nn intcnuticori at pansinn. 

Wilton followed up Monday with rhe announce- 
ment of plans to open a movie complex in Singa- 
pore's Bugis Junction with anotherpartner in sev- 
en Asian markets, United Artists Theater Grant 
Inc., which controls the largest number of movie 
screens in the United States. 

“Tetevirion will be big in Asia, but people want 
to get out of their houses. Going to modem cinema 
has suddenly become the tiring to do,” Mr. Ng 
said. “All the Kg cinema companies want to break 
into Asia and with United Artists we're working 
with a market leader.” 

Through contacts made during time spent in 
Denver manag in g a family-run investment fund, 
Mr. Ngforged an affiance with United International 


ator with interests in Europe and increasingly, Asia. 

Wilton owns 20 parent of UIH Asia, which in 
tom owns 15 percent of one of Taiwan’s leading 
cable television networks, Po Hsm, controlled fry 
the ruling Nationalist Party, or Kuomintang. 

In Hong Kong, UIH Asia is working with die 
Wharf Came network and in Malaysia it is part of a 
consortium bidding far a country-wide cabre-tdevi- 
sion ficeose expected to be awarded next month. 

On its own, Wilton owns a small stake in Thai- 
land’s International Broadcasting Corp^ which 
owns a Bangkok cable network. It also has signed a 
deal to animate and market the comic book charao- 
texs owned fry Hong Kong’s Jade Dynasty group. 


Has Wall Street Topped? 

Weakness Makes Analysts Wonder 


By Brett D. Fromson 

Washington Post Service 

NEW YORK —The slide in 
UB. stocks lengthened Tuesday, 
with the Dow Jones industrial 
average plunging 63 points, amid 
w arning s from a growing num- 
ber of Wall Street analysts that a 
major correction, if not a long- 
term market decline, is under 
way. 

Those who have joined the 
pessimists' camp say the reasons 
abound for their dim view of the 
market. They cite rising interest 
rales, inflationary expectations, 
a slowdown of mutoaMund . 

ranging from the domestic 
Whitewater issue to the threat of 
trouble in Korea. 

Since hie January, what it ap- 
proached the 4,000 mark, the 
Dow has fallen more than 275 
points, or about 7 percent The 
index fell through 3,700 Tues- 
day, finishing down 6333 points 
at 3,699.02, according to an early 


that helps to keep speculative 
favor in check. 

But if this sfide masks the start 
of a long, sustained decline in 
stock pnccs — a full-fledged 
bear market — it would be bad 
for the economy, for federal reg- 
ulators and for President Bui 
Clinton, who has largely enjoyed 
the economic strength implied 
fry rising stock prices. 

A rising stock market can 
boost the economy fry making 
Americans fed p r osperous. “A 
major bear market would have a 
direct impact on household 
spending more than ever because 
households have more of their 
money in stocks «nd b on ds thaw 
ever,” said Henry Kaufman, a 
Wall Street economist noted for 
his pessimism. 

Richard McCabe, chief mar- 


ket analyst for Marin Lynch & 
Co, has told the firm's dusts to 
expect a market decline of 15 to 
25 per ce n t “A Heriltne in the 

Dow to 3300 could be a risk,” he 
said. 

Wall Street's turnaround 
comes at a time when the econo- 

xnally would make traders bull- 
ish. But many analysts said they 
believed stock prices stdl were 
high relative to profits and divi- 
dends paid to investors. Divi- 
dends would have to improve 
significantly to justify current 
stock prices, said Ned Dams, 
head of Ned Davis Research Inc. 

David D. Hale, chief econo- 
mist of Kemper Securities Inc, 

See STOCKS, Page 10 


tally. 

Otheri 



1 indexes also have fallen. 
The Nasdaq composite index of 
over-the-counter issues has fall- 
en more than 6 percent since it 
set a record on March 18; the 
index fell 1656 points on Tues- 
day, to 75534. 

Some analysts are hoping this 
is no more than a long-awaited 
correction, a short-term deefine 
in an otherwise rising market 


• 




; Jan. 1,1991 = 10C 





K 








i Avt/v^^V 







l 








mt 


urr 


State to Punish 
Former Chief of 
Credit Lyonnais 



Compiled by Oir Stiff from Dupatches 

MILAN — Investors sold Italian bonds and the 
currency Tuesday as initial enlhuaasm ova the elector- 
al lead by the rightist ahance cooled amid fears that the 
aTiianrff might have to struggle to form a government. 

Bickering among supposed allies of Silvio Berlus- 
coni, head of the alliance, soured the mood, and news 
that the alliance might not have west outright major- 
ities in both houses of the legislature added to the 
uncertainty. 

The lira and the government bond market, a barome- 
ter of the financial mood, both ended Iowa. The price 
of KJyear bonds for June defivoy fell 1.16 points, while 
the dollar rose to 1,641 lira from 1,636 on Monday. 

“The trouble is, no one is convinced the alliance can 


get its act together and form a solid government 
quickly,” one Milan trader yHH 
But the stock market did not sunender all the 
upward momentum it showed Monday, when it 
jumped nearly 4 percent cm speculation that the right 
was heading for a sweep erf both legislative houses. The 
MIB index on the Milan stock exchange ended at 
1,128, up from 1,104 Monday. 

Mr. Berlusconi, a billionaire media executive, was 
reported to have won an outright majority in the 630- 
seat'Chamber of Deputies, the lower but more power- 
ful hong* of the Italian legislature, and financial ana- 
lysts said this should be enough to guarantee that a 
government could eventually be formed. 

(Reuters, Bloomberg) 


By Jacques Neher 

fmemattonal Herald Tribune 

PARIS — Jean-Yves Haberer, 
the forma chairman of Credit Ly- 
onnais who has been Warned far the 
bank’s debacle, is to be fired from 
his current banking post, a Finance 
Ministry source said Tuesday. 

Tins person, who refused to be 
identified, spoke after Mr. Haberer 
called for a public investigation 
into the affairs of Crtdit Lyonnais, 
the state-controlled bank that he 
ran from 1988 until last November. 

The Finance Ministry source in- 
dicated that Mr. Haberer would be 
removed as chairman of Crtdit Na- 
tional, a much smaller state-owned 
institution, after motmting public 
reaction to the 65 bflfion franc fSL2 
bflEon) loss reported last week fry 
Crtdit Lyonnais. The bank, weighed 
down fry bad loans, will require a 
bailout that will cost French taxpay- 
ers more than 23 bilKon francs. 

“It took some time for us to 
evaluate the situation,” the govern- 
ment source said. 

Earlier Tuesday, Mr. Haberer 
lwh«l hack at his accusers in pot- 
ties and the media, charging for the 
first time that the Socialist govern- 
ment then in power had used the 
bank as a tool in its political and 
economic policy. 

The charge appeared likely to 
fuel new accusations as France in- 
creasingly asks where all the money 
went and why the government and 
banking authorities were unable, or 
unwilling, to control a spate of 
risky loans fry the state-owned in- 
stitution to the real estate and film 
industries ova the past six years. 

As a result of this aggressive lend- 
ing policy and record losses, 
France’s largest bank last week an- 
nounced a restructuring {dan requir- 
ing the state to put up 45 bufion 
francs in new caprtal and grant 18.4 
bflfion francs in on its 

doubtful property portfolio. 

Mr. Habera, who was appointed 
fry the Socialists to run Crtdit Ly- 
onnais, enraged from months of 
silence to denounce what be de- 
scribed as “a media lynching,” and 
called for a public investigation. 

He accused the Socialists of pres- 


suring him lo support key econom- 
ic sectors, even if (hey lost money, 
until they lost power to the right m 
the 1993 legislative elections. 

“People are not taking into ac- 
count tire recommendations which 
I received, at least until March 
1993, from the majority state share- 
holder to support important sectors 
of the economy and thus contribute 
to growth and employment, partic- 
ularly during the years of ecotmhnc 
crisis that our country has suf- 
fered,” he said. 

Unemployment, now at 123 per- 
cent in France, was largely respon- 
sible for the voters' rejection of the 
Socialists last spring. 

“I demand publicly that an in- 
quest examine all that happened 
and clarify the responsibilities,” 
Mr. Haberer said. “I accept mine. I 
want them explained and assigned, 
without hindsight, in a way that is 
ap propriate for public service.” 

Earlier tins week, Fran§ois d’Au- 
bert, a conservative legislator in the 
National Assembly, called for a' 
similar investigation. He said it 
should focus on the bank’s “myste- 
rious and powerful” subsidiary AI- 
tus Finance, on a unit called 
SDBO, and on Clinvest, responsi- 
ble for the bank's industrial invest- 
ments. 

Though Mr. Habera did not cite 
specifics, the bank in 1991 paid 23 
biffian francs for a 20 percent stake 
in Groupe Usinor-Sacilor, the trou- 
bled state-owned steelmaker, and in 
1992 it paid 1.4 billion francs for 20 
percent of Aerospatiale, the state- 
owned aerospace compaq^Losses 

the bank's loss last year. 

The conservative government of 
Edouard Balladur last November 
replaced Mr. Haberer with Jean 
Peyrelevade, but gave Mr. Haberer 
a consolation prize by sending him 
to Crtdit National 

Some mwtia commentators have 
suggested thai the government was 
wrong to keep Mr. Haberer at 
Crtdit National given the losses at 
Credit Lyonnais. 

“Between 1988 and 1993, Jean- 
Yves Habera bet 30 to 40 billion 

See LYONNAIS, Page 13 


Wharf TV 
Has Airtime 
For the BBC 


International Herald Tribune 

HONG KONG — The British 
Broadcasting Corp.’s World Ser- 
vice Television, dropped from the 
China broadcasts of Rupert Mur- 
doch’s STAR TV network, was in- 
vited back into that market on 
Tuesday by another television com- 
pany, Wharf Cable. 

The offer by Wharf Cable could 
provide the BBC with a new foot- 
hold in East Asia, a market with 
huge potential while offering a 
marketing challeng e to STAR TV, 
which wifi be without an interna- 
tional news service in half of its 
broadcast area beginning April 17. 

STAR TV, purchased by News 
Crap, in July last year for $523 
mfllinn, decided earner this month 
to replace the BBC broadcasts in 
the area dominated by China in a 
bid to expand its entertainment 
programming and excise a source 
erf irritation to Beijing. 

Wharf Cable’s managing director, 
Ng said Tuesday that he 
i offered the BBC four program- 
ming slots on rare of his network’s 
PngTish-langnag e channels, “one 
hour each at breakfast, lunch, sup- 
per and late at night.” Wharf Cable 
already offers a channel featuring 
Turner Broadcasting System Inc/s 
Cable News Netwrak International. 

The BBC had responded favor- 
ably, said Mr. Ng, who heads an 

See TV, Page 13 


CURRENCY & INTEREST RATES 


March 29 

Crow Rates u™ an V. ifi O Pmmtm 

% * HfS. - sr UB UttS* UH US" 

Amrnrnm um u* i-®» ?££ list — jus urn ism an- 
BnSta JU05 sues maos «« *** usm> um w uub uw 

r ” 1 ™ 1 i« i« txsx vm . njB — 

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2 "^,. MBS HW «** W**, SIM too 4MS «• 

Nnrvwfcte - u uni - “S S w M - w 

tu£i aus 031 1 SS .m- US — UB “ 

SS, IS » «l “2 iS. 

ua 

1 ECU 
ISDR 


Eurocurrency Deposits 

Swta 

DoBor D-Mtrfc Franc 
1 month 3 M Vk 5tt-59fc 4W-4W 
Smooths 3K-3& 5te«Ui MM 
• months 4Mh SWii. 3Mh 
1 near 4M«< 3WN 

Sources: Oman UorOs Bank. 

thdesaBrdiB& to I n terbank deyeelta of StrrmonirMmum (arequ/wrhntl. 





March 29 


French 


ECU 

Sterling 

Franc 

Yen 

5*w&Y* 

6 Kr 6 M> 

2 Wr 2 K 

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STlrSM. 

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^ noted: NJL: not 

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k To boron* pound; b. Town 

awttste, 

caraor P»l 

LAr.rand XMM 
S.KOT.MH KUO 

nwLinoa 7Jtn 
ToMmS SMB 
TMhdM SMS 
TorMshUn 21W1. 
iMBAtan 3471 

VMZ.M1V. 1UB0 


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(MMMb 


ammae. 

Other Dollar Values 

Oanmst Mr* VUS 

AnlraLS Ml* HflWW*". 


WrS 


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Amtr.xUL 11736 31 * 

anatom. nsom 

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CarahnrMB SM3 2W7 

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Egypt. PQtmd 3177 uff 

FALwndu *«w.r» 


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srr* s 

poMUhotr *2^ 

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Comn. paper w Ays 

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Lynch, Book of Tokyo, Comme rzbank. 
Greenwet! Monks* Croat Lvomus. 

Gold 

/M. PM. Ctfge 

368X5 38475 -3X5 

38770 30400 -245 

Now York 3U70 

04 dotton nor ounce Lordten irfWcW 

kmZurkhandNm 

Ino prices: New York Cemex (April). 
Source: Reuters- 


Zurich 


Our Banking relationships 
Are Based on a strong Tradition. 



T rust. It’s the basic 

tradition of banking. 

At Republic National 
Bank, it’s a living tradition, as 
vibrant today as it was 500 
years ago. 

We believe we must earn 
the trust of our clients every 
day. So we dedicate ourselves to 
protecting their funds through 
all economic climates. We 
respond to their needs with pru- 
dent, carefully-crafted products 
for today’s financial environ- 


ment. And we provide discreet, 
efficient service that is among 
the most respected in banking. 

Our emphasis on trust, 
strength and service has helped 
us become one of the world’s 
leading private banks. As a 
subsidiary of Safra Republic 
Holdings SjA. and an affiliate 
of Republic New York Corpora- 
tion, we’re part of a global net- 
work with over US$5.6 billion 
in capital and US$50 billion in 
assets. Those assets continue to 


grow at a healthy pace, a 
testament to the group’s strong 
balance sheets, risk-averse 
orientation and century-old 
heritage. 

While many banks today 
search for new directions, we 
believe there may be nothing 
more innovative than a solid 
focus on traditional banking. 
Because trust, strength and 
service are not just values of 
the past. They’re a pathway to 
the future. 


REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK 
OF NEWYORK (SUISSE) SA 


A SAFRA BANK 

Timeless Values, traditional Strength. 


HCAD OFFICE GENEVA 1204 • 2, PLACE DU UC ' TEL C022) 70S 85 SB • FOREX; (022) 705 55 SO AND GENEVA 1201 - 2. RUE DR. ALFRED- VINCENT (CORNER 
CUAJ DU NONTOLANC) WUNCHtt LU6AN0 5901 - t. VIA CANOW - TEL (091) 23 BS 92 * ZURICH 8039 • STOCKERSTRASSE 37 • TEL (01} 288 !8 18 - 
GUERNSEY ■ RUE DU PRE - ST. PETER PORT • TEL (481) 711 751 AFFILIATE REPUBLIC NATIONAL BANK OF NEW YORK IN NEW YORK OTHER LOCATIONS; 
GIBRALTAR - GUERNSEY - LONDON - LUXEMBOURG - MILAN - MONTE CARLO • PARIS - BEVERLY HILLS • CAYMAN ISLANDS • LOS ANGELES • MEXICO CITY - MIAMI - 
MONTREAL- NASSAU - NEW YORK- BUENOS AIRES - CARACAS ■ MONTEVIDEO- PUNTA DEL ESTfi - RIO DE JANEIRO ■ SANTIAGO - BEIRUT- BEUING ■ HONG KONG • 

JAKARTA • SINGAPORE ■ TAIPEI - TOKYO 


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Page 10 


** 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 


MARKET DIARY 


CONSUMERS; Confidence Up 


Confined from Page 9 
United States all registering over 

The lowest consumer-confidence 
figures came from New England, 
the Middle Atlantic states and the 
Pacific, with respective readings of 
66.6, 61 5 and 67.8. However, each 
of those figures marked an im- 
provement from the month before. 

The overall consumer-confi- 
dence figure is derived from two 

Foreign Exchange 

measures. Consumers' confidence 
about their present situation was 
recorded at 77 3 in March, up from' 
73.1 in February, while expecta- 
tions for the future registered 93 in 
March, up from 84.4 the month 
before. 

Regarding home sales, the De- 
partments of Commerce and Hous- 
ing and Urban Development said 
sales totaled 649,000 at a seasonafly 
adjusted annual rate, up from a 
revised 637,000 in January. 

Many analysts had expected 
February sales to rebound to 
715,000 from the initial January 
estimate of 695.000. 

Analysts bad attributed the 22Jj 
percent plunge in January to harsh 
weather and an unsustainable level 
of sales in December. It was die 
steepest since the series began in 
1963. 

Sales totaled a revised 822,000 in 
December, the largest number 
since 857,000 in April 1986. 

Despite falling from their recent 
peak, sales during the first two 


months of 1994 stOl were 6.4 per- 
cent above those of the same period 
a year earlier. Many analysts be- 
lieve the lost sales wfll be made up 
with the arrival of more favorable 
weather. 

But some analysts are concerned 
that rising mortgage rates could 
have a depressing effect on sales. 
Fixed-rate. 30-year mortgage rates 
reached 7.8 percent last week after 
averaging 7. 15 percent in February, 
np from 7.07 percent in January 
and a 25-year low of 6.74 percent in 
October. Many analysts believe 
they could hit 8 percent by the end 
of the year. 

■ Dollar Slides Against Yen 

The dollar fell to a four-week low 
against the yen on Tuesday after 
Washington expressed disappoint- 
ment with Japan's latest effort to 
its markets to U.S. goods, 


Bloomberg Business News report- 
ed from New York. 

The dollar, which had been un- 
der pressure in Asia and Europe, 
fell to a 103.125 yen dree in New 
York, down from 104.05 yen on 
Monday, after U.S. Trade Repre- 
sentative Mickey Kan tor said that 
Japan’s effort to open its markets 
“does not meet" U.S goals. 

But gains in U.S. consumer con- 
fidence helped the dollar against 
European currencies. It rose to 
1.6727 DM from 1.6722 DM. 

Against other currencies, the 
dollar rose to 1.4225 Swiss francs 
from 1.4215 and to 5.7230 French 
franc from 5.7120. The pound 
slipped to 51.4850 from $1.4961. 


via Aaockned Pits* 


MOn*l J* 



The Dow 




•VSTF - .", 

... . 

< 5 „? 

• Y\\ 



.... .. 


STOCKS.* Is Market Past Prime? 


Continued from Page 9 
said be was concerned that the flow 
of fresh money into mutual funds, 
which have helped power the mar- 
ket’s rise in the past few years, has 
slowed. 

Another cause of worry to some 
traders is that some big investors 
have been taking profits on days 
when stock prices advance and are 
buying less aggressively when 
prices fall 

“There is no conviction, and that 
is normally associated with bear 
markets," said John Burnett, a 
trader at Donaldson, Lufitin & Jen- 
rette Securities Corp. “Uncertainty 
leads to selling." 

■ Rales Burden Market 

Rising interest rates helped bur- 
den the stock market Tuesday, with 
the price of the benchmark 30-year 
government bond dropping 30/32 
to 90 1 /32 and the yield hitting 7.06 



year, news agencies 
reported from New York. 

Bonds were hit by a jump in the 
Conference Board's consumer con- 
fidence index for March. The index 
reached the highest level in about 
four years, exacerbating fears that 
inflation is bound to accompany 
economic growth. Rising inflation is 
likely to pressure tbe Federal Re- 


serve Board to raise U.S. interest 
rates. 

With bond yields above 7 percent, 
portfolio managers ore beginning to 
consider the allure of fixed-income 
investments, some analysts said. 

Losers outpaced gamers by a 10- 
(o-l ratio on the New York Stock 
Exchange on heavy volume of 
about 300 milli on shares. 

Telefonos de Mexico’s American 
depositary receipts were the most 
actively traded issue. The shares 
fell I to 59%, selling off with the 
broader market despite reaching a 
tentative agreement with labor 
leaders on Monday. 

Steel-making companies were 
active, with Geneva Steel losing 2 
to 15 after it said it expected its loss 
to widen in the second quarter be- 
cause of ineffecient production and 
higher costs. 

Tele communications Inc. 
slipped % to 2 lid, still underpres- 
sure from its announcement last 
week that it was considering re- 
structuring and splitting into four 
publicly traded companies. 

America Online dropped 4% to 77 
after a report that Pan] Allen, a co- 
founder of Microsoft was consider- 
ing selling his 18 percent stake in the 
electronic information service Mi- 
crosoft also fell losing 3% to 82 

(Reuters 

Knight-Ridder, Bloomberg) 


IHT 

NYSE Host Actives 


VOX High 

UM 

LM 

ChB. 


78956 62U 

S9fe 

59 V, 

^'0 



92 'A 





1BH 





22 




31211 54fe 

53fe 

52 Vk 



28619 29 

26fe 

26 Vj 

_-2fe 


26186 31fe 

31W 




24086 324k 

309+ 

31% 




50 





30 

30% 




29 U, 

29V, 


AMD 


29 Vi 

29% 



■ 1 [ 1 ■ 


56 V. 





39’4 


EKOdUk 

18798 45 

44fe 

444, 


NASDAQ Most Actives 


VrtL Mflh 

Law 

Lost 

CM. 


39132 1W, 

1BU 

187 + 



36156 22>-a 

21V, 

2194 



35546 23'/* 

23 Vi 


• '*■ 


32805 33V. 

31V. 

32 



30941 156. 

13*1 


— 


30593 69U 

66 

66'/. 



30490 l*r 

r 

IVu 



30225 73V, 

69 V, 




29365 19V5 

IBfe 




34081 S6V, 

B2'.> 

82 '.i 

—3*6 



8 




22009 3224 

30V, 

311+ 

— •* 


21726 59 Va 

SS'.T 

56V, 

—aw 


20021 58'T 

Wh 

54fe 


ApcileC 

19012 33 

32 Vi 

32 V. 

— ’j 

AHEX Most Actives 


Vol Utah 

Low 

Last 

ChB. 


9487 27W 

2S’.t 

IV* 

-1W 



6V*: 


— W 

AEXM 

7514 l*'j 

Ife 



ENSCO 

7117 3fe 

3'A 

3 Vj 



6477 4‘V h 

4-.',, 

4"^ 

— w 


4252 13+6 

127a 

ir* 

— fe 


4136 28to 

27Vb 

2744 


ExpLA 

4002 lV.i 

III 

1V„ 

to. 

CttFst 

3645 81k 

8+i 

8V, 

- w 

ForstLb 

3514 44 

4244 

42'm 

— 1*.4 

Market Sales 


Today 

«PJ*L 

NYSE 301.14 

Amex 17X6 

Nasdaq 2V1.M 

In millions. 


347-25 

22.72 

30.72 


Dew Jones Averages 

Ope* 

High Uw 

Last 

an. 

Indus 3757.17 3762.93 369706 3699 JW —6303 
Trans 1707.16 1711.11 167X81 167691— 3X90 
um 20679 205.25 20133 20153 —621 

0tn9> 1347.17 1349J9 132622 132450-2X20 

Standard A Poor’s Indexes 

industrials 

Transa. 

UlUlHes 

Finance 

5F500 

SP 100 

PrtVbM 
High Law 

54005 53X32 

41801 41X82 

MTJ4 15906 
4304 4X00 

461.12 45610 
42651 42X19 

Claw 

53702 

41681 

16IJZ 

43J2 

46000 

42691 

Today 

4 PM. 
53X57 
40701 
16B3I 
4X99 
4SX48 
41901 

NYSE Indexes 


High Law 

Last 

Cbg. 

ComPosOe 

htoustruls 

Tronsb. 

unity 

Finance 

255J3 25108 
315J3 30939 
26206 25692 
214.91 211 JO 
21673 207.61 

251 JO 
30901 
25699 
21109 
20706 

—620 

—500 

—505 

—309 

—305 

NASDAQ Indexes 


High Law 

Last 

Cho- I 

CompusitB 

Indurtrirt^ 

Banks 

Insurance 

Finance 

Tramp. 

Teteoam 

77X67 75831 
811.05 79903 
68803 68613 
90408 89699 
B9628 89a S3 
78407 76905 
I66M 16X47 

758.71— 13J9 
79183—1706 
60673 —332 
89607 —705 
89107 — 60S 
76905—1335 
16307 — X93 

AMEX Stock Index 


High Low 

LM 

Chg. 


46X21 4561B 

45403 

— 730 


EUROPEAN FUTURES 


Metals 


Pi'tVlWB 
Bid A3 


CIW . , 

•Id Ask 
ALUMINUM (HlVft GredO) 

H^TSBPU* W 

FHMTd 133350 133450 1337X0 1339X0 

COPPER CATHODES [HU* Grade) 

Dallare per mMiVc Mn 

5P01 192500 19»J 

forward 193600 IWS 
LEAD 


1749 JR) 195X50 
19SSJJ0 1957.00 


Dollars per iwrtYtc tan 


45800 457-00 
47X50 474JJQ 


566000 

575000 


spot ffljo 45UD 

Forward 47Z0O 473JD0 

NICKEL 

Dollars per metric tea 
Spat 561 003 5*20-00 

Forward 560000 568500 S74 
TIN 

Sw 0 ” P8r "SET****, 546500 547100 
Forward SUDD 551000 552000 553000 
ZINC ( S p ecta J HWI Grade) 
DonarereraNmdttd^ go* 

Reward 77500 77400 97? JO) 78000 


Financial 


9454 

9656 

— 006 

9400 

94J1 

— 009 

9X94 

9X96 

— 0.14 

9303 

9307 

— 030 

9X95 

9X98 

— 031 

9204 

9X46 

— 030 

9X00 

9109 

— 038 

9133 

9131 

—035 

9105 

9105 

— 034 

9133 

9130 

— 035 

9105 

9101 

— 037 

9030 

9003 

— 037 


Dow Jones Bond Averages 


20 Bonds 
lOUNllttes 
10 Industrials 


Previous Today 
Close Noon 

101.96 10155 

99.53 79-55 

10300 10X56 


NYSE Diary 


Close Frew. 


Advanced 

279 

65? 

Declined 

2034 

1567 

Unchanged 

471 

576 

Total issues 

2784 

2795 

NewHiahs 

5 

19 

New Lows 

>98 

174 


AMEX Diary 


Advanced 
Decfined 
Unchanged 
Total issues 
New Highs 
New Lows 


137 200 

522 447 

192 1B9 

053 V* 

6 13 

36 27 


Previous NASDAQ Diary 



Close 

Prey. 

Advanced 

953 

1610 

Declined 

2228 

1458 

unchanged 

1667 

1776 

Total Issues 

4848 

4844 

New Highs 

40 

73 

New Lows 

104 

S3 


Hist) Low Close Chouse 
9AMMTTH STERLING (LI FFE> 
knaimw - pts or no pet 
Job 7406 

Sap 94 47 

Dec 74.17 

Mar 9X23 

■fun 9X26 

Sep 9201 

Dec 9144 

Mar 92.12 

JOB TUB 

Sep 9109 

Dec 7105 

Est. volume: "105047. Oran hit.: 45X366. 
+MONTH EURODOLLARS (LIFFtt) 
si million - pf» Of ISO pet 

9504 —001 

9&20 —002 

94J2 — am 

9407 —003 

m. ra mat. 

93.91 

EsL volume: 494 Open bit.: 9J67. 
3-MONTH EUROMARKS (LIFFE) 

OM1 nUBhMi - pts of IN pet 
Jon 9459 9451 

Sep 7401 9473 

Dec 7493 7404 

Mar 9S04 7471 

Jim 9490 74JQ 

Sep 7477 9462 

Dec 7451 9442 

Mar 7443 9425 

Jim 9417 94.Q6 

Sop 7403 9303 

Dec raw 73-BO 

Mar 91*8 9300 


Oct 
Not 
D ec 
Jan 
Fed I 

Mar 


HKrt, low Last seme are a 

14£L50 (37 jO I3WS 73PJS — 7JS 

14X50 14250 14275 14275 ■— iJS 

14X00 IMS 14475 14475 -100 

MU 14600 H6SB 7465D .173 

K80O l3IS 14450 J«M -T0O 

pct! N.T. n.t. jas — 

« N.T. N.T. N.T. M7JB —105 

Est. volume: 1X953 . Open Ud. 110771 

BRENT CRUPR OIL I 1PE ) ... 

US. denars per harreHoh of UNO Barrels 
Mar 13.13 1209 1110 I3J0 +UB 

Jan 1117 U05 0.17 

Jill 1X29 1X16 H27 

Aug 1X42 1X30 1X39 

7X54 1X44 1X54 

o a 1X66 1X57 1306 

Mn 1377 1374 1374 

DOC 1X92 1190 1390 

JW N.T. N.T. N.T. 


1117 +0.16 
1X27 +0.19 
1X29 +0.14 
1151 +412 
066 +0.11 
13L76 +DL19 
1192 + 024 
1403 + 021 


Est. volume: 42079 . Open M. 146005 


Stock Indexes 

HWt LOW Close CtMOSS 
FTSE TOOtUFFE) 
as per mdax point 

Jim 31560 31040 31180 — 140 

IS 31440 3T3&0 31250 —140 

Die MX N.T. 3T*S0 — V40 

Est. volume: 14098. Open bit: 59039. 
CAC48 (MATIF) __ 

E5^° ,,er, 2lS0O 211600 211900 -4260B 
Apr 216450 Z127JJ0 212900 -+26-OT 

Mar 216150 213X50 213200 -+26AS 

Jan 2J49JD 271750 27JM® -4-2659 

SeP 215650 214900 213150 -+2600 

Dec 219700 216600 216500 -+2600 

Est volume: 48398. Open kit.: 79,311. 

Sources.- Main, Associated Press, 
London Infl Financial Futures Exchange, 
mn Petroleum Exchange. 


Dividends 


JIM 

9546 

9545 

Sep 

«23 

9522 

Dec 

9433 

9434 

Mar 

M.T. 

N.T. 

Jim 

N.T. 

N.T. 

Sep 

N.T. 

N.T. 


UkIl 


Campany 


Per Amt pay Roc 
IRREGULAR 


9401 —006 

9474 —005 

74BS —005 
7493 —007 

7402 — OB« 

WA2 —004 
9443 —004 

7426 —004 

740& —007 

9X93 —009 

7300 —005 

7305 —003 

Est. volume: 68010. Open bit.: 731001. 
3-MONTH FRENCH FRANC CMATlF) 

FF5 mlHfon "Pis el ioo pet 


HI 

4-4 


Jen 

9406 

9X98 

5099 

—003 

Seo 

9431 

9421 

9433 

—001 

Dec 

9649 

94.40 

9401 

— OC2 

Mar 

9407 

9402 

9453 

— 001 

Jun 

9409 

9407 

91404 

Uncfc. 

5cp 

9635 

9656 

9628 

— 003 

Dec 

7431 

960* 

M09 

— 007 

Mar 

9400 

9X93 

9396 

—004 


Est. volume: 37537. Ooen bit.: 254005. 
LONG GILT (LIFFE) 

63X006 - pfi A 33aOS Of IDS PCt 
Mar 107-22 106-21 1 06-25 -0-19 

Jan 107-04 105-06 105-22 - 0-21 

Sep N.T. N.T. 10+26 —0-21 

Est. volume: 97,107. Ooen InU 181751. 
GERMAN GOVERNMENT BUND (LIFFE) 
DM 250000 - Pts of IDO PCt 
Jon 9672 95.90 9609 —007 

Sep 96.15 9500 7S01 —007 

EsL volume: 121587. Open bit.: 30090. 
10-YEAR FRENCH GOV. BONDS (MAT IF} 
FF 500000 -Pts of 180 PCt 
Jon 13302 12203 12274 —030 

SOP 12206 12104 12204 — OM 

DK 12216 121)6 12174 -030 

Ext. volume: 190750. Open int: 150J41 


AARP BalSlk Bd 
AARPCrwS Inca 
FAI Insur Ltd 
Citicorp adipf 4 
Price T Rowe Bd 
, Price Rowe CA 
l Price Rowe DrwGrw 
i Price Rone Ea ind 
; Price 6a Inca 
Price FL Fin 
I Price GA 
Price Gr Inca 

• Price HT 
. Price MD 

Price NJ 
Price WY 
| Price TXInsur 
Price TasFr injur 

• Pricr us Tr tm 
! Price US TrLT 
I Price VA 
: Sun Ccmmunllies 
: United Newspaper 
; Western Mbilng 
. nocorox amount per ADR. 

REDUCED 

venae Sancers Ex-cft a 

; CORRECTION 

: UJB Find 71 +8 5-2 

Correcting name ot comaanv tram Martti 28. 


. 02 3-B 3-31 

_ 015 3-28 3-31 

a 0X57 +6 5-2 

- 2052 6-15 6-30 

. 09 3-78 4-1 

_ 02 3-2S 3-31 

_ M3 -28 

- .12 >28 4-4 

. 23 3-28 4-4 

_ 02 3-28 3-31 

_ 05 3-2B 4-4 

_ .17 3-28 4-4 

- 04 3-28 3-31 

. JC 3-28 3-31 

. 01 3-28 >31 

. 03 3-28 3-31 

_ 04 3-28 3-31 

_ 04 3-28 3-11 

. 02 3-28 331 

. 01 3-2S Ml 

01 3-28 Ml 
4-7 +21 
+8 7-T1 
+7 59 


U.S. /AT THE CLOSE- 


_ MS 
a 054 
a .1148 


JO 44 4-IJ 


INITIAL 


Mistn Tech n 


REGULAR 


Industrials 

Hieh Low Lost Settle Ch*e 
GASOIL tIPE) 

U-S. daUors per metric ton-lots of 100 tore 
APT 13675 13550 13575 13X50 —150 

May 13X5D 13175 13400 13475 —175 

Jon I355C 13400 13400 13400 — 10B 

Jol 1360D 13X25 13575 13575 —175 

ADO 13875 13775 13775 13700 —1.75 


! Ameren Inc 
Aaunrlor Co 
• ALtodesk Inc 
; Centrcl Hadsan 
i Depositors FdBas: 
Eolcnvcn Diverxjr 
I EatmVanca Exch 
I E atm: Van E canty 
. EotanVon Ex Boston 
Eaton Van FldEx 
EctaiVanMimlBd 
. EohaiVcm 2nd Fid 
' Eaton Vest 5tk Fd 
! Hertford Steam 
. HornwIGeo A 
< Howell Indus! 

] Hunt} Transport 
■ Lilly Ind 
I MOOTCD mu 
Ralston Purina 
1 TronsAttoUIc Hid 
i UJB Rn ad|p< B 
; US Surgical 
I Unlv Ntl Bk&Tr 


05 

5-2 

5-23 

J2 

*28 

5-17 

005 

44 

4-29 

.12 

4-8 

+22 

515 

+11 

5-2 

23 

3-29 

4-4 

JC 

3-28 

337 

JO 

3-28 

3-31 

.11 

3-25 

3-31 

30 

3-28 

3-31 

00 

3-28 

Ml 

057 

44 

+15 

00 

8-28 

3-31 

06 

4-6 

+29 

53 

44 

+28 

.125 

4-73 

5-15 

35 

5-5 

5-20 

05 

5-3 

5-19 

.10 

6-10 

7-1 

055 

4-7 

+21 

30 

5-16 

+10 

09 

6-7 

+21 

35 

+8 

+1 

02 

6-7 

+15 

35 

+13 

+27 


KI M Offering Takes in $632 Million 


Compiled bp Ow Staff From Dispatches 

AMSTERDAM — KLM Royal 
Dutch Airiines announced Tues- 
day that its share offering this 
month had netted 1.19 billion guil- 
ders (S632 million) in new capital. 

Investors in Ireland. Scotland 
and England purchased a large ma- 
jority of the 21 275 million com- 
mon shares issued at 44 guilders 
each. 

Tbe two-week offering raised 
nearly 200 million guilders more 
than expected, the company said. 


The company initially planned 
to issue 18.5 million shares, but 
demand prompted syndicates lead- 
ing tbe offering to exercise an op- 
tion to place an extra 15 percent 
At the Dutch investment bank 
Kempen & Co., an airline analyst, 
Cees Haasnoot said the offering 
had been “reasonably successful" 
but suggested K.JLM could have re- 
ceived more for its shares. 

KIM’S dose cooperation with 
Northwest Airlines, the fourtb-larg- 
est U-S. carrier, wfll continue to play 


an important role in its strategy. 

In its prospectus for the public 
offering, KIM said it would proba- 
bly omit its dividend for the year 
ending Thursday. The offering 
makes it unlikely KLM will pav a 
dividend soon. 

Tbe company said the Dutch 
government, which owns 382 per- 
cent of the airline, had main tamed 
its current stake by .purchasing 
970,455 comma) shares and pref- 
erential shares valued at 235 mil- 
lion guilders. ( Bloomberg AP) 


To Our Readers 

Because of the seven-hour 
time difference between New 
York and Paris until April 3, 
the New York Stock Exchange 
table, ihe U-S. Futures prices 
and some other items in this 
edition contain information 
from 3 PM. New York time. 

We regret the inconve- 
nience. which is necessary to 
meet distribution require- 
ments. All editions wfll again 
carry dosing prices and index- 
es after April 3. when Daylight 
Saving Time begins in the 
United States. 


TCL Viacom Negotiating Cable Deal 

NEW YORK (Bloomberg) -- Tele-Communications Inc. is 

ina toDincbase Viacom Inc!’s cable television sptans for about 522 
blkjnJ 5 nandal advisers on both sides of the tafts ! said 
Viacom, based in Dedham, Massachusetts, would use the proceeds of- 
tte SX *Stacurmi from its JIO Wbon acquiamm of 

Paramount Communications Inc. 

TCI, based in Englewood, Col 

ach significantly by folding VlaCwu. » ... — 

i sprawling 102 -nuUion subscriber base. . . . 

•Terser Broadcasting System is considering acquisitions “ 

~ ‘ 5 Network Inc. and Stiver King Comnnmicauons. people with 
ie of the talVs said. . . . • 

John CMalone, chid executive of TdeCommmignonsInc. * chair- 
man of " ----- ■ "" 

Home! 

12 independent 

McDermott Has Russian Agreement 

MOSCOW (Bloomberg) — McDermott International Inc. on Tuesday 
Signed joint venture agreements with a Russian company to do marine 
construction and shipb uilding in Russia’s Far East. , • 

The agreements with Amur Slipbuilding of Komsomolsk were signed by 
Robert Howson, McDermott’s chairman and dsid cxecaith-e. ThewenturK 
plan uj build bulk carriers and tankers for sale worldwide, and to bund and 
mstall offshore structures in the waters off Russia’s Far East coast 
Separately, a consortium of McDermott and four partners last week 
readied agreement with Russian authorities to develop oil and gas 
resources off Russia’s Sakhalin Island. The partners are Marathon Oil 
Co., Royal Dutch/ Shell Group, Mitsui Sc. Co. and Mitsubishi Corp. 

RJ. Reynolds Invests in Czech Plant 

NEW YORK (AFX) — RJ. Reynolds Tobacco Co. said Tuesday that 
it would invest in a cigarette plant in the Czech Republic. 

The company, a unit RJR Nabisco Holdings Corp., said it would begin 
convulsion of an existing plant in Benesov, near Prague. The refurbished 
plant will have a capacity of about 2 J5 billion cigarettes annually. 

J.L Case to Sell European Plants 

NEW YORK (Knight-Ridder) — J1 Case, the farm equipment 
divirion of Tenneco Inc, said Tuesday that it would either sell or close its 
foundries in St Dizier, France and Doncaster, Britain, as part of its. 
restructuring. 

Case said it would outsource loader backhoe transmissions that are 
produced at Sl Diner, enabling the plant to focus on agricultural 
transmissions. The company will also transfer loader backhoe assembly 
from Vierzon, France, to Crtpy en Valois, France. 

The limited Shuffles Executives 

COLUMBUS, Ohio (Bloomberg) — Limi ted Inc. on Tuesday named 
Michael Weiss acting president of its Limited Stores division, replacing 
Howard Gross, a 21-year company veteran. 

Mr. Weiss, who has been president of the company’s Express division, 
is credited with making it the most successful division of the Columbus* 
Ohio-based women’s apparel retailer. 

Mr. Gross, 50, will become president of Today’s Man Inc., an apparel, 
retailer based in Moores town, New Jersey. 

For the Record 

S^t International ln&, will form a venture with RFG Telecom Ltd. of 
India to provide electronic mail and software development. (Bloomberg) 
General Magic Inc, a 3-year-old company making software for hand- 
held computers, plans to raise up to $45 millio n through an initial public 
offering by mid-May, the San Frandsco Chronicle repented. ( Bloomberg ) 


Bertelsmann Gives Up on Vox 


Bloon&aj’ Businas News 

GUTERSLOH, Germany — 
Bertelsmann AG, the media con- 
glomerate, said Tuesday that Vox, 
a troubled German private televi- 
sion channel, would go into liqui- 
dation on April 1. 

“Our intense efforts to save the 
channel have not led to an accept- 
able result,” said Manfred Lahn- 
stein, a member of Bertelsmann’s 
board. ‘ 

Bertelsmann, which holds 24.9 
percent of Vox, was the last of 


WORLD STOCK MARKETS 


Agones francs Pnma March 29 


Amsterdam 


ABN Amro Hid 

ACF Holding 

Aooon 

Ahold 

AtoaNoftof 

AM6V 

Bab-Waasoran 

CSM 

DSM 

Elsevier 

FaUcer 

Gist-Bracadu 

HBG 

Helnekon 

HoOBpyg n s 

Hunter Douglas 

iHCCaland 

Inter Mueller 

Inti Nederland 

KLM 

KNP BT 

NMiiavd 

OcaGrfntan 


65 6500 
47M 4X40 
94 94 

4870 5070 
2I60O21L5O 
7X90 7600 
3900 3890 
6600 6700 
128 13080 
171 16800 
16 16.10 
52 51-50 

312 315 

226 22150 

57.10 57.10 
7700 7870 
4200 42.10 

83 83 

81.10 8200 
« 46.10 

46 4730 
6460 66 



4790 
200.90 202.10 
5070 50j 4B 
169 17350 
waitors/Kfimvr 111-50 1 1370 


Brussels 

AG Fin 2680 2685 

Arbtd «B0 -*450 

Barca 2235 22»3 

BMcaert 24300 24300 

COckerSIl 187 186 

Gubraa 6i« 6ira 

Domain 1388 1386 

Etoctrobei 6iro 6180 

gib I58B rm 

GBL 4440 4395 

Gevoert 900 9630 

Krodtatbanfc 72» 7290 

PWroflna 10325 10375 

Ptrwrrfln 31M 3200 

Royal Bctoe 55j» 5580 

SocGen Banauc 8560 S510 

5oc Gen Beta taue 2700 2700 


Safina 
Sohray 
TrodahH 
UCB 
Union Mlnlera 


15100 1495D 
14750 14825 
10150 10200 
23375 23450 
■ 2615 2590 


a^ s *S£ 8“ :,ss ” 2 


Frankfurt 


Alllan* Hold 2S75 2S2S 

Altana 61900 618 

Asfca 1 090 1040 

BASF 32X50326.10 

Barer 3840038670 

y. Hypo bank 4MSB 459 
y VecekBtofc 4965049200 
SBC 701 700 

SHF Bank 43630 429 



Fe&Jnwahlt. 

F Knmp Haeach 
Horponor 
Hankel 
Hoehttaf 

■ »— — -J— A 

nOBuDT 

Notanonn 
Horton 
IWKA 

Ktdl Son 
KnnJotfl 
KautlMl 510 507 

KHD 1420014470 

KkMCknerWertie 141 145 

LMe 


883 875 
437^”^ 


MataltL 

Muencn Rueck 

Porsche 

Preussaw 

PWA 

OWE 

WwlnmeWl 
ins 


'i- 




Oom Prev. 


Helsinki 

Amer-Yhtyma 
Enso-Gutzclt 
Huhtamakl 
K_O.P. 

Kvnunane 
Metro 
Nokia 
Pah Sola 
Reaola 
Stockmann 


128 130 
3800 38.10 
200 200 
1170 1100 
116 115 

2m 202 
406 4TO 
90 8800 
94 92 

300 3DZ 


Hong Kong 

Bk East Asia 34 3X25 
Camay Pacific 1170 11 

Cheung Karo 4FJD 4X25 
China Uoht Pwr 41 4000 
“ ilry Farm InTI 1100 1100 
Lung Dev 1X10 1400 
Seng Bank 54 52 

vscnLand M25 45 

HKAIrEns. 4X50 44 

HK China Gas 1900 1870 
HK Electric 22.10 227,: 

B K Land 2200 2100 

K Ready Trial 2230 22.40 
H3BC Ha Id bios 90 87 

HK Sham Htls 12 1100 
HKTHecwnm 1X50 13 

HK Firry 11.10 11 

Hutch Whampoa 3300 33 

Hyswi Dev 2500 25.18 
JardlneMoih. 5330 5150 
JanflneStr Hid 2600 2670 
Kowloon Motor 1500 1520 
Mandarin Orient 1000 1030 
Miramar Hofd 2370 2X33 
New wand Dev 2970 2830 
SHK Proas 56 54 

Shrtux 4X5 405 

Swire Pac a 5550 54 

TalOiaung Pros 1160 1150 
TVE 300 350 

WharfHUd _ 3275 3175 

Wlro On CO Inti 12.10 
WHnorind. 1160 l 


19701 


MSA 74 


Johannesburg 

AECI 9050 

Altech 
Anolo Amer 
Barlows 
Blyvaor 
Buffete 
De Beers 
Drlefanteln 
Gencor 
GFSA 
Harmony 
Htohyeld Steel 
Kloof 
Nedlxi 


SA Brews 
St Helena 
5asol 
Wetkom 
Western Deep 


« a 

205 211 

2975 2950 
8 NA 
4875 497S 
103104-25 
57 St 
9-40 950 
108 103 

27 27 

24 24 

4700 4850 
Z&SB 2? 
4X59 49 

85 86 
82 81 
47 

2275 22 

47 NJL 

TM 203 


RSBMBr*”* 


London 

Afibey Natl 409 

Allied Lyons 55S 

WM« 



BP 

Bril Airways 
Bril Gas 
Brfl Steel 
Brtl Telecom 
BTR 

Cable Wire 
CodburY Sell 
Carodon 
Goafs Vlyella 
Comm Union 
Courtaulds 
ECC Group 
Enterprise CHI 
Ewrphmnrt 
Fisans 
Forte 
GEC 

Genl Acc 

Glaxo 

Grand Met 

GRE 

Guinness 

GUS 

Hanson 

Hinsdawn 

HSBC Hidgs 

ICI 


’.19 

5.19 

447 

156 

4.13 

306 
701 

402 

307 

403 
472 
101 
274 

577 

STB 

403 

403 

025 

1-33 

204 

2.90 

tw 

413 

408 

105 

475 

57V 

209 

170 

706 

8.13 


1-92 

Ul 

571 

452 

126 

329 

12i 

573 

447 

306 

4.17 

306 
1J9 
197 

St 

474 

307 
236 
500 
523 
478 
406 
140 
102 
255 
190 
675 

422 

408 

104 

SB 

I 

803 


■ndicane 

Ktaofbhcr 

Lodbroke 

Land Sec 

Laporle 

Lasma 

Legal Gen Grp 
Uords Bank 
Marks Sp 
ME PC 
Non Power 
Notwest 
NthWst Water 
Pearson 
PB.O 
Pllkineton 
Power G en 
Prudential 
Rank Ora 
ReckltlCoi 
Redlond 
Reed inn 
Reuters 
RMC Group 
Rons Rayce 
RoKmn ( until 
Royal Soot 
RTZ 

Satnsbury 
ScotNOwcas 
Scot Power 
Sears 

Severn Trent 

Snell 

Siebe 

Smith Nephew 
Smith Kline B 
Smith (WH) 
Sun Alliance 
Tate B Lyle 
Tosco 
Thorn EMI 
Tomkins 
T5B Group 
Unilever 
UM Biscuits 
Vodafone 
War Loan 3W 
Weffcome 
Whitbread 
wnnamsHdos 
Willis Corroon 
F.T.I0I 


date Prev 

5.15 

5.12 

ya 

5lM 

1.96 

1.9B 

600 

604 

748 

IM 

124 

679 


569 

5011 

616 

617 

658 

6311 

658 

657 

668 

662 

SJV 

M7 

671 

663 

703 

ISO 

1J9 

101 

536 

537 

113 

112 

308 

307 

613 

606 

53/ 

533 

808 

835 

an.« 

2030 

900 

90S 

136 

1.79 

194 

197 

614 

6H 

642 

SM 

300 

173 

534 

623 

606 

6H7 

1.19 

1.16 

SM 

572 

657 

6B 

503 

585 

139 

139 

380 

181 

536 

5.23 

332 

215 

401 

689 

X14 

X14 

lOB 

10JO 

207 

205 

230 

117 

1031 

10.20 

336 

3137 

533 

630 

4303 

4672 

5J7 

508 

523 

STS 

303 

3.92 

X24 

226 

7618 



:: 3123-48 


Madrid 

BOV 3185 3210 

Bco Central HbR. 2925 2720 
Baxs.sonlonder avo 6770 

740 750 

2825 I860 
Mg ^ 

7220 7350 
155 155 

989 1000 
4365 4500 
3898 3890 
7765 1785 



Milan 

Banco Comm 


5690 5786 

il 84.75 84 

BTDIIP 264WZ7175 
2321 2390 
2421 2505 
2555 2514 

’US '£2 

320 023 

5200 5350 
2160 2100 
39150 40100 
20875 21380 

12910 13100 

39300 39300 
15599 16180 
1329 1347 

2638 2575 

4600 46115 
2S500 262S0 
SWS0 11300 
3S0.3350 


CIR 

CradlhU 

asMr 

Finmeccanica 
Generali 
IFi 

llalcem 
(taigas 
Italmobiiiare 

Man IraSro' 

Olivetti 
Pirelli 
RAS 

Rl nasce nte 

SfllPCfTl J -«~«^ee 

S«m Pools Torino loooo 10*75 

Sir 4400 irix 

SMC jSi 

Ink anm: 3115 

stands 36000 3S200 

SM S3S3 S460 

Tara Assl RlSO 27BOa 27600 
MIBMmrMJZS 


Montreal 

Alcan Aluminum 32 33 

Bank Montreal 27VB 2716 
Bell Canada 5IPfc 45 
Bombardier B 219k 22W 
Cgnblor 2096 21k, 

Cascades 7W 79e 

Dominion Text A 7V, 716 
Donahue A 28 28 

MacMillan Bl 21*k 22*k 
Natl Bk Canada “ — 


TW 

Quebecer A 

ftSSSi 8 

urn vo 
Vltteofron 

indesiri als inmn : moJS 
Pravloes : 197408 



Close Prev. 


SaoPaufo 


Banco da Brasil 

Banesna 

Bradesco 

Brahma 

Paranapanema 


Tclebras 
Vale RioDoce 
Varlg 

naB/Mk"" 


2709 28 

11.90 1109 
1570 15 

213 205 
2030 1900 
118 133 

151 165 


Singapore 

Cerebas 

gE°»- 

Froser Heave 
Gen firm 
Golden Hope Pi 
how Par 
Hume industries 


li 

Kcppci 
KLK enong 
LumCbana 
Malayan Banks 
OCBC 
OUB 
OUE 

Semfcenwng 
Shangrlla 
Slme Darinr 
SIA 

S'pare Land 
S^wre Press 

Sing stecanshlp 


7 JO 705 
6,35 605 
1100 11 
1600 1600 
1570 15.10 
274 273 
378 114 
408 5 

5 5.15 
9.95 970 
267 206 
IJ4 1-53 
8JKS 330 
1U0 1130 
7.10 63S 
600 1LS8 
1130 1130 
505 4.92 
300 300 
735 710 
530 5l5D 
1300 1370 
332 33B 


ST»re Telecomm 338 330 

Straits Trading 308 150 

(JOB 908 9.58 

UOL 105 100 

: 2 *nj 2 

nvviun . zmyJl 


Stockholm 


AGA 

Astro A 

Atlas Canca 

EteOrohncB 

Ericsson 

Esseite*A 

Hondelsbanken 

investors 

Norsk Hydro 

Procortfla AF 

Saxlvlk B 

5CA~A 

S-E Banken 

Stoidla F 

Sknnska 

SKF 

Stora 

Tretleborg BF 
Volvo 


597 592 

157 159 

491 492 

354 365 

345 352 

108 110 
111 112 
172 174 
2365024050 
112 116 
113 116 

125 138 

5350 54 

150 152 

175 179 

136 138 

395 403 

90 9000 
619 630 
173433 



Sydney 


900 904 
407 505 
T7J» 1708 

ig 33 

5 **5 
1704 17« 

.il 
2.10 2.10 
,309 XI2 
1102 1170 
934 935 

405 475 
308 307 
5.10 570 
ZfS 270 
2.18 276 
127 J25 

S-ea. i 8 

JJWMcBonkkig 478 408 
W00 «*»* ISA UO 

: 21ML80 


W lon 

Not Aust Bank 
News Corp 
Nlm Network 
N Broken Hill 
Poe D unlop 
Pioneer inn 
Nmnay Poseldor 
OCT Resources 


To Our Readers 

Paris closing stock 
prices were no! avail- 
able Tuesday due to 
problems at the 
source. We regret the 
inconvenience. 


dose Prev. 


Tokyo 


AfcOI Electr 
Asofil Chemical 
Asohl Glass 
Bank of Tokyo 
Bridgestone 
Conan 


495 593 
695 711 
1160 1140 
1530 1570 
1550 1560 
1690 1710 
1328' M 
Dai Nippon Print 1840 i860 
Daiwa House 1560 1570 
Dahra Securities 1610 1630 
Fonuc 
Full Bade 
Full Photo 

Hitachi 
Hitachi Cable 


MNIp 


ita Yokado 
Itochu 

Japan Airlines 
Kallmo 
Kansal Power 
Kawasaki Sleet 

Kirin Brewery 

Komatsu 
Kubota 
Kyocera 
Matsu Elec tnds 
Matsu Elec Wks 
Mitsubishi Bk 
Mitsubishi Kasai 
Mitsubishi Elec 
Mitsubishi Hev 
Mitsubishi Corp 
Mitsui and Co 
Mitsubishi 
Mitsumi 
NEC 

NGK Insulators 
Nlkko Securities 
Nippon Kooafeu 
Nippon Oil 
Nippon Steel 
Nippon Yusen 
Nissan 
Nomura Sec 
NTT 

Olympus OnHool 

Pioneer 

Ricoh 

■Sonya Elec 
Sharp 
Shlmazu 
Sblnelsu Cbetn 
Sony 

SumltamoBk 
Sumitomo Chem 
Suml Marine 
Sumitomo Melal 
Tai sri Corp 
Tgtsho Marine 
Tnfesda Chem 
TDK 
Tell In 

Tokyo Marine 
Tokyo Elec Pw 
Tuonan Printing 
Tor cry Ind. 
Toshiba 
Toyota 

Yamal chi Sac 


Conwest Expl 

Denison Min B 

Dickenson Min A 

Dofasoo 

Dylex A 

Echo Bay Mines 

Eoullr Silver A 

FCAintl 

Fed ind A 

Fletcher Chatl A 

FPI 

Gen fro 

GoldCoro 

Gutt Cda Res 

Hees Infl 

Hemto Gld Mines 

Hotnnger 

Horsham 

Hudson's Bay 

Imasco 

loco 

Interarav pipe 
Jannock 
Labott 
LoWov/CO 

Mackenzie 
Manna Hill A 
Maple Leaf 
Maritime 
Mark Res 
Mod-Ban Hunter 
Matson A 
Noma Ind A 
Norando Inc 
Norondo Forest 
Naim Energy 
Whom Telecom 
Nava Corp 
O shows 
Paourin A 
Plocer Dome 
Paco PetrnKwn 
PWA Corp 
Royrocfc 
RermSsscsnce 
Rogers B 
Rothmans 
Royal Bonk Can 
Sceptre Res 
ScotrsHaSP 




Sears Can 
Shell Can 
Sherrftf Gordon 
SHL System hse 
SouttKun 
■ or Aerospace 
Strict A 
Tails in an Enerv 
TeckB 

Thomson News 
Toronto Domn 
Torstar B 
Transolfa Util 
TronsCdo Pipe 
Triton Finl A 

Trlmoc 
Trine A 
Untoarp Enemy 

jssxurms 


Close Prev. 

22 23 

0.10 0LI3 
9 9 

23V« 23'A 
009 058 
ITAi. 18\k 
O.90 0S4 
J *6 3J0 
7% 74V 

W1 30H, 
435 5 

05 3 0-57 
12* 13 

420 
14% 

14 14% 
151* 1J4V 
2D Vi 2M4 
79Vj 3m 
38W 38?V 
34Ml 369V 
31fe 3166 
1« 191* 
21M 22 vi 
241* 25>A 
11H 11« 

69 V. 71 Vi 

13 13 

25 25Vj 
7% 8 

16% Iftji 
26'-i 27 

69k 66t 
25V6 259V 
13+. 14VV 
1SW 15Vj 
4M4 41V: 

10 IffKi 
2 m 22VV 
335 305 
34V6 349b 
91* 10 

109 1.11 

law is* 

2BVS 2B9V 
221* 221% 
84 83Vk 
28 28V5 
12kk 12H 

40 ARfe 

8 a 

389t 40 

T2Vk TSflV 
9 W W 
20 

T79b 1796 
&W 9 
3M* 32 

26W 271* 
17% 18 

21% 219fc 
24Vl 249V 

M» 15% 

19 19 

405 420 
179b 1794 
003 084 
155 100 

8777 


U.S. FUTURES 


Vic A»ocxrf*d Prec 


Season Season 
Hljtn Low 


Open Man Low Oove do 


Grains 

WHEAT (CBOT) 50ES!iurTwiiinuiTv.a}3anpcrbuiM 

372 180 AUy94 134 115’. 13D 

156 256 Jul94 UO'.-j Ul’i 378V, 37a94-a00L : 

3-57'« 102 Sea 94 132 3J3'5 13DV, 130%_4LC0’^ 

165 UP Dec« 142 142 339 139L— ODI»i 

154V, 134 Mar VS 301 -302 ^ 

335 XI6V f Mav«5 3JU — TLC2 1 - 

302V. Ill JulW 375 125 374 124 -002 

Est.sries 9000 Mon's, sales 14,95* 

Mon’s ocen ini 48036 off 134 
WHEAT (KBOT) SJXObu minimum. aottn per buUwi 
179V: 198 AAoy94 135 W4Vi 12T5 

155 197 JulW 3J0V, Ul V, 37891 37EV.-O01 I 

15SV, 302 M> Seo 94 131 to 133 ISO'S 138'i-IUIOV. 

300 112V: DEC 96 3J8to 300 136to 3J4to-O02to 

153 '6 333 Mar 95 UO'.t 

Est sates NA Aron's, solas 4004 
Mon's open bit 24996 ip. 167 
CORN (CBOT) !U08HinW(lnxvn-itaianpwnaM 
J-14 1 * 13StoMa/94l» LB6to 2049. 185 -001 to 11 
141 -M94 208 Vi IBPa 207V. 108 -a01V.il 


IHto 

192'* 

ZJ3M 

1799: 

182 

203 ^ 

1589V 


134 15 Dec M 202U 202V, Z40 


169toMav95 I71to 171V. 278V: 2JOto-O01to 
170 W Jut 95 173 173to 172 V. 27316— 001 to 

150^. Doc 95 252 153 1SW. 151 -801'A 

Estsfflte 3QMQ iMmfS. sales 31082 
Man's opal lot 324.M2 up 914 
SOYBEANS ICBOT) UHB.niMnu»MnMrgwM 
701 5.92V, May 94 6.92 6.93 6J8U 408V. -<3. 02V. 

194toJUl94 694 695 690*6 69016-0X091 

63B Aug 94 667 6 37Vi 60719 40Jl»-aB2to 

617 S»H 648V. 669 66456 6449,-0X0 

55556 Nov 94 655 65556 651 65154-O02V. 

6IBtoJcn9S 6S0 600V. 657 657 -001 V, 

4.42 Mar 95 643V. 643V, 602 642 to -001 V, 

653 Moy95 643to 64315 662 *029,-001 V. 

6J2toJul9S 665 605 6*3 603to— 0JH 

50V6Nov95 621 622 619to 619to-O07to 

EsL sales 25000 MonVsales 27000 
Men’s open kn 159336 up 2015 
SOYBEAN MEAL ICBOT) lOOMns-doWnncrkw 
MM 1 0550 MaY 94 19650 19400 19570 19610 —070 ' 

1900a Jut 94 ma 19700 19610 l«6ffl -000! 

18900 AUO 94 196410 19630 I960) 19520 — OJO 
18670 Sep 94 194J0 19630 19140 193JD -650 . 

107.100094 19150 19200 191-50 191.90 -0.10 1370 

400 Dec 94 191 JO IV! JO I90J0 19000 

18650 Jon 75 191 JO 191 JO 1 9070 1«0O 
1 8700 Mar 95 192J0 19200 19170 19170 
18800 May 95 19150 19150 19230 19230 
Esi. sales 10000 Mon's, soles 10371 
Man's Open kit 79091 Off SM 
SOYBEAN CHE ICBOT) MIU- WTOm >«ta. 

3H4S 2100 May 94 9858 2BJ0 MJS MJB 

»J0 2135 Jut 94 2U0 »9S 2170 M73 


7 JO 

70S 

6B9to 

7J7y, 

670 

is* 

675 

65Qh 


23000 
221 El 
21000 
20600 
20900 
20000 
19400 
19150 


-000 

-100 

-030 


Toronto 


Abttlbi Price 
‘ ikp Eapie 
. .„ Canado 
Atoerta Energy 
Am Bmrtck Res 
BCE 

Bk Nwa Scotia 

BC Telecom 
BP Realty Hds 
Bromatea 
Brunswick 

CAE 
Co mdev 
CIBC 

Canadian Podflc 2Kb 
Con Tire A life 

Cantor «5 

Care 64s 

CCL Ind B BM 

Clnedex 4. <5 

Cominco 28 Ve 


17fe 

17U, 

7 

19to 

3SMi 

2 

24VS 


9fe 

7 

40 

32fe 


17% 

17% 

7Hr 

TM 

35*, 

519V 

20 % 

life 

25 

004 

007 

9to 

7 

480 

33fe 

22fe 

life 

46 

4to 

9 

400 

2DV2 


Zurich 

. to Inti B 222 23 

Alusutsse B new 660 66 
BBC Brwn Bov B 1186 118 
a&TGeisy B 905 91 

CS Holdings B 637 65 
Eiektrow B 3845 

Fischer B 1300 128 

Interdlseount B 2450 2*5 
Jel/noD B 800 CS 

■ ndls Gvr R 940 M 
MaewenelckB 430 43 

Nestle R 1215 12% 

Ocrilk. Buchrie R 12a IS 


23 JO 
2SA0 
TIM 
2705 
2405 
2665 
2660 
2640 


2105 Aug 94 2650 
2200 Sep « 2830 
22.10 Ori 94 2700 
0.90 Dec 94 2670 
2205 Jan 95 2650 
2500 Mar 95 2630 
250OMoy95 
2630 Jut « 


2700 

2673 


2730 2739 

2709 2709 

8650 2653 


ESL sales 12000 MorfLiries 9385 
Man's open ii* 101158 up 68 


2605 

25.95 


-0.19 7.102 


-005 

—415 

— 0.10 


Livestock 


CATTLE (CMS1) euWm-cmPpwn. 


82.75 

75J7 

7187 

7407 

7400 

7405 

75.10 


7300 Are 94 7697 
TIJSJunM J4JS 
7Q0OAUB94 7235 
71. 07CkS 94 7337 
7205 Dec 94 74BB 
7300 Feta 95 TSJ7 
7300 Apr 95 7675 


7707 

7657 

7202 

730S 

7402 

7300 

7480 


7652 

7302 

7205 

7X55 

7307 

7172 

7475 


7655 

7107 

7200 

7380 

7305 

7172 

7677 


PargesaHMB 
Ruche Hefts PC 
Safro RgwbOc 

Surveillance B 
Swiss Bnk Cars B 
Swiss Rriraur R 

Swissair R 
UBS B 
Winterthur B 
Zurich Ass B 

SiSSiiSBJ 


For 

investment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 

every Salurday 

in fhe IHT 


Est. safes 8012 Mon's. siA* 167S* 

Mon'i event* 32333 Oh 321 
FEEDER CATTLE (CMERI Ap»l»-p«iwe 
8505 79J2*tar94 «0O 10 JL5D 81 J5 

8540 7900 Apr 91 Hl^ 81.10 

8400 7800 May 94 80.92 Kt95 8077 BO.77 

0300 7905 AUO 94 |JJ» BI35 81^0 

8170 7900 Sep 94 B1XK 81.15 8100 H0O 

8105 7900 Ori9C SSL 90 1690 0072 8672 

8040 773l&9* 8105 8100 8100 Sl-M 

0690 7940 Jon 96 _ ®02 

Est. sates ha Mon^. soles 1,195 
Man's Open tnr 7ZS75 00. 5B 

hogs irtyimi MnsL-amKrA 

5L« tSwfi «-17 46B 4U0 

5627 4507Jun« BAD ag 3147 SLI2 

450QJUI94 5252 5200 5200 5005 

TliW 460SAUO94 5670 5675 5620 5625 

4975 Zuoaw 4400 4600 4601 46.NI 

S0J0 4500 Dec *4 4700 4700 4690 4605 

ffltg 4700 Feb 9S 47,10 4700 4695 4705 

4600 4000 Apr 95 4505 4500 4490 44.90 

51 JO 4905 Jw.95 . 4900 #00 4895 4693 

Est. sates M46 Merfs.jt*a 8023 
Man's open kit 31051 rtf 203 
PORK BELLIES [CMER) AMto-crartfc 
<1 Bn 40JBMOV94 5665 5700 5607 5635 

6700 9k»Xr94 5690 57 JO 5600 5655 

gun 420OAUB«4 5655 5505 5405 5407 

ITS JMOfSw S7J5 5700 57.10 5700 

6090 M0oJvSr95 5705 5705 5695 5697 

6100 59.90 Mav 95 . S7J0 

EsLsrtes 3034 Mon’s. sales 2.172 
Man's open int 9047 up 115 


-405 29071 
-063 25. MS 
—630 13034 
-005 1O0» 
—003 2062 
-0.05 U3S 
—601 125 


PJS4 
-6.15 XID 6 
-613 

—608 2.789 
-ttlj 477 
-60S 579 

144 
22 


-4L32 6494 
-630 13060 
-6.17 4077 
—605 2JB7 
— 0JS0 7.768 
-635 2070 

-afs 2 » 

—605 167 

—630 28 


-630 4.901 
—600 30*0 
-603 598 

—605 761 

-603 to 
—630 8 


i Season Season 


MM 




High 

Low Open 

rtflh 

Low 

dose 

Q« 

OpJnt 

tlSD 

9.15 Jul to 1X20 

1237 

JXto 

1X» 

-037 36013 

29 11.98 

9.420094 1180 

1101 

IIS 

1104 

-033 31028 

1102 

9.17Mor95 1103 

1105 

1101 

11-33 

-0.15 16116 

* UJB 

1007 May 95 



1107 

-0.1/ 

1,919 

1 11.0 

1657 Jul 95 



1100 

— 0.11 

1065 

1 1M> 

100700 » 



1177 

—an 

334 

- EsL srtes 31,700 Mon'S. SC’s 695B 




( Men's own irr 14n018 off 

1094 





COCOA (I4CSE) lomerrtctoH-iptr ion 




1368 

978 May 94 1141 

1165 

1147 

1155 

♦2 30822 

3 .365 

999 Jul to 1181 

1195 

11/8 

1185 

+2 2X953 

S 077 

1020 SCO 94 1207 

1211 

1305 

1210 

+5 

7094 

» 1389 

1041 Dec M 1242 

1254 

1240 

1246 

+ 2 

M30 

3 087 

1077Marf5 1Z77 

1288 

1274 

1279 


9014 

6 1400 

1111 May 95 



1302 

+ 2 

6504 

1 1407 

1225 Jut 95 



13« 

+2 


3 1350 

133SW95 



13© 

+2 

681 

1437 

1338 DOC 95 



1366 

+2 

205 

Est. solas 8001 Mon's, soles 2X116 




Mon’s open int 880X7 off *m 





i ORANGE JUICE INCTTO !UOSia.-citosiMrRi 



2 135.09 

DJBMayM 11050 

11105 

no 

I10J5 

-80S 

8322 

i ns no 

1 03-50 Jul 94 11300 

11611 

ran 

111* 

—1.15 

5041 

1 13400 

10SJDSM>94 11600 

11600 

11501 

115.90 

-105 

2708 

13600 

HBOaNOvM 11400 

11401 

11415 

11413 

—1.15 

1,164 

0200 

HO0OJ<m95 11500 

1150C 

11501 

11575 

— 005 

2086 

12625 

HMJ»*far95 11700 

1 1700 

/rx* 

11600 

— 1.W 

291 

Est. srtes 1300 Men's, soles 3000 




| Mon'booenkit 






1 

Metals 




HI GRADE COPPER (NCMXJ 254X10 

ns.- can* Mr la. 



1 10700 

7X00 Mar M 9000 

9060 

V.ia 

89.15 

—170 

755 

r 9325 

7450 Apr M 9060 

9060 

H9.20 

8975 

—1.45 

1,119 

1 10220 

7300 May to 9000 

9080 

8920 

8935 

-130 40932 

91J0 

7670041 to 9020 

KL20 

19-60 

8235 

—175 

867 f 

10X95 

76»AUto 9000 

9005 

8970 

B9J5 

-170 142 » 

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89-80 

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9105 

7300 Aug 95 90.10 

9020 

8970 

8935 

—1.15 






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73000095 90.15 

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8930 

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Vac’s owners to announce it would,' 
pull out of the company unless nq» 
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pulled out over the last five week^ 
and Bertelsmann was forced to fqjn 
low in order lo avoid being tbe sole 
owner of Vool German law forbids; 
a company to own a majority stake 
in a tefeviaan station. 

The Cologne-based channel was - 
originally set up to provide Ugb-i 9 
quality news and documentaries.* 


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Ciba-Geigy Net 
Rises but Payout 
Is Call ed Slim 


ConfiUed by Our Staff From Dispatches 

BASEL, Switzerland — Ciba- 
Gejgy AG on Tuesday reported 
1993 profit in line with expecta- 
tions, bat the stock price fell on 
what some analysts said was disap- 
pointment with the dividend. 

The chemical and pharmaceuti- 
cal concern said it bad profit of 
1.78 billion Swiss francs ($13 bil- 
lion) in 1993, 1 1 percent above its 
restated 1992 profit of 1.6 billion 
francs, because of higher sales, bet- 
ter productivity and cost controls. 

But the dividend of 13 francs a 
share announced by the company, 
while it was one franc above the 
1 992 payout and was consistent with 


Large Provisions 
Seen as Drag for 
Deutsche Bank 

Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatcher 

FRANKFURT — Deutsche 
Bank AG said Tuesday that net 
profit for the parent bank rose only 
1 percent in 1993, to 1.403 billion 
Deutsche marks ($838 million). 

Analysts, noting that several of 
the bank's foreign units have report- 
ed strong earning s, warned that it 
would be wrong to draw conclusions 
yet about consolidated profit, due 
for release on Thursday. That figure 
had risen 20.7 percent, to 3.76 tril- 
lion DM, in the first 10 months. 

They said that consolidated 
profit was likely to show a rise of 10 
percent to 13 percent due to sharp 
gains from commissions, trading 
on its own account and lending. 
But large risk provisions were ex- 
pected to clip returns. 

The bank also announced that it 
would raise its dividend to 16.50 
DM for 1993 from 15 DM for 1992. 

‘'Commerzbank’s and Dresdnef s 
results are likely to show higher 
growth of 18 percent and 13 to 16 
percent," said Ernst von Randow, 
an analyst at Bankhaus Metzler. 

(Bloomberg, /toners) 


forecasts, met with mixed reactions. 

“The dividend was in line with 
the market but was a little bit light 
for my liking," Robin Campbell, an 
analyst with CS First Boston in 
London, said. “It looks like Ciba 
thinks capital appreciation is what 
investors should be looking for." 

It looked like investors thought 
otherwise as the company’s class B 
shares fell 10 francs, to 905, on 
Zurich’s stock exchange- 

“It was a good result from Ciba, 
but suddenly the sellers were there 
putting pressure on the stock,” said 
Beat Graf, a trader at Union Bank 
of Switzerland in Zurich. 

Other analysts, however, said 
±ey were inclined to revise their 
1994 forecasts upward. 

They said the profit improve 
improvement bad been achieved 
despite an unexpectedly large re- 
structuring charge of 300 million 
francs, compared with 200 milli on 
francs in 1992. 

“The results show that cost re- 
ductions are coming through," an- 
other analyst, who asked not to be 
identified, said. 

Alex Kroner, the chairman, said 

Ciba would proceed with plans to 
make and sell a generic version of 
the anri-ulcer drug Zantac, one of 
the world’s best-sdlmg drugs and a 
major product of Ctba’s British ri- 
val, Glaxo Holdings PLC. The pat- 
ent on a version of the chemical in 
Zantac expires in January 1996. 

Ciba left open the possibility that 
it might soon seek listings in other 
markets. The company restated its 
1992 results last year to conform 
with international accounting stan- 
dards, a change it made to prepare 
for listings elsewhere, particularly in 
the United Stales. 

Mr. Krauer said he expected far- 
ther improvement in Ora’s operat- 
ing performance this year, but he 
cautioned that whether that im- 
provement showed up in the bot- 
tom line would depend on "the 
timing of the economic upswing in 
Europe and the impact of ex- 
change-rate movements.” 

(Bloomberg, Reuters ) 


German Carmakers Turn a Comer 

Analysts Bullish on Volkswagen and BMW Shares 


By Ferdinand Protzman 

New Fork Times Service 

BONN — After two years of 
plu nging sales and profits lor Ger- 
man auto makers, analysts are rec- 
ommending the stocks on signs 
that healthier times are ahead. 

While analysts differ on which 
German auto stock is most at- 
tractive, they are nearly unani- 
mous in their enthusiasm for the 
rector. Two current favorites are 
Volkswagen AG, Europe’s big- 
gest car maker, and Bayeriscbe 
Motoren Werke AG, the maker 
of BMW automobiles and motor- 
cycles. 

Although the companies re- 
cently posted weak results for 
1993, analysts say the companies 
will fare much belter this year 
and are likely to show outstand- 
ing gains in 1995. 

The optimism is fueled in part 
by sentiment that the economy in 
Germany and across Europe will 
soon begin to recover from reces- 
sion, particularly in the latter half 
of tins year. Another reason lies 
in the United States, where both 
companies posted sales gains in 
the first two months of tms year. 

‘'Prospects for the German au- 
tomobile industry are starting to 
brighten up for 1994," said Lothar 
Lumnetzki, automotive analyse at 
Trinkaus Capital Management, in 
DOsseddorf. “Although new-vehi- 
de registrations in Germany will 


again decline slightly, there are mi- 
tral signs of improvement in the 
field of exports.* 

Much of drat improvement has 
been in North America, which 
Ferdinand PiSch, the chairman of 
Volkswagen, called “the most im- 
portant auto market in the 
world.” It is also where his com- 
pany has experienced such severe 
problems in the last few years 
that there were rumors it would 
abandon the market. 

In the first two months of this 
year. North American sales of 
Volkswagen and Audi, its wholly 
owned subsidiary, rose to 16,286 
units from 7,281 a year earlier. 

In 1993, sales fell to 62,072 units 
from 90,626 the previous year, 
partially because Volkswagen 


dealers bad no cars to sell North 
America was supposed to be sup- 
plied by Volkswagen's production 
plant in Puebla, Mexico. But the 
new Golf and Jena models bade 
there had such severe quality 
problems that they could not be 
delivered to dealers. A team of 
Volkswagen engineers was dis- 
patched to straighten out the 
problems, and Mr. Piecfa said cars 
built in Mexico now meet Germa- 
ny’s high quality standards. 

A rebound in the United 
States, combined with stringent 
cost-cutting measures in domes- 
tic operations, should help VW 
recover from a 1.94 billion Deut- 
sche mark (SI billion) loss in 
1993. Sales declined 10 percent 
last year, to 7 6.59 billion DM. A 


smaller loss is expected this year, 
followed by a profit in 1995. 

But Joachim Bemsdorff, auto 
analyst at Bank Julius BSr (Deut- 
schland ), said VW had sot solved 
the centra] problem of reducing its 
workforce and that a return to 
profitability' would take longer. 

He r e commended switching to 
BMW shares from Volkswagen. 
BMW has weathered the reces- 
sion weQ, although its profit fell 
29 percent, 516 trillion DM in 
1993. on sales of 28.9 billion DM. 

BMW sales have risen in the 
United States, where it sold 
78,000 cars in 1993, making it the 
leading European car exporter in 
the U.S. market for the first time. 

BMW has received a big boost 
from the 51.2 billion acatrisitioD 


Otl the Move 

Share prices in Deutsche marks. 

900 




0 N D J F M 
‘93 I '94 


Source: Bloomberg 


nrr 


of Rover Group PLC in January. 
The acquisition of Rover will 
roughly double BMW’s market 
share in Europe, to 6 J percent. 

It expands BMW’s product 
range into small cars and ion r- 
whedklrive sport-utility vehicles, 
while giving the company access to 
low-cost production in Britain. 

Bui Karsten Rahlf, automotive 
analyst at MM. Warburg & Co., a 
private bank based in Hamburg, 
said Rover changes BMW from a 
luxury car maker to more of a 
mass-marker producer. Because of 
heavy financing costs, he said he 
did not expect Rover to contribute 
to BMW’s profit for ax years. 


New Orders for BMW Gits Rise as Smaller Line a Hit 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispardtes 
MUNICH — New orders for cars from 
Bayerische Motoren Werke AG rose in the 
first quarter, compared with a year ago, mostly 
in response to the launch of smaller models 
and the 3 Series, the company said Tuesday. 

The number of orders placed in the first 
quarter was “sharply" higher and sales rose 
2.7 percent, possibly si gnaling a recovery in 
the market, the company said. Sales in the 
first quarter rose to 73 trillion Deutsche 
marks ($5 billion) from 73 billion DM in the 
same period of 1993. 

“A lasting change in the economic situa- 
tion is not yet in right, but the expected 
recovery of economic growth might end stag- 
nation of the car market in 1 994, a company 
spokesman said. 


BMW predicted the slight growth in sales 
would continue for the rail year, accompa- 
nied by an increase in earnings. 

Its car deliveries held steady at 137300 in 
the first three months while car production 
dropped 7 percent, partially because of a 
wont-force reduction and partially because of 
fewer working days than the previous year. 

The company said it did not expect the 
acquisition of Rover Group PLC to be a drag 
on profits. BMW is paying Rover’s former 
majority owner, British Aerospace PLC, £800 
million (Si billion) for 80 percent Rover and 
will take on £900 million of debts and liabil- 
ities. BMW is buying out Honda Motor Co.’s 
20 percent minority holding as wefl. 

Volker Doppdfdd, the chief financial offi- 


cer of BMW, said fmnnrial data on Rover 
that BMW obtained since the purchase of the 
company presented a better picture than 
those at its disposal before the takeover. 

“We can now- say that in the medium and 
long teem. Rover is more interesting and better 
positioned than we bad thought,” be said. 

Bemd Pischeisrieder. the president of 
BMW, said he expected cooperation with 
Honda over new Rover models to continue. 

“As far as we are concerned, cooperation 
with Honda over Rovers 200, 400 and 600 
models will continue in the longer term,” he 
said, but be added that BMW had no con- 
crete cooperation agreement with Honda. 
“But we have no indication that they don't 
want to." 

(AFP, Reuters, AFX) 


Investor’s Europe 









& 


Sources: Reuters, AFP 


iManabfjml HenU Triton* 


Very briefly: 


it rose 11 percent in 1993. 
to 2J)3 biffion guilders ($1.1 biUion), and died expansion in Eastern 
Europe and the Far East 

• Arbed SA said it lost 5.7 bnHon Luxembourg francs (SI65 million) in 
1993 because of the slump in the seed industry last year. 

• George Soros has taken a stake in ONA, Morocco's leading private 
business group. 

• Svenska Cellulose AB said its plan to buy nearly 90 percent of the 
French packaging group Otor Heading SA had hit a delay after discus- 
sions with shareholders. 

• The European Comutission said it would not examine a proposed joint 
venture between British TdeconumuDcatioos PLC and Banco de Santan- 
der because the Spanish banking concern was bdow its minimum size for 
examining such transactions. 

• Trenhand, the German privatization agency, will allow Elf Aquitaine to 
cut the annual capacity of the planned 43 billion Deutsche mark (S2.6 
billion) refinery in Leuna from 10 million metric tons to 9 million. ' 

• Russia and Cuba readied an accord to exchange 23 million metric tons 

of crude oil for 1 milli on metric tons of Cuban sugar cane, the Interfax 
news agency said Tuesday. AFP, Knight- Ridder. Reuters, ap 


4 Spanish Banks Enter 
Auction for Banesto 


Metallgesellschaflt Braces for Round 2: The Annual Meeting 


By Brandon Mitchener 

International Herald Tribune 

FRANKFURT - Ronaldo 
Schmitz, the embattled chairman 
of the supervisory board of MetaU- 
gesellschaft AG, defended his mis- 
takes Tuesday as born of ignorance 
and not effort 

Attempting to dispel doubts 
about his leadership that threaten 
to dominate a shareholders meet- 
ing Wednesday, Mr. Schmitz lev- 
cled new allegations against the 
company's former managing direc- 
tor, Heinz Schimmelbusch. 

"It’s one of the biggest disap- 
pointments for the supervisory 
board, to put it mildly, that we 
sniffed around a lot of affairs that 
turned out to be absolutely, even 
laughably irrelevant, while the cat- 
astrophic situation lay elsewhere,” 
Mr. Schmitz said, referring to trad- 
ing losses and liquidity problems 


that brought the company to the 
brink of bankruptcy. 

Metallgesellschaft’s sharehold- 
ers and creditors approved a 2.7 
billion Deutsche mark ($2 billion) 
bailout in an extraordinary meeting 
on Feb. 24. 

At their annual meeting Wednes- 
day, shareholders are expected to 
discuss a rights issue and restruc- 
turing but also plan to continue 
their probe into the supervisory 
board’s knowledge of the oil fu- 
tures trading on the New York 
Mercantile Exchange that led to 
the crisis in November. 

Mr. Schmitz, also a board mem- 
ber of Deutsche Bank AG, one of 
Metallgesellschaft’s largest share- 
holders, has accused Mr. Schim- 
melbusch of grave mismanage- 
ment. Mr. Schimmelbusch, a 
respected business leader until the 
trading crisis emerged, in turn has 
accused Mr. Schmitz of having 


turned a liquidity problem into 23 
billion DM in losses. 

In response to the persistent sug- 
gestion that the supervisory board 
chairman fell asleep at the wheel 
Mr. Schmitz insisted he had gone 
“above and beyond the call of duly 
with this company." 

Mr. Schmitz also dismissed sug- 
gestions that he should have under- 
stood the risks involved in oil fu- 
tures trading because he once 
served as supervisory board chair- 


man of WintershaH AG, a German 
oil and gas company. “I was never 
in the oil hedging business, he said, 
“and no one at Deutsche Bank un- 
derstands this business, either.” 

Mr. Schmitz repeated allegations 
that Mr. Schimmelbusch withheld 
information necessary to judge the 
soundness of the oQ fixtures trading 
that provoked the crisis. 

“If anyone had ever told us there 
were a problem, there would have 
been action,” he said. “The affair 


would have come to light, we would 
have seen the danger much earlier 
and possibly avoided the full extent 
of the losses." 

He also accused Mr. Schimmd- 
busch of deceiving the supervisory 
board on other issues. “He certain- 
ly didn’t tell us the whole truth 
about the smelting operations,” he 
said, referring to Mctailgesclls- 
chaft’s zinc and lead refining activi- 
ties, which posted a loss last year. 

Mr. Schimmelbusch could not be 


reached for c ommen t Asked when 
he first became aware of liquidity 
problems at Metallgesellschaft’s 
UJL trading subsidiary, MG Carp., 
Mr. Schmitz said “a few days be- 
fore Dec.3.” 

Same German journalists caught 
wind of the problems earlier, he 
said. 

He denied German press reports 
that he had begun to worry about 
the scope of the oil hedging opera- 
tions as early as July. 


EU Commission Moves Toward lifting Banana Quotas 


For investment information 

Read THE MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday in the IHT 


By Tom Buerkle 

International Herald Tribute 
BRUSSELS — The European 
Commission said Tuesday it agreed 
with several Latin American coun- 
tries to raise its banana import quo- 
tas but the move failed to satisfy 
Germany, which indicated it would 
continue legal action to overturn 
the quotas. 

Agriculture Commissioner Ren6 
Stochen said the European Union 
would increase its import quota of 


On May 16th, the IHT will publish a Special 
Report on 


Chile 


Among the topics to be covered are: 

■ Chile’s trade with NAFTA nations. 

■ Prospects for continued rapid economic 
expansion. 

■ Efforts to preserve Chile’s natural 
resources. 

■ Profile of the world’s largest copper 
producer. 

■ A gas pipeline from Argentina to Chile’s 
main cities. 

For information about advertising in this Special 
Report ; piease contact Juanita Caspari in Paris at 
(33-1)463793 76. 

leralhSE@rti>u»e 


PUBLISH KD wrm THU NEW ynpK TIMES AND THE WASHINGTON POST 


2 million tons for bananas from 
mostly Latin countries to 2.1 mil- 
lion tons this year and 22 million 
in 1995, and reduce the tariff on 
those bananas to 75 European Cur- 
rency Units (586) a ton from 100 
Ecus. Bananas have a market val- 
ued at $2 bfflion a year in Europe. 

In exchange, Colombia, Costa 
Rica, Nicaragua and Venezuela 
agreed to drop their action 
launched within the General 
Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 
against the quota system. 

The agreement did not involve 
Guatemala, which along with the 
other four countries had pressed 
the GATT case, nor did it include 
Panama and Ecuador, top banana 
exporters that have fought the quo- 
tas outside GATT. 


Jochen Borchert, Bonn's farm 
minister, told fellow EU agricul- 
ture ministers at a meeting here 
that the quota increase was a step 
in the right direction for Germany, 
the world's most voracious con- 
sumer of bananas. But he said 
Bonn would need to see all Latin 
countries agree to the new regime 
before considering d roppin g its 
lawsuit against the quotas in the 
European Court of Justice. 

Other German officials were 
more critical at a meeting of the 
Union's so-called 1 13 trade commit- 
tee, saying Boon wanted to Hi the 
quota to 23 million tons with subse- 
quent increases of 5 percat a year. 


“There's no reason to artificially 
raise prices” with quotas, said a 
spokesman for Germany’s EU mis- 
sion. “The first concern of the 
Union must be the needs aS their 
own people." 

Guatemala, Panama and Ecua- 
dor will have the possibility of in- 


men t, but only the four countries 
that signed the pact mil be guaran- 
teed higher shipments, the spokes- 
man said. 

The accord does not affect a quo- 
ta of roughly 800,000 tons a year 
that is reserved for former colonies 
of EU countries such as the Ivory 
Coast, Cameroon and St. Lucia. 


Reuters 

MADRID — The Spanish au- 
thorities unveiled terms Tuesday for 
tbc auction ofamajority stake in the 
troubled banking group Banco Es- 
pafiol de Crtdito SA, widely known 
as Banesto, and four other banks 
immediately declared an interest in 
taking over their former rival 
Banco Santander SA, Banco Bil- 
bao Vizcaya SA, Banco Popular SA 
and the- state-owned Arge n t a ria 
Corporaddn Bancaria de Espaffa 
SA registered for the auction ot 450 
million shares, or 73.45 percent, of 
the bank’s capital 
Registration for the auction 
rives the four banks the right to 
detailed documentation an Ban- 
esto. They have until April 25 to 
make an offer, and the wmner will 
be announced on May 9. 

Following a restructuring valued 
at S43 billion, Banesto will cut its 
capital by 48.8 biffion pesetas (5355 
million), to 65.1 billion pesetas, 
and the Deposit Guarantee Fund 
for Spanish banks will inject 180 
billion pesetas in new capital. 

Market sp ecul at ion has put the 
likely price ar between 400 and 450 
pesetas a share. Banks are unwilling 
to pay much more t han the nominal 
pace of 400 pesetas at which 8133 
million shares, or 1337 percent, wiU 
be offered to existing shareholders, 
Banesto shares, which dosed at 
740 pesetas on Tuesday, surged to a 
peak of 850 pesetas last week cm 
speculation ahead of the recent 
shareholders’ meeting that ap- 
proved the rescue plan. 

Spain’s central bank dismissed 


the old Banesto board on Dec. 28. 
but it has ensured the indepen- 
dence of Banesto by stipulating 
that the auction winner must hot 
break it up or engineer a mereerfor 
four years. The central barm disc 
said the anction winner was obliged 
to hold a controlling 30 percent 
stake in Banestoduring this period. 


EU Sees Role 
For Film Taxes 

Return 

BRUSSELS — The Europe 
an Union should develop an 
ambitious industrial policy to 
help its unprofitable film and 
television program industries 
fight off competition from 
Hollywood, according to a 
draft EU Commission paper.' 

The draft offered a glimpse 
into the action the Ellis corf- 
sukring to help fight HoUy? 
wood domination or European 
cinemas and television. It said 
US. films had a market share 
.of 80 percent in the EU. 

It said that both the EU and 

national governments needed 
to find a “critical mass” of 
funding to boost the industry 
and mentioned the possibility 
of a levy on cinema tickets, 
broadcasting receipts and vid- 
eo rentals as fioancmg sources. 




Pirelli 
Is Raising 
Capital 

CarqrUedbyOurSufffFmmDispatdm 

MILAN — Pirelli SpA,a 
maker of tires and cables, said 
Tuesday that it would sdl 1 
trillion tire ($61 1 million) 
worth of convertible brads, 
and that its Dutch tire subsid- 
iary would raise about 5266 
minion through a share issue. 

Pireffi said il would post a net 

consolidated loss for 1993 that 
would be less substantial than 
the 154 hT|fr» lire loss in 1992 
The company has lost money 
the past three years due to over- 
capacity and the recession. 

Pirelli shares fell 98 lire on 
Tuesday, to dose at 2309 lire. 
The convertible bonds, avail- 
able to shareholders on the ba- 
sis of one bond for every four 
shares held, will be priced at 
between 2,000 and 3,000 lire 
and will be converted one 
bond for one new share. 

Pirelli will use part of the 
proceeds to subscribe to the 
issue for its 71 percent-owned 
Pirelli Tire Holdings NV. 

The Dutch unit will raise 
about 500 million guilders 
through an offer of 3 1 .022 mil- 
lion shares on the basis of one 
new for every three old, at a 
nominal 10 guilders a share. 

Pirelli Tire shares fell 0.10 
guilder to dose Tuesday at 
17.80. (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 


Page 13-® 
— ne _ 


-.1 


*>8- 


Japan to End Restraints 
On Auto Exports to U.S. 

Rv ;> n . Tl 11 < 


ASIA/PACIFIC \»‘ 


But American officials point to the auto program as 
evidence that Japan is willing to agree to specific 
numbers if the situation demands them. Japan has 
arjpted that voluntarily restricting exports is possible 
while assuring that imports reach a certain level is 
beyond tbe government s control. 

Japan also has restraints on exports of cars to 
Europe, although in that case, the ceilings are negoti- 
ated- In the case of the United States, Japan's trade 


By Andrew Pollack 

■ *^^££*t*** — - iu 

■sSSSF- 

petition. But the reeling from Japanese com- 

troil’s Big WmES *! ^ ^ the case of the United States, Japan'.' 

quality ezn wiiTjarS 31 ^ - y hav ™E narrowed the ministry unilaterally sets the ceiling each year, 
me Ammran market™^ U ’ Creasme lheir share °f The ministry decided to institute the ceilings in 
- ' The export restraints haw* r«» , - I ME in part to predude the U.S. Congress from 

''cSSSSSSPS ^^“-Taavra 

United Stales will totaTabom l 400mo S< d^?i l fr!^ , But the voluntary restraints helped cause big 
; 1,570,000 a year earfe SwifllK m the indusny. Pardy becaus^ number df 

export ceiling of LftOOOO ™ ^ 011X031 vehicles they could export were limited, Japanese 

. For that reason, the US. BnvprT>mi»n«ic««,«r«o, companies began shifting from the economy cars they 

edtoWmuch^^fn^/s”^^ 

mcnL In recent trade talks with r an -„ ™ “P 011 ceilings also spurred the Japanese com- 

has been much more interested k e^dumeroorts pameS Jewries in the United Slates. Now the 

of American products to Janan thar^rSvS^m! ? Mn P ames m shiftmg production to those transplant 
ports of Japm^pr^ Wocfang because of pohdcal pressures and bemuse 

- - ® ut .^ Mne US. auto executives have argued that if 
is too high, it should be leered, not 

Perhaps out of caution, therefore, Japan waited 
_ tfntu just before the end of its fiscal year. And it maH«» 
r mmoujeeanent on a day the news would be over- 
shadowed by a bigger announcement of measures to 
open its markets. 

■ . In announcing the decision at a news conference, 
rliroshi Kn maga i, the mini si er of international trade 
Md industry, said one reason Japan was elimina ting 
the auto export ceding? was that the world trade treaty 
reac h e d in December under the auspices of the Gener- 
’’ *1 Agreement on Tariffs and Trade called for phasing 
" out programs such as vbluntaiy export restraints/ 

In recent trade talks, Japan has resisted Washing- 
ton's pursuit of numerical targets for opening its 
markets. 


political pressures 

tbe rise of the yen has made exporting from Japan 
unprofitable. 


Honda Motor Co. and Mazda Motor Coip. said 
they would uy to increase their imports to ease trade 
tensions with the United States, but only on certain 
conditions, Agence France-Presse reported 
Honda said it had set goals for increased purchases 
of American-made auto parts for its operations in the 
United States and for its imports of parts, vehicles and 
other products worldwide, but it said this was not an 
“enforceable commitment.” 

Mazda also said it expected to buy more American- 
made and other imported auto parts in future years, 
but only if overseas suppliers “become more competi- 
tive and work jointly with us in our development and 
production processes.” 


* 4 




Moody’s Rates Manila Banks 


Reuters 

* HONG KONG — Moody’s In- 
vestors Service Inc. on Tuesday set 
ratings on debt of two Philippine 
banks for the first time since the 
country’s debt crisis in the 1980s. 

The credit-rating concern as- 
signed a Ba-3 rating to S17S ariBioa 
of 8 percent Euronotes doe 1998 
issued by Development R«tnir of the 
Philippines and gave the same rating 
to a privately placed medium-term 
rioteprogram of about $400 motion 
by Philippine National Ranlr. 

An independent analyst, Marc. 
Faber, said: “I would say the debt 
rating is about where it should be. 
But it is typical of rating abodes 
that they lag behind the trend; 
They are lagging indicators and not 
. leading indicators.” 

Mr. Faber said he was concerned 


about problems facing the Philip- 
pines, specifically inflation and the 
growing divide between the rich 
and tbe poor. 

Moody’s also assigned ratings of 
Ba-3 and Not Prime to Develop- 
ment Bank fra its long-term and 
short-term foreign-currency depos- 
it obligations, respectively, and rat- 
ings of Baa-3 and Prime-3 for its 
long-term and short-term Philip- 
pine peso deposits. 

. Both banks were bailed out by 
the government in 1986 after they 
became insolvent because of loans 
made dining the rule of President 
Ferdinand E. Marcos, who was 
overthrown that year. 

Philippine National Bank, now 
57 percent government-owned, has 
a loan portfolio that is 80 patent 
short-term and is dominated by the 


biggest Philippine blue-chip com- 
panies and the government, Joey 
Salceda, head of research at Bar- 
ings Securities in Manila, said. 

“It deserves something much 
better” than Ba-3, he said. “The 
loan portfolio of this bank is beau- 
tiful." 

Moody's said PNB's assets, al- 
though good, were subject to con- 
siderable volatility. 

Its lending r emain* heavily con- 
centrated on several large expo- 
sures but has become more diversi- 
fied. 

The development bank concen- 
trates on funding industrial and 
agricultural enterprises, in many 
cases indirectly by lending to ac- 
credited financial institutions that 

intern provide loans to the enter- 
prises. 


In Shanghai , 
A Very Special 

Relationship 


Reuters 

SHANGHAI — When the 
president of Morgan Stanley 
Group Inc. blazed into Shang- 
hai amid a wail of police sirens 
and flashing lights several 
weeks ago, a few British noses 
were put out of joint. 

The Brits got even sniffier 
when they found out that John 
Mack and his entourage had 
just zipped down from Beijing 
in a chartered jet after talks 
with Prime Minaker Li Peng. 

“Splashy. Typically Ameri- 
can," one British finan ce execu- 
tive snorted. 

After sparring foe business in 
Hong Kong, where big U.S. se- 
curities houses have lately 
charged in with huge opera- 
tions, British-U-S. rivalry has 
shifted to Shanghai. 

At stake are fat underwriting 
fees for a new batch of 22 Chi- 
nese companies that have been 
picked to issue stock on over- 
seas exchanges this year. 

Longer-term, Shanghai , with 
its booming stock market, is 
eme rgin g as China's financial 
center; billions of dollars will 
be raised here to fund national 
development. 

Securities houses are malting 
an elaborate display of commit- 
meat to the city in hopes it will 
pay off when Beijing hands out 
underwriting contracts. 

Opening an office in Shang- 
hai has become an important 
ritual. Tbe trick is to do it with 
as much hoopla as possible — 
and that’s where the Americans 
are scoring. “They’re much bet- 
ter at tbe PR,” one British fi- 
nancier conceded. 

Merrill Lynch & Co. has been 
trumpeting its arrival as the 
first US bouse in Shanghai by 
running advertisements month 
after month on tbe Asian satel- 
lite network STAR TV. 

Now, three of the world's 
biggest financial houses have 
opened Shang hai offices in al- 
most as many weeks — Morgan 
Stanley, Barings PLC and NAL 
Rothschild & Sons. 

Hotel ballrooms are doing a 
brisk trade in banquets and 
cocktafl parties. Public rela- 
tions firms are hustling journal- 
ists. Stock exchange officials 
complain of exhaustion tram 
receiving all die bigwigs. 


Mr. Mack caused the greatest 
stir. Tbe limousines for bis en- 
tourage practically filled the 
parking lot of the Penman Ho- 
tel Huang Ju, Shanghai’s may- 
or, turned up ai the Morgan 
Stanley bash. 

(Tor Barings’ opening, the 
guest of honor was the chair- 
man of the Shanghai Branch of 
the People's Bank of China, 
Mao Yingliang.) 

^S hanghai h as B long and 
rich history, together with an 
exciting and prosperous future. 
We are proud to be present in 


U.K. and U.S. 
securities firms 
vie in China’s 
financial capital. 


this great city,” Mr. Mack told 
reporters. 

History, though, is a strong 
British suit. 

Sir Evelyn de Rothschild told 
the guests at the N.M. Roth- 
schild opening banquet that his 
f amil y’s links with Shanghai 
dated back more than 150 years 
to the days wben Rothschild 
traded Mexican silver here. 

Peter Baring went one better. 
He claimed a 200-year attach- 
ment to Shanghai for Barings. 
At his news conference, Mr. 
Baring couldn't resist a jab at 
the Yanks. 

He said that in Shanghai, 
“The only difference between 
European and U.S. investment 
banks is that American banks 
have been notable by their ab- 
sence from the trading of shares 
whereas we and other European 
banks have been very active." . 

Not one US securities house 
has taken up a special trading 
seat on the S hang hai market. 

What irks some of the British 
is that they have been plugging 
away at Chinese issues for sev- 
eral years and Morgan Stanley, 
which has yet to do a single 
Chinese class B or class H share 
offering, breezes in and seems 
poised to pluck several of this 
year’s juiciest underwriting 
plums. 


Hong Kong 
Seeks to Cool 
Real Estate 


Compiled bv Our Staff Firm Dispatches 

HONG KONG —.Governor 
Chris Patten on Tuesday promised 
“exceptional measures” to tackle 
Hong Kong's soaring real estate 
prices, which be said threaten tbe 
territory's competitiveness and the 
security of ordinary people. 

Mr. Patten said that one thing he 
intended doing was to ask C hina. 
under the Sino- British agreements 
on the colony, to release further 
land for development. 

The governor said the cost of 
home and office accommodation, 
which has climbed almost uninter- 
rupted since 1991, would be bis top 
priority and the measures would be 
announced by the early aiming . 

“It's an exceptional problem and 
I think it will demand exceptional 
measures," he told reporters after a 
meeting of the Executive Council. 

“I dunk it’s an men secret that 
weH be talking to the Chinese side 
through the usual rfiannds about 
land and the amount of land coming 
on to tbe market," Mr. Patten said 

The Hong Kong government 
needs China's approval if it wants 
to release mote than 50 hectares 
(123 acres) of land each year for 
development Hong Kong will be 
ruled by China after 1997. 

Hong Kong's Real Estate Devel- 
opers Association weighed in on Mr. 
Patten's side in Beijing on Monday, 
calling on Chinese leaders to ap- 
prove the release of mare land, ac- 
cording to local newspaper reports. 

For its part, China has warned 
state-owned companies to stop en- 
gaging in property speculation in 
Hong Kong but refrained from en- 
dorsing plans to release more land. 

Hong Kong's government and 
banks have tried several times since 
1991 to cool property prices, which 
have hit Hong Kong’s middle class- 
es and threatened to force compa- 
nies to move to other Asian dues, 
but always with limited success. 

The government has extended 
some taxes to discourage specula- 
tion, but it has always said its pow- 
er is limited by its tree-market poli- 
cies, which prevent large-scale 
government intervention. 

A 550-square-foot (52-square- 
meter) apartment can cost 23 mil- 
lion Hong Kong dollars ($320,500). 

Half the population lives in subsi- 
dized government bouring. But with 
foreign companies pouring into the 
colony because of the boom in Chi- 
na, prices of many private apart- 
ments to rent or buy have jumped to 
levels only the very rich or people 
with company housing allowances 
can afford (Reuters, Bloomberg) 


Investor’s Asia 





r 




U a* 





Sources: Reuters. AFP 


huctnaiiotial Herald ttifrane 


■jom. 


Very briefly: 


• Petron Cup, the biggest oil refiner in the Philippines, has postponed 
the sale of 20 percent of its shares to the public until June or July because 
of the Manila stock market’s slump, an industry source said. 

• Yizheng Chemical Fiber Co.'s stock, starting trading on a Hong Kong 
market hurt by recent losses, feD bdow its offer price of 138 Hong Kong 
dollars (30.8 U.S. cents) a shiue before dosing at 1425 dollars; Yizheng is 
the first Chinese state enterprise to list overseas this year. 

• Oriental Press Group Ltd. which launched the Eastern Express newspa- 
per in Hong Kong eight weeks ago, is considering entering English- _ ! 
speaking markets elsewhere in the world. 

• Suzhou Machine Tool Electric Appliance Factory is sating op a venture 
with Siemens AG lo make low-voltage electridty distribution equipment 
in China; Siemens win hold a majority stake in the 100 million Deutsche 
mark ($60 million) venture, Siemens Electrical Apparatus Ltd. 

• Phffip Morris Cos. will set up a 1 82 million ringgit ($68 million) tobacco 
processing plant in Malaysia’s southwestern state of Negeri Sembflan. 

AFP, Reuters, AFX 


Bullish Signals lor Japan 


Couqrikd by Our Staff From Dispatches 

TOKYO — Japan’s leading in- 
dex of economic indicators rose to 
60 points in January, up from 38.5 
in December and above the barrier 
of 50 points for the first time in 
nine months, the Economic Plan- 
ning Agency said Tuesday. 

A reading above 50 points sig- 
nals an expanding economy. 

Meanwhile, an index showing 
current economic conditions rose 
to 85 points in January, up sharply 
from 22.7 in December and above 


the 50-point level for the first time 
in four months. 

But two other indicators were 
bearish. The government an- 
nounced that Japan's seasonally 
adjusted unemployment rate stood 
at 2.9 percent in February, up 0.2 
percentage point from January and 
the highest jobless rate recorded 
since June 1987. 

The government also said that 
sales by major Japanese retailers in 
February had fallen 2.8 percent 
from a year ago, to 1.45 trifficra yen 
($14 billion). ( Bloomberg, AST) 


NYSE 

Tuesday's Closing 

- Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


(Continued) 




TV; Dropped by STAR, the BBC Gets an Imitation From Wharf Coble 


Continued from Page 9 

ambitious project investing $800 
nriOioQ to bund a cable network 
from scratch across Hong Kong. 

“We have had discussions with 
Wharf and other companies in the 
northern beam area, but it’s too 
eariy to say how they will be re- 
solved,” a BBC spokesman, Phil 
Johnstone, said in London. 

“We have said we want to come 
back as soon as possible. We bave a 
number of possibilities,” Mr. John- 
stone said. 

STAR TV, continuing a trend by 
international broadcasters to tailor 
their product to individiial markets, 
announced Tuesday its plans to in- 
vest in 50 new Chinese language 
movies over the next three years. 

Media Asia Films, beaded by 
two leading film producers, Ma 
Fung- Kwok and Wellington Fung, 
will supply STAR TV with films to 


augment a large Chinese-1 
programming library it pc 
last year. They will be broadcast on 
the subscription channel which will 
replace the BBC following their 
theatrical and home-video release. 

“Last week we announced that 
STAR TV must change. That it 
must provide locally produced, lo- 
cal-language programming,” said 
STAR TV’s chief executive Gary 
Davey. "We will continue to under- 
take similar production output 
deals with other local independent 
production companies in Hong 
Kong and the region.” 

STAR TV, controlled by Mr. 
Murdoch’s News Corp., said last 
week that it would replace the BBC 
with a Chinese-language movie 
channel in its East Asian coverage 
area. 

Although STAR TV said it was a 
commercial, not a political deci- 
sion, Mr. Murdoch has since been 


quoted as saying that the BBC had 
caused him “lots of headac he s" 
with Beijing and other Asian gov- 
ernments. 

Wharf Cable belongs to Wharf 
(Holdings) LuL, a Hong Kong con- 
glomerate whose controlling family 
— the heirs of the shipping tycoon 
Sir Y. JL Pao — has good relations 
with Beijing. 

Wharf Cable was launched last 
October. It has 44,000 subscribers 
and is aiming for 250,000 by year- 
end. —KEVIN MURPHY 

■ BBC Flans Arabic Service 

Tbe BBCs World Service Televi- 
sion will launch an Arabiolan- 
guage news service this year, broad- 
casting to tbe Middle East and 
North Africa, Reuters reported 
from London; 

World Service Television said 
that after six months of talks it had 
signed a 10-year supply contract 


*Tol 


LYONNAIS; 

Banker Punished 

Continued from Page 9 

francs playing poker with the com- 
plicity of tbe government, and be 
lost,” the daily Le Monde wrote in 
an editorial ova- the weekend. 

As recently as last Friday. Mr. 
Haberer, who is still a board mem- 
ber at Crfcdit Lyonnais, had refused 
to comment on the bank. 

The former chairman acknowl- 
edged that “errors were commit- 
ted" and that internal controls were 
imperfect. But be said that he re- 
fused to be a “sacrificial victim." 

Mr. Haberer, who built Credit 
Lyonnais into Europe's biggest 
bank in terms of assets with tbe 
slogan “The power to say ‘Yes’ ”, 
complained that he had been 
blamed for risky loans made even 
before be became head of the bank? 

During his tenure, the bank 
backed the Italian financier Gian- 
carlO Parrel ti in his takeover of 
Metro-Goldwyn- Mayer Inc. and 
then had to take possession of the 
Hollywood film studio when Mr. 
Parretti defaulted. It also suffered 
losses from commitments to Sasea 
SA, a Swiss holding company con- 
trolled by Mr. Parretti's associate. 
Florio Fiorini, and Scotti Fman- 
ziaria, a Milan-based real estate 
company controlled by Sasea. 

Sasea collapsed in 1992, and in 
February a Swiss judge investigat- 
ing the case charged Mr. Haberer 
and Francois GiUe, the Crfcdit Ly- 
onnais managing director, with 
' in tiie bankruptcy, 
e bank also suffered losses in 
tiw dottapse of tbe real estate empire 
Olympia & York Developments 
Ltd. and the media conglomerate 
run by the late Robert Maxwdl. . 

An economist at France's presti- 
gious School of Political Science 
said Mr. Haberer’s defense was 
only partially valid, suggesting that 
the executive had struck a Faustian 
pact with the government in order 
to pursue his expansion strategy. 


Abu Dhabi • Kuala Lumpur • Dubai # Kuwait • Bangkok 


Singapore • Kathmandu 1 • Calcutta • Hong Kong • Athens 



n. •.. Bahrain • Bombay ® Doha 


furt • Rangoon ® Riyadh © Rome 


scat • Amsterdam • Abu Dhabi 


a Lumpur • Dubai © Kuwait • Bangkok 9 Singapore 


Kathmandu • : Calcutta : • Hong Kong 9 Athens 9 Delhi! 


Jeddah •#;. London- ©' Bahrain Bombay •.Doha •-.■Paris 


New York • Frankfurt • Range 


Yes! 


You can now add ihe Big Apple 
to the list of more than thirty destinations 
already served by Biman Bangladesh 
Airlines. With direct flights every Saturday 
from Dhaka, Delhi, Dubai and Amsterdam, 
Biman will take you where you want to go. 






anF*UFr*=i 

Biman Bangladesh aoumes 


with a Middle Eastern-backed 
3, Orbit Communications, 
forid Service Television did not 
say how much the deal was worth, 
but industry estimates are around 
£180 million ($270 million). 

Christopher Irwin, chief execu- 
tive of world Service Television, 
said broadcast facilities in London 
and 220 jobs would be created as a 
result of the contract. 

Orbit, a private company owned 
by a consortium of Middle Eastern 
and other international businesses, 
will include the World Service Tele- 
vision programs as part of a pay- 
TV multi-channel package broad- 
cast over the Arabsat 1 satellite. 

World Service Television, added 
that the new arrangement with 
STAR TV, under winch the BBC 
will continue to be broadcast to the 
Indian subcontinent, had ended a 
legal skirmish over the Arabic ser- 
vice. 


tncluc 

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I Page 14 


NASDAQ 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 


Uwtontti 
HienLM stock 


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n Month 
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^This list compiled by the AP, consists of the 1.C 


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[This list compiled by the AP, consists of the 1,000 
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Z Ur& 

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8% BW -to 
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Z 2519507 

z 3s 3 5& 

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18% IBto 1BW — to 
29 27% 27%— lto 

20% JO 20 —to 
16% 16>A 16% —to 
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19% 19 19V, -to 

Vto 9to 9to —% 
42 to 41V, 41 to —to 
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13W - 

47% 45% 45 to —2 
39 26 26V:— 7% 

29 ’A 37". 37-.— 2 
7% 4% 6to— ir» 

5'A 5 1 4 S’.. _ 

7W 7W r. 

86% S3%M>— ?A 

28 27** 2£i —to 
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XV* 20?. 79 —1% 

29% 28 X —lto 
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26% 26 26% —to 

X Z7 27% -to 
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36 35% 35% —to 

34 33% 33% —to 

24% 23 w mu — W 

20 IS 19V* > 

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29 "r 28% 28T* -to 


9»« ittoROmsoy 
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Z > 958 Mb 8% 9 —V* 

Z — 189 3 7> 7to — 'A 

„ _ 1917 *'A 5W SW —to 

_ 73 4849 14W M 14 — Vb 
_ 271 427 19% 19 19 -fa 


a Tscnmtx - 27 X 

ST'.iXtoToCUA 1 00 O 14 13 402 

13 % 6% Telco _ _ 924 

33V* J7!iTe)OlA _ >31573 

23V* 13 TMedta - 16 214 

61%12WTeMt»s > 39 1835 

16to 6%TebaMi JJ1 .1 31 W 

17% 7WTenour __ > 26 329 

‘ lavrTevas 40e J 25 25aa 

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12 TodayM • _ 27 2713 

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6%Toppf, JB 19 13 1098 

jb, 1 if m 

,JB "3fJ8 


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sT 

US JJSJlSrJt 

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H S3 Vi ErW — 
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17% 17 17 — 


26to 15V* Redman >271 427 19% 19 19 — W 

7% x.toRMOIC > _ 7M to “Vh — Vj| 

2Tto 6toRegeam — > 255 TlS 4W> 7V» > 

R\%llSSa!t Z Z 4157 3to 3to ,3to — V» 


16% 9toRepBcp J2 2J 8 441 13% 12% 12% —'a 

25 B pSSjtoI _ 35 2316 12% 11V. lZto + lto 

Mto Sli^Si Z _ 802 9W 9V* 9% _ 

96V*57toReulHd lAe M > 4681 90W BB% 88W— IW 

22 7toRe*SwiS _ 19 787 18% 17W 17W — Vb 

IP’. 6-.*rSni Z _ 1478 l8% lOW 10% —'A 

19'-.!07.RjoHM > 36 2370 16 19V 15W -Vb 

7<r-i5ItoRbadSV (40 ZO 23 349? 79to 46W 40W— IW 

4Z%17WHbJPfe _ 63 603 30V* 28% 28W— 1 

21totl%R0CftCS _ _ > 953 17% Iff A Mto —to 

31W25 RchCSpf 1JS 5-8 - 32 31 W 30W XW— 1 

Xto^OtoRocCand _ _ 60S 25% 25 25 —to 

48% 36% RsvftFn 1J0 17 I 9 45 44% 44% — % 

39 -.5 , -.Rstws. .12 A 21 2S1 2BW 26W MW— 4% 

20’-* IT .RcssStr 315 e J 14 1011 16% 15W 15W _ 

15% dviRassSy > _ 9W 6W 5% 6 —to 

21V, 15 Rouse A8 3A _ 567 19 18V* 19 +W 

*9---49^iRoD5eirf 125 6.1 — 1053 53. 55 ♦% 

9to ffbftV'rf _ 15 190 8W 8 B _ 

2CW:i%S31nCS > 15 4109 12W 12 12 — % 

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20 T -* 13V,SR=ed 32C I J 14 29 17% 17V* 17% +% 

12W 5WSHLSV > _ WO 7% 6% Ok— W 

31 73 SLMs - 27 32BO 14 dIC 12 —1% 

66W51Tfas5eco JJO 3A B 1634 54 53W BW —to 

33'.: 9'ASttvisl _ 33 587 24% 23% 2% > 


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48W1BW3DOCO 
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9% SWTokOsMd 
11% 6%T0PP£ 
38% IfaTmM 

1 

22 8% Tseng 

10W dwTbbscp 

7Vb i'AUNR 
22% ? to US Lotto 


.158 1J 17 X6 


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117. 6 UGamg _ _ KBO 

36'A 21 % UtdtrtHM „ _ 161 

25% TWUtRffitca > 90 X 


JK A 16 5063 
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J00 3J .14 309 
_ 36 875 


22V, 21 to 21% —H 

^ ms « 

27% 27 . 27% — K 

17 15W 15W -%■ 

4 3to 4 . „ 

7W 7 7% > 

Bto 8% 8% —to 
21 w raw 20to —to 
34W 3* 34% -% 

!»5 

9W 9W 9W— W 
5% Sto 5% > 


I2W BVVIntgpti 
57W zi v, imgHR 


9% dtolntrfeot 
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20% 14 Mtimcm 
28% 4%mrram 
llto 6%ln)mu 
15V, dtoimaretv 


15V, JJAimerstw 
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> 26 72 

> _ TOO 

z z”S3 
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14'/, 14% —V* 
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iD'-i law _ 
11% llto —Vi 
16V, 16% _ 

37to 37W —'A 
26 36 — W 

17% 17W -% 
20W 21 
6W 6W —W 
40% 41 to — % 
u% 14% — to 
14to 14% - % 
28% 2P'-i - Vk 
13% 13W —V* 
26% 27V. - % 
67 67% — 1 

16% 17% — % 
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TVs 8 > 

Mb 9W _ 

53% 53to _ 


J3'A 26% MAC I 


»%io%NaB(ix 

25 MWNFOnsti 
34% 26% NS BCD 
IB lOWNtCetr 
21V, disNatVsns 
38 38 NIWtiLf 
17% 6%NIWda 
17% 5%NatWndr 
MV* B NatrSts 
X%11%NauNcaS 
29% 17% NcOmr 

26 147’.NC*snT 


7% 7% — % 
II. 12 % -% 


20toll JSJSn 
26% 22% JSB Fin 
18 9WJeanPtll 
17% 73% JetfS vb 
law lov.JenfCv 
30’b 16 JafimtnA 
XW 10 Jane 1 A 


21 iS'AJunoLt 
23% 4 JuslTavs 
25% 11 W Justins 
26% IB’AK Swiss 
43W11 Kl_A_ 
X% 17%Kaydons 


Z 19 317 

I 20 502 

^ “ a s 

- 55 24 

Z 4i ns 

.10 3 M 451 

J*4 1J 18 342 

% 'i IS d 

AO 1.6 15 ™ 


II 12 % -% 
9% 9to > 
23 23 Vi— 1% 

i£to 17 -to 
10% 11% — W 

13% 13% — % 
IT.* 12% —V* 
37V. 37V. —Vi 
27% 27W —to 
18 18 — to 

17 Vi T7V* —Vi 
22% 22% —to 


iiVi iiw —% 
16% 16% —V* 

fifcjr-? 

14 14% _ 

12% 1 3 Va _ 
18% 18% — % 
6'.. 6% _ 
jaw 13% — w 
23% 23% —to 
34 35W*lVh 
23 V* 24W ♦ 'A 


26 147.'. NetsrtT .16 
fflto 72toNetfrtBTW 
47 23 Netmmo 
23H B NtwkC 
10% 6%NtwkSV 
2?to MWNeutfg 27 
21 9%Nwlmco 
73%27V,N«4Mks 
35to 1 7% N WkiBk 35t 

54% 22 NextelCm 
IIW 5%NMeOr 
60% X NWDrgf 2.25 
SV„ 2 NolsecfT 
36% IB Norond 

43 XWMantsn J56 

44 V, 25 V* Nordst M 

50% 37 NorTrst XI 

38WXWNwNG 1-76 
34 17 NOVUfls 

45 14WNOVIIK 
23 14%NuKate A 
i6toiO'ANutrmax 

19to 6 OPTl 

35'A [8'A0Re9yAu 
X 19 Octal 
19W 12 OffcLoo 
73 57toOrt^a 2.92 

3?%29v*£WdKent 1.14 
29 7 oficom 

14% 49,OmegaEn 
dlWTMrtOnbgs U» 
26% 9 OnePrc 
1BW BWOptDDl 
37WlS%Oroae* 

XV, 9wOrb5d 
17W11 arensHw 


2.9 _ 1207 

> X 495 

— JM 961 
_ 13 J 

> 38 448 

- 22 71 

_ 17 621 
A 36 1258 
_ 29 308 
_ 58 4201 

> 26 3406 

> 111 541 

U 19 62 

- 8 SOB 

> 5217962 

' 3 14 -31 

> _ SI 86 

> 2110923 

^ I 97W 

.0 28 ^ 
J 24 4321 
2.1 14 256 
SJ 13 34 

- >31942 
_ 32 3083 

> Z3 526 

_ 28 74 

> 20 784 

- 28 23 

_ X 1582 

- 14 299 

44 13 81 

17 10 639 

_ _ 209 

> _ 1532 
33 8 638 

> 18 554 

> 28 273 

> X17256 
_ X 1959 

> 8 587 


Z6% 24% 26to > 
I6W ISVi If A > 

4% —V, 
40 —1 
ISto -Vfa 
8% —to 
21 to — 'fa 

2»b > 

X > 


1B% > 

7W > 

%-c 

39W — % 
6to — % 

x% -% 

-V, 
33V* > 

■57% — 

40%-lW 
42% > 

34 —Us 
19'A —% 
351* —% 
21 Vb— 1 


Mb 6%Rvarf= _ IS 190 SW 8 B _ 

2CW:itoS31nCS > 15 4109 tzw 12 12 — % 

22 to Mtosasr* _ 15 9247 77to I5W I AW —to 

2»to 13V,SR=ed 33C IJ 14 79 17% 17V* 17% +W 

12W 5WSHLSV > _ 960 7% 6% Ofa— W 

31 73 SLMS - 27 3280 14 dll 12 —lto 

66%SlTfas5«D JJO 3A B 1634 54 53W 53 ’A —to 

33 . : 9'ASttylsT _ 33 587 24% 23% 2% > 

16 l * 12W5tFroncn _ _ 43 15V* 14% 14% — % 

32% 25 SlSshJs AO IJ 12 2X9 27W 26W 36W — % 

IS KFASwAary .16 1.7 33 64 12% 12W 12% rto 

23% T3”.StFcVltBS JO IJ 9 127 19% 18% 18% -W 

22V* 1 DV, SandReg JO U II 119 13% 13 13 _ 

31% 10 Sanmina > 16 I5S0 19. 10% ISto —Ms 

13 dWSSdCrz _ 15 33 6V* 5% 6 — % 

28V. M Sapiens _ X 204 13 I2W I2H —to 

22 IdtoSavoy > > 756 IS 14% 15 +W 

20% 12 ScndBdc > _ 230 26W XU XU —to 

54V* 33V* ScttoiCp _ 17 220 39V* 38W 39 TV, 

XV* 14WScnuler _ 18 327 28W Z7W, 27% — % 

35Vi 26% Schtmn 36 1.1 24 433 32% 37 to 31% —to 

27% lltoStidone > _ 443 I7W 17% 17W +W 

36 IffASdGme „ 24 829 23to 22V* 23 ♦% 

68 32 Sctmad. > 9 4032 33% 32W 32'A — 1 

13% SWSclasNov _ > 1093 8% 7to Tto +W 

42%2T%Scitex 52 2.1 12 1268 25W 25U 25V* —Vs 
19% 6%ScmBdS > 13 44X 13% 11 llto— 1% 

HltolSV. Scans _ 20 671 19to I9W I9W — Vb 

28 ISViSeacar > _ 21% > 

28V* la'ASeagata _ 1112254 25 23% 23to— 1 


25% TtoUtRecad > 90 X 

2 »a USBcOR JB 3A 10 2771 

14 SWUSFbd _ 8 123 

68V*36WU5HHtl X IJ 23 9517 

46 Ifl'AUSRabt _ 23 3244 

59W49%USTrtt 2JJ0 3U1 12 173 

I9W 9toUMWsl> > 19 673 

46WX LlnOrtn 1^1 XS 22 283 

X mUflwBc - 9 1050 

11% 6%UtC*lMd* >13-330 

18% 6% VLSI > x 4224 

23W1L VaTTcch _ _ 574 


10% ,9W 10% -% 
9to 9to 9to— to 

J iSx M 4>« 

'Jto’Sfzit 

12 lifa ii% > 

J3W 13 13 

5W 5W 5W > 
27W 26to 26to —% 

3SW 35 35 > 

lOto Ifflto IOW > 
Xto 25% 25% •— ! £ 
9% 9 -9% > 

66 - 6a <S3to— Mb 

36% xwaevk-ito 

53% S2V5 53 > 

18% 18% 1BW +w 

40% 39% 39% •• 


7% d 7W 7% — Vs 
fto. 7W 7% +W 
14% 14% 14% > 

15V* 14% 14% — % 
36% XW XW 
28% 27 W 27% —1 
25W XU 24% —% 
23% 22W VV. — Vb 
19V* 18% 19 +to 
27% 26W 27V* —to 
14U 151* 159* —J* 
19V* 18 IBto— 1 
2AW 25W25W— IW 
49% 47V* 47W — 2V* 
7% *%«%-% 

12% 12% !2Vb ' _ 
18% 17% IB -to 
5% 4ft SW -VS 


39W 2Sft VotyBc S .96 2A 16 144 

X Z1 voraa > _ 718 

29 IXtVirtais AO I A 11 364 

46 19toVentritx 


46 IBtoVadrlhc 
X 1* Vwtfne 
20 'A 13 Vicar 


S 


12% 6%vistonSd 
23W17WVltatSon 
21% 9 vmanc 
10% 3%vtei 


- 21 ”89 

- 39 IDO 
> 71 ®7 
_ 20 MM1 
_ 33 1028 

- 39 

Z 13 ^2 

= ? if§ 


35Vi 26% Schtmn 
27% 17% Scjaooo 
36 I6toSciGme 
68 32 Sdmad. 
13ft fflfaS ctosNov 
42'ifa2TftScitW 


9W dVbWCTQm > 39 1620 

32 XWWUTFd X IJl 22 M 

37 23%Wf*xo AO 1A 30 25 

13% 5%wa8clrt > X 741 


w-x-v-z 

> X 1630 


19% aVfaScmBds 
20W1SW ScaRS 
28 ia«t Seaar 
23>* 13% Seagate 


13W 5%Wa8cinl 

m iJWWiTHData ■ > 45 3ZM 

2AW30WWFSL Kb 4.1 9 5211 

28WT8WWMSBS M 3-2 7 2694 


124%99'AWMSBpfDi _ , 

38% 13% WatsnPh _ 21 517 

29 IsftWattsMS 32 9 20 217 

X 7IWWausPs 3A A IV 137 

14% SftWMMt ■ . > > 932 

B7%X%Wemt& > 55 8124 

33% 18% Werners .12 A 32 782 

33 22'ftWstOne* J2 £6 11 197 
24WlDWWSta*3 > 45 3430 

20Jb 12’AWbtnPb - > 7X 

MtolBWWKtHWs JO - - 

25UlS%WhB=dC _ 31 685 

59%35%WBkartS X 2.1 23 2505 
Xto TftWfTISons _ 76 9ZS8 

31 Z&WamTrs 1X0 4J1 11 658 
13% 4toWim*7lvr >153 13T 

76% X WlscCT > 33 82 

2 9<ss ISUWmdTwre > 45 1640 

n MtowkWcp > 35 a 

21W UfaWonho s M IX 24 1449 
7% JfaXOWA > _ 435 

2S%I7%XR7» .16 9 30 2 05 


10% 0 Eeprocr > . _ 1442 TVs 7% 7% — % 

23V* MViSeaurt _ > 1156 1314 I2H 17ft — W 

32W11 SvFnQuOd 6 24 24 24 -ft 


6JW 6J7 _ 10 

_ 21 517 

32 9 20 217 


K'fa BWSftomon 


29tol7%ShrMed B4 11 M «S 


Ml® 9W 10 


19'A 10ft StioeCari 
mu 13 ShakxHS 


7VA 27% _ 


ir?, 7 Shorwd 
34W misnawba 


33 'A 9%SernOn 
>2to dftSterSm 

s^imssa 

38W 13WSkyWbtb 
M i2%SmthF 

SZ.ffiiSSS?'* 

34% 12%SoniRlO 
23U 8'ASJtetC 
14 ft 5%SftwPb 
30M, 13ftSoftSFc 
IVA fiWSoRwx 


ff-^s 

#Et 

10ft —ft 
29Tb— 1 
22% —2 
16W ‘ft 
31% — 1 
23% —A 
W —1 


_ 72 106 13 13V* 13V* —ft 

_ 25 314 23% 22 27% > 

_ 38 170 ISft 15% 15% _ 

>16 71 13% UW 13ft tW 

„ _ 9J2 21 19W »W — W 

_ > I0S4 8% 7* Ufa „ 

> _ 1200 12W. 11% UW —V* 
J3 A X 907 53V* 52V* S3 -<A 

> 33 1713 11% 10ft 11% — W 


_ _ 1764 13 W MW Jlft-JV* 
JA 2A 28 214 22W 31% 21% — % 

05 .1 X 529 37% 36% U% —ft 

> 31 699 22 ft 22 12 — % 

_ 4213402 24% 22% 23V. +W 

_ 37 74Z 23%- 23 23 — % 


- > - > 40 311 23ft 22% 22% „ 

IU 8'ASJtetC > 17 99 12ft 12U 12V* — % 

S 5%S«wPb _ > 3*0 7% 7% 7% —to 

IJftSoftSK _ 8 72 14% 13ft I4to +% 

W fiftSanmc _ 54 5703 10ft 9ft 9ft — w- 

■ 4WSamatjm > _ 141 .7% 7% 7W —ft 

Wt?«.Sorejc/s 54 13 18 ra Mto wlfaj! 
'A 8WSOBBC.. _ B 190 9 dSft.SW— % 


59W29ftX®HX 
Xto 7 'A Xircom 
23 ITWXytogic 


« 32 54» 

> 33 3654 

> 20 253 


J'AldWStfmEnH > _ 17 

2ftirASoulrsts *68 3J 10 551 18ft l»W IM* — to 
3ft B'ASowBcps .10 .9 13 324 Jtft 1JV, 11% — % 


30 IStoXypfis _ 73 742 

30 to l61bYe00wO .94 3.4 39 2*42 
34%I6WYaut*er - 6 -389 

■ioft 23% Zebra > 25 M 

28ft BftZenLabS > 21 763 

40W21%ZDog > 24 1024 

49 36 ZijnScp 1.12 U 1 II 
43W14%ZoMAed > 44 X 

17 TWZBOtnTl > 17 362 


fiW 6W 6W -ft 
31V* 30% 30ft —ft 
X 29V. 29ft -W 
lift llto llto —to 
Xto 43 - 44% —% 
21ft 21% 21% —V* 
28 19% 19ft - % 

99% 99% 99% —to 
16% 15% 15%— IV* 
MU 25 25 —IV* 

Xto 29ft -30% -ft 
7ft 7ft 7»— to 
74V* 71% 72 —1% 
Xto XW 9 —1% 
XW 27ft 27ft _ 
21 W 20% 71 ’A —5 
15ft Uft 15W +W 

19% 18% 79 — W 

47% 45to 46 —to 
35 31% 34 > 

25W 24% 35 -to 
Aft 6% 6% —to 
74% 73 73 to— lto 

17 16 Itfto —to 

18% .10% IM* > 

ray* ]?% i9% —to 

4ft d 3% 4 ■ 

2 m 21%' 21ft — % 
53% 49V* 49ft — 3to 
23 211* 21%— % 

Uft 18% 18to —ft 
17% 17 17 —to 

26% -36% 24ft —ft 
19'A 18 1BW— IV* 
Xto 36%3BV*-1% 
Uft 17% 18 —to 
34V* XW 33% —to 
XW - 38% Xft -Vb 
31% 30% 31% -W 
11 % 10 % 11 — % 


AMEX 


12 Month 
Ugn Low Stack 


Di« Ykj PE 100s Ugh Lew Latest OTge 


12 Month 
Kwh Lon Stock 


Wv YW PE mb Ugh LawLohrtOi'gg 


12 Month 
ttstl Low Stack 


Div VIO PE 100s 


| K Month 

i Low Laics! ClYoe [ tfigh Low Bode 


Sis W Monti __ Ss ■ 

Dte YW PE 100s Ugh LowLKestOTge hfintiLow Stock Div Yld P6 Iins fttfi LawUteaoYge: 


Tuesday's 3 p.m. 

Tables include the nationwide prices up to 
the closing on Wall Street and do not reflect 
late trades elsewhere. Via The Associated Press 


24U 1 8ft Combo: JO 
13to loftCopRfyl 1J» 
12ft 9% CodRD n 1JB . 
15 11 CapRQn \M 1 
14% 5ft Carmel 
14% 8%Carlnohi 
W VuCospen 

JSiPSaBK 1 4. . 

X »WCasFd 1-60 a , 
12ft 6%CatoaJ 
17. BViCavaWs X8 
20’-, 17WCnJrPrn .47e 


i5 A '1 

IS M Z 

> 5 


48 24 21 

IjAOo 67 _ 


5 Xft 

iz raw 
14 'li* 

14 12ft 
X 9ft 
124 12 'A 

1X 4 Sb 


11 % 11 % —ft 
12% 12ft —ft 
9% ?W -ft 
11 % 11 % — % 
to to _ 
4% 4% —%, 
19% 19% — % 
73% 23% —ft 


Aft 4%FrkREn JO 93 >' X 
5% 3 FrkSeln AO I0X — « 

5ft 3WFrkSuDl» _ > 1« 


2 WFrkSpwt _ > 77 

9ft4Jto,Fr«sentus _ 32 9 

4W 2ftFrtectn ,16b 3J B 20 

21ftl2%FriSCbS Mb IX 17 7 


5% 5% 5ft * ft 

4ft 4 4 _ 

4ft 4ft 4ft —W 
ft % ft > 
7 6W 6ft —ft 


1 V5MSR _ _ 

15ft lZftMOcNSC A* 53 


y, % <t — v« 
13'A 12ft 12'* —ft 

“1? “IS “to . ,-r 


■ 4 pratHti _ > ra 5 4ft 4% — w 

.15’SProlLm 40 IS li . S7 . 17ft 17W 17'A ♦% 


13% 1Mb -VS. 


2ft I iwantcn _ 

15ftl3ftMassHEn X3Q6X 


12 Month Ss 

togh Low Stock Dw Yk) F6 10% High LovtLdeslOi'g 


5ft JftCFCdoo 
49ft 42%CenM pr 
17% UftCentSg 
raft 6%ctvpn 
5% 3toOlDewA 
5% JPftCMftvB 
Xft 13 Chp&l 
X I2ftOvtMed 
ldto JWdrtPvyr 

]M413toCheshrB 


41 U - 
_. 32 
- 16 


J3914J > 
2.70e 41 _ 
> 48 


_ 8 

jo !i ft 
- 19 

« £ ? 


8V, + % 
i 34V, —ft 
10ft 

22ft — to 
3ft —ft 

Jto > 
2ft _. 

f, —to 

3ft T ft 
14ft —ft 
1 —ft 

6ft— lto 
3ft - Vn 

ra/„ — vu 


ssi&sggr 

22 to 13% C ' - 


32to 13% Chief 
Xto25WQitlntpf 


7W 2-ACH.tes 
15% dtoGrcoPti 
73 4'Acnadels 
9 6toCtZp5* 
«ftl6«.aocrCS 
6ft wennks s 

B'A 4S’,QiceJD 

4* r^KS& 

22% 9% conus 


> 17 460 12 lift lift — W 

X8 J 15 42 15ft- 14ft 14ft — % 

-47 p 13 > 172 It 71 Wto OTft —ft 

XI 3 > 101 ift 5% 5ft .. 

150 8.1 _. zlX 45. 43 43, —to 

1 JOe 9X > X 16% 16V4 Id 1 * —to 

J5, ”*i?Bxf SC 5K r 

> 31 55 3"/i* 3Vu T to, _ 

> 17 209 27’A 26 W 26% — W 

> > 698 26V* 23 25ft— 1% 

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ADVERTISEMENT 

INTERNATIONAL FUNDS 


Page 15 


March 29, 1994 


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1 tf CS UK Fund A 1 

d CS UK Fund B c 

tf CS France FendA- FF 

1 tf CS Fr ance F und B FF 

tf CSlIatyFundA— — — — — Lit 

tf CS Italy Fund B Ut 

rf CS Netherlands Fd A FL 

C CS NcfiKriaafc Fd B FL 

tf CS FF Bond A FF 

tf CS FF Bond B FF 

tf CSCOPIMSFR2000 SF 

tf CSCOpttoiDMSM DM 

rf CS Capital DM 1797 DM 

tf C3 Capital Era 2000 — Fm 

tf CSCaptta4FF2000 FF 

tf CS Jam Megatrend SFR-SF 
tf CS Jam Megatrend Yon _Y 
tf CSPorlf incSFRA/B— SF 

a CSPortt BaISFR SF 

d CSPorlf Growth 5FR SF 

tf CSPorlf Inc DM A/B DM 

tf CSPorlf Bal DM DM 

d CSPorlf Growth DM —DM 

tf CS Fortune US! A/B S 

d CS Portl Bat US* * 

tf CS Portl Growth US* * 

tf CS Eq Fd Emera Mkts S 

tf CS Ea Ftf Small dm USA-8 

tf CS Eq Fd Small Eur. DM 

d CS EqFdLaf Amorlaj S 

CURS ITOR FUND 

d CurelW East Aston Eq—_J 778* 

d CureHorGRXGwthSub-Ftf-S «« 

DARIER HEKTSCH GROUP 
T*J 41-22 701*8 37 

tf DH Molar Markets JFVnd— SF W«M 

d Hontscb Treraonr Fd ~fF 

tf Samurai Portfolio— —SF 323J0 

DISCOUNT BANK GROUP 

w MuMcurr. Bond SF 

•rDoival Bond * 

w Euravot Eautty- — -Ea» IS’S 

iv N. America Equity 8 M27» 

er Podflc Equity S 1ML17 

BIT INVESTMENT FFM 

tf Concentre t — — 2JJ 55 

d Inn Ren tenl o nd + DM 7220 

DUBIN B 5WIECA ASSETMANAOEMENT 
Tel : 1809) 7C 1400 Far : B 09) M5 Mffl 
b HWibrkloe Copltai Cor^-f 1^-10 

mOverkx*PertoiTnanceFd-S 2m» 

m Poctflc RIM Qp Fd— — — — S 11130 E 

EBC FUND MANAGERS UerSjryl LTD 
IGSeoleSL St KeUer; 0534-34331 
EBCTRADED CURRENCY FUND LTD 
tf r™* 1 * 7 38 5 4 

ff — IS! 41 
INTERNATIONAL INCOME FUND 

tf Long Tlt**~ * 325M8 

a Law Term -DMK____DM 10*5740 

ERMITAOE LUX [352-4*338) 
w ErmJtuge Seiz Fund— ■ -J Mg 

wErmmwe Aslan Hedge ““ 

wErmttage Euro Hedge M -DM lin 

iv Ermfloae Crosby AMoFtf-S 1181 

er ermttnge Amer HdnFd— 8 «5 

trEffliHmEirnrmBFcL—S 1SS6 

BUROPAHiNOSLmrreo 

tf American Eautty Fwd S TOM 

tf American Option Fund J 2Mg 

w Al lan Equ ity Fd * 

w Eorooean Erajtv Fd — .--- 8 l»« 

EVEREST CAPITAL (Mil 272 IMS 
m Everest Capitol (ntt Ltd— — S 13*83 

FIDELITY 1WTL INV. SERVICES (LW) 

tf Dbanrarv Rind — J J}-g 

tf Far East Fund— 1 JM# 

tf FUL Amer. Assets * *2 

tf Fid. Amer. Values IV S 1WI 2§ 

d Frontier Fund-- s »» 

rf Global ind F un d J 1*8* 

ff Global Setecttao Fund * 2U5 

tf Irtfernaltoral Fund 5 *8* 

i iSf \ 

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tf Special Growth Fund % 

tf world Fund * 


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FINMANAOSMCHT 5A Lll f eiiu tiLWawni 
w Delta Premium Cere— I 1177JU 

FOKUS BANK A8. 472 421 5SS 
w Scontonds Inti Growth Fd_l 1,17 

FUND MARKETING GROUP (BID) 

PJXBnc 2001, HomOtan, Bermuda 

mFMG Global KB Feb) s 1439 

njFMGtLAmnvrai Feb)— I llji 

mFMG Europe [21 Feb) * 1L3D 

mFMG EMOMKT 128 Feb)_8 1381 

fflFMGO (21 F«b) 5 108? 

FX CONCEPTS (BERMUDA) LTD 

ie Conceals Forex Fund 3 1IUB 

GAU CURRENCY FUNDS 

w Go la Hedge II — S 13U* 

IV Goda Hedge III 5 148* 

■rGata Swiss Franc Fd— SF 5181 

w GAIA Fx _» 11485 

mGcriaGua ran i e wtCt. 1 s I486 

m Gala Guaranteed CL 1 1 5 IMS 

GARTMORE INDOSUEZ FUNDS 2M2/74 
Tel: (352) 4* 54 24 470 
Foot: 1352) 4* 54 23 
BOND PORTFOLIOS 

tf DEM Bond Dto583 DM M7 

tf Diverbond D Is 281 SF 2.1* 

0 DbUor Band XMtSt t 247 

tf European Bd — DIs 1 70 ■■.era 1J1 

tf Frandi Franc DIs10l37 FF 1128 

tf Global Band ras2.I*_8 2X5 

EQUITY PORTFOLIOS 

tf ASEAN . . .9 784 

rf Asto Poctflc, _% 4J3 

tf CentbNnial Europe Era 147 

d Sivotoplng Markets — __S <57 


tf France -FF 1187 

tf Ocnmxn r ni« uj 

tf Japan — Y 27180 

tf North America S 287 

tf Swtwrewt «E 380 

rf united Kktgdom t 184 

RESERVE FUNDS 

tf Donor Dts2J>8_ S iSl 

tf French Franc FF 1283 

tf YOI Reserve Y 28*4 

BEFINOR FUNDS 

London : 871-4974171. Geneva : 41-22355538 
w East Investmait Fund— S 74788 

w Scottish World Fund S 45U9S2 

e> Stale St Amerfcen s 34887 

OGNESGE FUND Ltd 

wlM Genesee Eagle I 13780 

w (B) Genesee Short 2 MJ2 

w(C) Genesee Opportunity -8 153.13 

er (F) Genesee NonCaoIlV— 8 12484 

GEO LOCOS 

aril S tratum B urn t B Ecu W5BJS 

wll Poctflc Bond B SF 143484 

BLOBAi. ASSET MANAGEMENT 
OFFSHORE FUNDS 
11 ABwISLDauetcehl of Man 4*42*42*037 

wGAMerfco S 45555 

w GAM Arbitrage 5 37481 

w GAM ASEAN S 41481 


w GAM Boston 1 

mGAJWOaraHI Mlqoetor*a_* 

iv GAM Comtrinea DM 

er GAM Cross-Market S 

w GAM European 2 

■r Gam France—. FF 


w GAM QAMCO t 

w GAM High Yield S 

w GAM East Asia Inc S 

w GAM Japan s 

ir GAM Money MktsUSS S 

tf Do Sterling _C 

tf Do Swiss Franc SF 

tf Do Deutschen torV . _DM 

tf Do Yen Y 

w GAM Allocated MHFFd S 

W GAM Emerg Mkts Mltf-Fd J 
w GAM MftFEurope USS— S 

er GAM MM-Europe DM DM 

wGAMMW-Gtobal USS___1 

w gam Market Neutral l 

w GAM Tradkv DM DM 

or GAM TrmBno US* S 

w GAM PaSflc ? S 

w GAM 5otactk» — — s 
er GAM 5ingapare/Malaysia _* 

wGAM SF Special Band SF 

wGAM Tyche S 

wGAMU.Su S 

w GAMut investments — S 

wGAM Value S 

w GAM Whitethorn S 

wGAMWortdwUe S 

er GAM Band USS Ord _S 

wGAM Band US Spedat S 

wGAM Band SF SF 

w GAM Bond Yen Y 

wGAM Bondi ( 

wGAM I Special Bond C 

wGAM Universal US1 S 


wGAM Band USS Ord S M485 

wGAM Bond US Spedat S 17187 

WGAM Brad SF SF 10488 

w GAM Bond Yen Y 1457200 

wGAM Bead DM DM 12054 

wGAM Band t C 14330 

wGAM (Special Bend c 14*85 

wGAM Universal USS S 1548* 

IV MAM fHMMlto t 34131 

SWISS REGISTERED FUNDS 41-1-422 2*2* 
MuMebodBt nBs e 173JX BmLZartati 

tf GAM (CHJ America SF 155987 

tf GAM (CHI Europe SF V634 

tf GAM (CH) Mondal SF 172188 

rf GAM I CHI Podflc SF 281780 i 

SEC REGISTERED FUNDS 

135 East 57td SheeLNY H02281M8B-4200 

wGAM Europe S 0982 

wGAM Global S 149.77 

wGAM international % 1 SOT 

wGAM Norm America S 8780 

wGAM Podflc BmU X 18228 

IRISH REGISTERED UCIT3 
EaHMort TerracfcDubUn 2. 3S3-1-S7NM30 

wGAM Americano Are DM 9281 

wGAM EurapoAcc DM 13580 

W GAM Orient ACC— — —DM 15433 

WGAM Tokyo ACC— DM 17158 

w GAM TOW Band DM ACC— DM 10985 

w GAM Universal DM Acc — DM 17789 

GLOBAL CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 
Beramta: (809) 2954000 Fan (8091 2954100 
JWH GLOBAL STRATEGIES LTD 
w a Hnondat BMetm* — s u>m 

w D) KT Gtebal S 1B7J9 

w F) G7 Currency S 8*82 

w H) Yen Financial S l«8> 

w J) Dhrersdled mk Adi S 11080 

w K) Inn Currency B Bond -5 11*80 

w JWH WORLDWIDE FND-S IMS 

GLOBAL FUTURES* OPTIONS SICAV 
mFFMIftfBdPragnCHFCIu5F 10080 


w GS Adi Rale Mori. Fd II — S 983 

mGSGtabal Currency S T2378& 

wGS Gluhoi Equity S 1221 

wGS World Band Fund S IRC 

. wGSWorid income Fund — s 7 JO 

OGTTEX FUND MANAGEMENT 

wG.5wap Fund Ecu 12SU5 

GRANITE CAPITAL IHTL GROUP 

w Granite a*4W EauFtY S 18515 

wGrxgitteCapBalMklNoutrots 09929 

w Granite CaniWMorigcRe^s 180B49 

GT ASSET MANAGEMENT {IRELAND] LTD 
Tel: (44) 71 -710 45 S? 
tf GT Asctei Fd A Sham S 

rfGTAsan FdB Shares s 

tfGT Ada Fund A Sham $ 

a GT Ado Fund B Shares—* 
tf GT Aslan Small Comp A Sh8 
tf GT ABksi SmaH Camp B Sh8 
tf GT AiafraBo Fd A shares— s 
rf GT Australia FdBSbares-S 

tf GTAuetr-SmoUCoASh 1 

tf GTAudr. Small CttBSh * 

tf GT Berrv JOPra Fd A Sh— S 

rf GT Berry Jraan FdB 3h S 

tf GTBandFdAShns S 

tfGT Brad FdB Shoves S 

tf GT Donor Fund A Sh 1 

rf GT Doito Food B S h 5 

tf GT Emeratna MBs A Sh — 8 
d GT Emerging Mkts B Sh _j 
d GT Era MW SmaD Co A Sh JJ 
rf GT Em Mkt Smalt Co B ShJ 
w GT Eure Small Co Fd A Sh.* 
w GT Eure SmaH Co Fd B SIlS 
d GT Nona Kong Fd A Shares* 
tf GT Hana Kora Fd B Sharess 
tf GT Haraha PatWMer A ShS 
tf GT Honshu Pathfinder B Sh* 
w GT Jap OTC Stocks Ftf A Sh* 
w GT Jra OTC Sloda Fd B ShS 
w GT Jov Small Q> Fd A Sb— * 
w GT jop sman Co Fd B Sh— s 

W G.T. Laftn America Fd S 

d GT Strategic Bd Fd A 5h — S 
tf GT Strategic Bd Ftf 8 Sh — S 
tf GT Tetccnmm. Fd A ShraesS 
tf GT Tetacumm. Fd B Shares* 
r GT TMywtooy Fund A 5h_8 
r GTTechnatoBY FundBShJ 
GT MANAGEMENT PLC (44 71 718 4* 47} 
tf G.T.BMeCh/Health Fund-* 2356 

rf aT. Deutschland Fund * U3I 

tf G.T. Europe Fond S SMI 

W&T. Global Small Co Fd — S 2897 

d G.T. Investment Fond S 25.15 

■ aT. Kona Fund —8 MS 

wGT.Nevfty indQwntr Fd_S 5884 

eOiT. US SmaB Cempanles— S 2537 

GUBRNSEY CAPITAL MANAGEMENT LTD 

f GCM Global StLEa. S VBJ2 

GUINNESS FLIGHT FD MHOR5 (OmevlJLM 
GUINNESS FLIGHT GLBL STRATEGY FD 

d Mmogcd Currency — * 398} 

d Global Bund — — — * JfM 

tf GtobM High income Bond_5 ZL35 

d OUt & : Band ( OJB 

tf Euro Htsh Inc. Bond 1 2383 

tf Global Equity * 9183 1 

d AmirkOT Btue Chip — * SW 

tf Japan and Podflc -S T2553 

tf UK i .2LS4 

tf mwf — -* 11187 

GUINNESS FLIGHT 1NTL ACCUM FD 
rf Deubctiamark Money— DM nxj7 

rf US Daflm Money * 383*0 

a US Dollar High Yd Bond—X 2475 

tf MTBairacEdGrth * 3M 4 

HA5ENBICMLER ASSET MAN8T BmjnbH. 

wHamrateWerCom AG 5 574408 

wHa an Mc hl cfCoralnc * lUM 

wH ay e n tiictilfrDIv. .8 ltJXJ 

wAFFT — J 13BL4S 

HEPTAGON FUND NV Q777-41555S 

/ Heptagon QLB Fund S TOOK 

m Heptagon CMO Fun* * 

HERMES ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
Bermuda: 007)295 4000. Lux; (357)40444*1 
Final PikH 

m Hermes European Fund — Era MSS 

m Hermes North American Fd* 27984 

m Hermes Asian Find — S 46184 

mHemaEmeraMMsFuiKLB MU2 

m Heme* Strategies Fund — * 

m Hermes Neutral Fund S 1U72 

mHirmsGlobd Fund s 

m Hermes Baod Fund -Ecu 127849 
m Hemes Sterling Fd — t 11382 


mhOrrmej Goto Fund — * 41*31 

INCOME PARTNERS (ASIA) UMfTED 
w Allan Find income Fd— S 1089 

INTERINVEST (BBRMUDA)LTD 

C/b Bank of Bermuda, T*1 :H* 29*4000 

ro Hedge Hag & Conserve PUS 987 

INTERNATIONAL ASSETS FUND 
2. Bd Royal, L-2M7 Luxembourg 

w Europe Sud E Ecu 714* 

INTERNATIONAL MOMT INCOME FUND 
dAmeriauedu Nortf— * 1MI5 

tf Europe O x il ta e u t u l e DM JOOJJ 

d irons Ut UMMO 

tf ZbnaAsonque — * 1000100 

INVSSCO I NTT. LTD, POB 271, JOTMV 
T ot; 44 g * *114 _ . . 

tf Maximum Income Fund l 18000 

tf SwmoaMngaPtfl s 

tf Pioneer Moreen — — c sjuo 

tfOfcam Gtobol Strategy — S 174100 

d Asia Super Growth J 228700 

tfNIomn warrant Fgnd S 23S» 

tfAsla tiger Warrant— * 48700 

rf European Warrant Fund — * 3JWB 

tf Gtd N.W. 1974 * * 3108 

PREMIER SELECT FUNDS 
tf AmertcBH Grewtfl I 

tf American Enterprtae — . A 

tf Asia Tiger Growth S 

tf Dotke- Rcmrvr i 

tf Eu repeo u Growth * 

tf European Enterprteo * 

tf GfeXxri EmerotneMarketi-* 

tfciebal Growth x 

tf Nippon enterprise S 7J 

tf Nlppm Growth S i 

tf UK Growth . 1 *v 

< Sterfing Reserve— 8 
d North Amerkaei Warrant S 5X310 

tf Greater China On— — 8 7J700 

ITALFORTUNE IHTL. FUNDS 
w das* A (Agar. Grown IMU* 7735800 

eCkm 8 (GtatxX Equity) * 1180 

w Oam C (Global Bom) 3 11.07 

eCbaD (Ecu Band) Ecu 1187 

JARDINE FLEMING, GFO BOX 1M48 Hg K> 

tf JF ASEAN Trail * 52X9 

tf JF Far East Wrat Tr 3 28.10 

rf JF Gtobol Conv. Tr s 1484 

rf JF Hana Kara Trost % 1885 

rf JF Japan 9m. Co Tr— Y 5012*00 

tf JF Japan Tru« Y 1279*06 

tf JF Malaysia Trust % 23.M 

0 JF Poctne me. Tr. S 1114 

tf JF Thailand Trust __* 3452 

JOHN GOVETT MANT (LOlMJ LTD 
TN:448M-42M9 

w Gaueli MM. Putum c 1134 

wGawcttMan. FUL US* s 984 

wGevens Gear. Cure S 1X17 

wGovstriGnri But Hckw 1 118539 

JULIUS BAER GROUP 
rf Sotrtxxid SF 

dCentiiH. -- --XB 

tf Eaufbaer America— —* 

tf Eautbaer Europe SF 

tf SFR- BAER SF 

rf Stocfcbar JiF 

tf Swtastaar SF 

tf Ltauaxwr S 

tf Europe Band Fund Ecu 

tf DoMar Brad Fund- . . .8 
tf Austro Bond Fund ——AS 

tf Sob* Bond Fund SF 

rf DM Band Fund. _DM 

d Convert Bond Fund SF 

tf Gtobol Bend Fund DM 

rf Earn Stock Fund Ecu 

d US Slock Fund . ..J 

tf Poctflc Slock Fund S 

tf Swiss Sleek Fund SF 

rf Spectra Swta Stock— SF 

tfJraon Stock Fund Y 

rf German Stock Frad DM 

tf Karera Stock Fund I 

tf Swfss Franc Cash SF 

d DM Cash Fund DM 

tf ECU Cash Fund Ecu 

tf Stcriliig Cash Fuad I 

tf Dollar Cash Fund S 

tf French Franc cash FF 

w Muiltartvtaor Forex Fd I 

KEY ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

m Key Gtotxd Hedge I 27476 

m Kev Hedge Fund Inc * U7J1 

m Key Hedee Investments * 14581 

KIDDER, PEABODY 

b Chesapeake Fund Ltd s 2*046 

b III Fund LM I 1117X0 

4i bin Guaranteed Fund s 127850 

0 Stunehenae Ltd - * 1*067 

LATIN AMERICAN SECURITIES 
Tel: London 171 428 1234 
tf Argentinian Invest a 5Kayf 2*86 
tf Brazilian Invest Co Slcov— * 3458 

tf Cotomblon Invest CO Skxnr_* 1750 

tf Latin Amer Extra Yield Fd * U8491 

tf Lath Amretcu Income Co— I 989 . 

tf Latin American Invest Co_S 1L4S 

tf Mexican Invest Co Stcnv— S 4X3* 

tf Peruvian Invest Co sicov_s 1*10 

LEHMAN BROTHERS 
rf Aston Dragon Port NV A— S 940 

tf Aston Dragon Port NVB_ 5 940 

tf Global Advisors II NV A S 

tf Gtobol Advisors II NV B—S 

tf Global Advisors Port NVA-S 1U2 

tf Global Advisors Part NV BJ1 1187 

rf Lehman Cur Adv. A/B S *86 

rf Premier Futures AdvA/B-J 943 

LIPPO INVESTMENTS 
24/F Lippe Tower Centra, 09 Queensway JtK 
Tei (852) 8*7 *800 Fax 1*52) 5*6 6J» 

w Java Frad S 980 

wAsaan Fixed Inc Fd * 944 

w I DR Money Market Fd * 12J* 

w USD Money Martel Fd S 1042 

W Indonesian Growth Fd— — I m22 

W Aslan Growth Reel S 1083 

wANan Warrant Fund— * 784 

LLOYD BEORGEMNGMT (852) MS 4431 

w Antenna Fund s 1AM 

w LG Asian Smaller Coe Fd_ 1 189420 

wLG India Fond LM. -1 14.18 


LOMBARD 0DIER A aE - GROUP 
. OMLIFLEX LTD (CD ■■ ■ - 

0 Mutticumncv S 2U9 

rf Dallnr Medium Term * 2527 

tf Dollar Lara Term S 2682 

d Japanese Yen Y 491180 

tf Pound Sterling t 2722 

S Deutsche Mark DM 1786 

Dutch Florin FI 1825 

tf HY Earn Curren rirs .. — . F eu 1*89 

tf Swtu Franc SF 1343 

tf US Donor Short Term S 1283 

tf HY Euro Cure DMd Pay— Ecu 11 J* 

tfSwta Multicurrency— SF 17.12 

tf Eurepecm Currency— Ear 22J4 

rf Behrian Fftme BF 13743 

d CUnvertMe S 1541 

tf French Franc FF 14181 

tfSwta Mulfl-DMdend SF 1621 

tf Swiss Franc Short-Term— SF 16121 

tf Canadian Dollar CS 1382 

tf Dutch Ftorin Multi FT 1541 

tf Swiss Franc DMd Pay SF 1182 

tf CAD MUflCvr. MY. - a 1189 

d Mediterranean Cure SF 1L16 

d Convertibles SF 1A14 

MALABAR CAP MGKT (Bermuda) LTD 

OTMatabar Infl Fund * 2685 

MAN INTERNATIONAL FUTURES 

m Mbit Limited- ordinary s 49.17 

in Mint Limited- Income-, * 14J4 

aiMtat Gtd Lid- Spec lssue_S 36.17 

fll/VUnt Gtd Ltd -NOV 2003 * 2499 

mMInt Gtd Ltd- Jon 1994 s 2X14 

m Mbit Gtd Ltd - Dec 79M __* 1987 

BlMW Gtd LJd-Aua 1995—3 1*35 

Ai MM Gtd Currencies S m2? 

mMM Gtd Currencies 2001—8 1685 

mMInt 5p Res Ltd (BNP) % 11082 

m Athena Gtd Futures s 1283 

mAthena GW Currencies s 933 

m Athena Gtd Flrenctols [nc-S 1657 

mAttwna Gtd FTnraciaijCraS 1149 

mAHL Capital Mkts Pd S 1X34 

mAHL Commodity Fund S 1D.fi 

at AHL Currency Fund 1 9J4 

mAHL Real Time Trad Fd — S IBM 

raAHL Gtd Real Time Trtf — * 16J3 

m Maw Guarratoed 1996 LUL—S 98* 

mMaa Leveraged Reaiv. LM8 1 185 

at map Guaranteed 2000 * 1182 

nlMM G GL Fin 20K * 883 

MARITIME MANAGEMENT LTD 
73 Front 5t Hamilton Bermada (809)2929789 
w Maritime Mlt-Ssdar 1 Ltd -8 107097 

w Maritime Glbl Beta Serious *7544 

w Maritime GM Delta SertesJ 85687 

w Martttme Gthi Tau Serins 5 65481 

MATTHEWS INTERNATIONAL MOT 
EMERGING ASIAN STRATEGIES FUND 

mClesiA . . * 12689 

rf Class B S 11*2 

ro Podflc Convert Strut—* 9987 

MAVERICK (CAYMAN) (667) 7W790 

m Maverick Fd — * 

MCKINLEY CAPITAL PARTNERS, LTD 

m The Cnracdr Fundi M * 12486 

MEESP1BRSOK 

Rakta a wradc. Amsterdam wn 1 US) 
m Asia Poe. Growth Fd N.V S 484* 

w Astra Capital Holdings * M2 $ 

w Aston Soled ton FdN.V FI 1M4] 

w DP Amer. Growth Fd H.V..8 J7J1 

w EMS OHshora Fd N.V. n W7.13 

w Europe Growth Fund N.V. -Ft 4*JB 

w Japan DFversHted Frad S 5430 


wTokyoPac. Hold. N.V. * 2 

MERRILL LYNCH 

tf Dolter A»a?s Portfolio 5 

tf Prime Rate Porttoilo J 

MERRILL LYNCH SHORT-TERM 
WORLD INCOME PORTFOLIO 

tf Class A * 

d QanB — * 

MERRILL LYNCH 

GLOBAL CURRENCY BOND SERIES 
AUSTRALIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
tf Category A —AS 

■ tf rntiitiiUT n —AS 

CANADIAN DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 
rf Category A — CS 

0 Category p - - " 

CORPORATE HIGH INCOME PTFL 

d Class A- 1 S 

d Class A-2 8 

tfdassB-1 * 

tf ChwAW. 1 * * 

DEUTSCHE MARK PORTFOLIO 
tf Category ft —PM 

tfCntwerY P.. nM 

EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (DM) 
tf Qmx A-l J 

tf OossA-2 * 

d Class B-l -» 

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EUROPEAN BOND PORTFOLIO (USD 
tf CIMA.I- [Ut >■ 

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tf Clraxh-l « in 

rfOmaB-2 5 leS 

POUND STERLING PORTFOLIO 

tf CnUttorvA t 1JM 

tf Category a > 1544 

US DOLLAR PORTFOLIO 

it Category A s 1330 

d Category B * liu 

YEN PORTFOLIO 

tf C ategory A Y 1297 

tf Category w w 120 

MULTI CURRENCY BOND PTFL 
tfQneiA.. . 2242 

rfCbTKB , 2180 

U S FED ERAL SECURITIES PTFL 
rf amt . « lu 

rf Ckm B \ iftn 

MERRILL LYNCH 
HUITY / CONVERTIBLE SERIES 
BASIC VALUE PORTFOUO 

tfCkssA « 14.ee 

rf Cta i B ? m3 

CONVERTIBLE SECURITIES PTFL 
tf Dm*. 1 uu 

d Cm-* B « itn 

GLOBAL ALLOCATION PTFL (USS) 

JCtoA S 1657 

rf OneeB_ » 

GLOBAL EQUITY PORTFOUO 
rf einyi a , « i nn 

tf Class B « mi 

EURO EQUITY PORTFOLIO 

tf CtoHA— * MRS 

tf Class B S 1387 

LATIN AMERICA PORTFOUO 
rf OmA — % 1455 

rf CfamB e JiS 

WORLD NATURAL RESOURCES PTFL 

eCkml _ t 12AS 

rf DM R « 1, ey 

DRAGON PORTFOUO 

rf gtanA i 75J9 

If CtaSS B J 1SD» 

MERRILL LYNCH INC * PORTFOLIO 

rf r-inw j c un 

tf nnBk- 1 881 

tf e iq 

MERRILL LYNCH MEXICAN INC PORT 

tf Mexican Inc* Ptfl a A J 98* 

tf Mexican Inc 5 Ptfl OB— 5 98* 

rf Mexican lac Peso Ptfl a A3 9.15 

tf Mexican Inc Peso P HI OBJ 7.15 

MOMENTUM ASSET MANAGEMENT 
tr Momentum Havener Portal idlm 

m Momentum Rainbow Ftf * 12833 

m Mome nt um RxR Rjj * 1981 

m Momentum Stadanratar * 16158 

MORVAL VONWILLBR ASSET MBT C* 
wWUtertends-Wlllcft»ndCapS 1557 

wWIteflunds-WteeriMndEurEa 1X55 

wWUterfuretowaiereaEur—Ecu 1380 

wWlllerfund*wiitoroq tlatv-Ut 128278B 
wW)llerhjeds-WllleraqNA_S 1181 

MULTIMANAGER M.V. 

■.rueuiMMi 1 1646 

w Emerging Markets Fd * 2384 

w European Growth Fd— Em 1581 

w Hedge Fund * 1337 

w Japanese Fund Y 875 

w Market Neutral S 1188 

■eWorld Band Fund Ecu 1X97 

N ICHOLA5- A PP LEGATE CAPITAL MOT 
tr HA Flexible Growth Fd_J 157MB 

wna Hedge Fund S 1349151 

NOMURA IHTL (HONG KONG) LTD 

tf Nemura Jakarta Fund * *85 

NORIT CURRENCY FUND 

mNCFUSO- S 62685 

tflNCF DEM DM S7S89 

mNCFCHF SF 92477 

aiNCFFRF FF 44*080 

mNCF JPY .Y 82*9506 

OtNCFBEF BF 27D3X80 

ODEY ASSET MANAGEMENT LTD 
21 Grosvenor StJJto W1X 7FE44-7T-479 2778 

tf Oder European DM 15839 

wOdev Eurooera * 15843 

wader Eurw Growth ine dm uzlsi 

■vOdey Europ Growth Acc DM 15387 

wOdnv Euro Grth Star Inc c *0*6 

wOdev Euro Grmster Ace— I *082 

OLYMPIA CAPITAL INTI. INC 
Wiliams House. Hamilton HM11, Bermuda 
Tel: *69 292-1618 Fax: *67 295-2305 

w Finsbury Group S 22185 

w Olympia Secortte SF SF 17X17 

wOiymplo Emeni MktoS 98087 

■v Winch. Eastern Dragon— S 1737 

w winch. Frontter * 31154 

nrWkKtL Fat. Otynsta Star-8 I4U0 

w winch. Gi Sec Inc PI (A) s 788 

e- Which, Gl Sec Inc PI (CT t 732 

w Winch. Hkta Inti MaiSson_Ecu 146785 

w Winch. Hkta leri Ser D — -Ecu 172731 

e> Winch. Hktg inri Ser F Ecu 171411 

iv Which. HldgOty Star HetteeS 1164*3 

w Winch. Reser. MuttL Gv Bd8 1974 

w Winchester Thailand * 3835 

OPTIMA FUND MANAGEMENT 
73 Front SL Hamiltanjaermuda *07 2758A5B 

w OpUmo Emerald Fd Ltd % 16.10 

wOoflma Fund » 1641 

w Optima Futures Fund — * 1783 

w Optima Gtobol Fond s 1430 

w Optima PericulaFd Ud 6 HUH 

IV Optima short Fond S *.15 

PACTUAL 

tf Eternity Fund LM S 3145324 

d infinity Fund LM * 4958501 

rf Star High Yield Fd Ltd 6 miSO 

PARIBAS-GROUP 

W Luxor — — J 

tf Porvast USA B— — 8 
tf Parvcst Japan B——Y 

tf ParvestAsiaPocHB 6 

tf ftarvest Europe B Ecu 

tf Pareesi Holland B FI 

tf Parvext France B— FF 

tf Pareesi Germany B DM 

tf Parvcst OhttTtofl or B S 

tf PanmstObiLDMB-. DM 


tf Parvast Obfi-DM G— DM 
d Ptrvest OW 1-Yen B— _Y 

tf FarratOhlMSuidenB R 

rf Porvest OWVFranc B FF 

tf ParvesraUhSterB 1 

tf Porvast OMI-Ecu B— Ecu 

rf PmvestOMLBeiux B LF 

rf Pareesi S-T Dodar B 6 

d Porvast S-T Europe B Ecu 

tf Porvest 5-T DEM B DM 

tf Porvest 5-T FRF B FF 

d Porvest S-T Bet Plus B__BF 

tf Prevest Global B — LF 

rf Parvest Ini Bonds. .. 3 

tf Porvest OMHJroB Ut 

tf Porvest Int Equities I* * 

tf Porvest UK B t 

tf Porvest USD Plus B * 

rf Porvest S-T CHF B SF 

tf Puniest Obft-CanodoB CS 

tf Pervert OUi-DKK 8 DKK 

PERMAL GROUP 

r Cormwxflnta Ltd S 79239 

f Drofcknr Growth N.V S 38*581 

f Emerging Mkts Hktos % 95075 

f EoraMIr (Ecu) LM Ecu T77B89 

f Investment Hldgs N.V_ S 13*486 

t Media 6 Commw*cutfons_s 10797S 

/ Ham* LM S 161651 

PICTET A C1E- GROUP 

WP.CFUK VcJ(UJX) C 6544 

erPJLF Germaval (Lux) —DM 9733 

wP.CF Naramval (Lux) S 2955 

w P.CF Wdlber (Lux) Ptas HM2786 

w PCJ r Voiltailrf (Lux) LH 11381486 

m P.CF VaHrance (Lux) FF 13S139 

w PJLF. Vattond SFR (Lux) ^F 29*31 

w P.UJF, Voibond USD (Lux) _* 23382 

w PJJ J. Valband Ecu ILux) -Ecu 18781 

M- P.UJ=. voibond FRF (Uix)_FF 9S439 
I nr PJUJF. Vabusl GBP (Lux)-i 97.12 

w PAJf. VaOxrai DEM (Lux) DM 29781 

wPAJ.F. U5* Bd Ptfl (Lux! S 10235680 

W PJJJ*. Model Fd Ecu 1237* 

wP.U.T. Emerg Mkts ILux>_6 19411 

w P.U.T. Eur. Onpori (Luxl —Ea 15887 

b PJJ.T. Global Value (Luxl -Ecu 151.12 

wPJJ.T.Eurovai (Luc) Ecu 2Z774 

tf PtcfetVabubre(CHl SF M 75* 

mint! Smril Can (IOM) 6 694*4 

PREMIER INVESTMENT FUNDS LTD 
c/o P4X Bax 1 W Onsid Caymaa 
Fax: IB99S S49-OT93 

m Premier U5 Equity Fund— 6 121*62 

m Premier Eq Risk AW Fd—S 13*985 

m Premier Inti Eq Fund % 1316JM 

a Premier Sovereign BdFd_3 128479 

m Premier Global BdFd * 150X17 

ro Premier Totoi Return Fd S D9277 

PUTNAM 

rf Emerytao With Sc True! I 4154 

er Putnam Em. mta.ScTrusl5 4116 

rf Putnam Gtobi High Growth 5 1782 

rf Putnam Hi gh Inc GNMA Fd* 642 

tf Putnam Inn Fund 6 1537 

QUANTUM GROUP OF FUNDS 
iv Emeratna Growth Fd N.v._* 17245 

er Quantum Fund N.V. ■ 8 WOOLS) 

nr Quantum Realty Trust S 13781 

•vQureitum UK Realty Fund_I 104*0 

•v Quasar mn Fund N.V 6 14781 

w Quota Fund N.V * 1*420 

QUARRY MANAGEMENT LTD 
Tetaohonc: Iff -949403) 


LUX) Pta* HK2786 

(Lux) Ut 11101480 

1 (LUX) FF 136170 

SFR (Lux) JSF 29*31 

USD [LUX 1-1 23302 

Ecu ILux) -Ecu 18781 

FRF (Lux)JFF 98439 

GBP (Lux)-t 97.12 

DEM (Lux) DM 29781 

Ptfl (Lux! — S 10235680 


an Hedge Fd Ltd s/a 8 TUI 59 

Fund LM i/5 S 8642 

f FUND MANAGEMENT LTD 


tv Nova Lai Podflc Inv Co * 

■v Pacific Arbitrage Co S 

ggsansgroam 


POB 9713000 AZ RattenSrenJ31)l02241ZM 

tf RG America Fond F! 14886 

tf RG Europe Fond FI 133JD 

tf RG Poctflc Fund FT 14450 

d RG Dlvtrente Fond ■ -.-FI 5436 

rf RG Money Plus F fi fi ijw 

rf RG Money PtusFS * 16171 

tf RGAAeneyPlue FDM dm 11LIO 

tf RG Money Pta* FSFj* — SF 106J6 

More Robecosee Amsterdam Stocks 


ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND DE) 
IN-HOUSE FUNDS 
IV Asian Capital Holdings FdJ 
IV Dal wo LCF Rothschild Bd Jl 

wDaleaLCF Rrtftsth Eq S 

iv Farce Cash Tradition CH FJF 

wLMrom e 

iv Leveraged Coe HaWinas S 

w QMI-Vakr SF 

0 Prt Ow i tange S wi» Fd 5F 

b PrteguBv Fo-Eunwe ■ -.Ecu 
b Prtequlty Fd-HelveHa— SF 
ft PrirmltY Fd-Lattn Am — A 
ft Pribnnd Fund Ecu., ■ - - E at 

b Pruned Fond USD * 

ft Prtttond Ftf HY Emer MMU 

■vSrivcflve Invert SA * 

b «• 

iv US Bond Plus S 


ROTHSCHILD (GROUP EDMOND 
OTHER FUNDS 
tf Asta/Jonon Emerg. Growths 17JB548 

w Esprit Eur Portn inv Trt^En 140659 

iv EUTOP ShnteglnvertmM -Ecu 16*480 

b Integral Futures. * WHt2l 

ft OpflMrt Gttef Ftf General DM M94S4 

b Otflgert Gwaxfl Fix hichmDM issbq 

tf Podflc Nles Fund— I 637 

arPennqJdrafckor Growth NVS 306*37 

t Setoctton Horizon FF ITOO.17 

b Vlctolre Artone J 506U9 

ROTHSCHILD ASSET MGMT (CUD LTD 
M Nemred Leveraged HU — J* M736 

SAPDIE GROUPfKEY ADVISORS LTD 

fltKevOtyemfMlncFdudus 1186802 

SAFRA REPUBLIC HOLDING 
iv Republic GA M — « 

w Republic CAM America—* 
iv Rep GAM Em Mkts Gtobol ut 
e, Rep GAM Em Mkts Lot Am* 
iv Republic gam Europe SF-U5F 
iv Republic GAM Europe U5SJ 
at Republic GAM Grvrih Chfjsf 

w Republic GAM Growth f c 

iv Republic GAM Growth USLS 
re Republic GAM Opportunity S 
re Republic GAM Predflc— 8 

re Republic Gnsey Dollnc S 

w RvcubOc Graev Eur Inc dm 

iv Republic Lot Am Aitoc * 

iv RePtXsllc Lot Am Argml I 

re Repueuc Lot Am Brazil S 

re Republic Lot Am Maxim 5 

re Republic Lot Am Venez S 

re Rep Sotamon Strut FdLM_s 

SANTANDER HEW WORLD INV. 

mGmmmter Fund S KMJSf 

m Explorer Freid — S mmr 

SKANDIHAVISKA EHSKILDA BAHKEM 
S-E-BANKEN FUND 

tf Europe Inr « 181 

tf FReranOstaffllnc * 073 

d Gtobol Inc s %M 

tf Lakonredtl Inc $ 1 M 

tf VOriden Inc S 1JM 

tf Japan Inc y 9978 

tf Miiio Inc * 18* 

! tf Sverige me Sefc IBM 

tf Nortlanierfka Inc S 180 

tf Tfeknolagi Inc S 1.12 

if Sverige RaaMond Inc Sefc NL42 

SKANDIFONDS 

tf Equity Inti Acc 6 1736 

tf Equity mn Inc * 1367 

rf Equity Global * 158 

rf Equity Nat Resources 1 186 

tf Emrtty Jason Y 11182 

d Equity Nordte * 158 

d Equity U.K S 186 

tf Equity Conti n e nta l Europe-* ITT 

d Equity Mediterranean * 186 

rf Equity North America * XII 

tf Equity Far East 6 458 

rf Inn Emerging Markets 5 14* 

tf Bond mn ACC S 1244 

tf Bond mn Inc S 748 

tf Bond Europe Acc— S 157 

tf Bond Europe Inc I 058 

tf Band Sweden Acc Sefc 1736 

rf Bund Sweden inc Sefc 1050 

rf Bond DEM Acc DM 131 

tf Band DEM Inc DM 054 

tf Band Dollar US Acc S 141 

rf Bond Dollar US Inc S 18* 

tf Curr. US Dollar. —3 155 

tf Curr. Swedish Kronor Sak 1231 

SOCIETE BENE RALE GROUP 
SOGELUX FUND (SF) 

re SF Bonds A UJLA 6 1*41 

re SF Bonds B Germany DM 3159 

re SF Bend* C France FF 13158 

re SF Bonds E GB. c 1254 

irSF Band* F Japan— — Y 2345 

re SF Bands G Europe Ecu 1880 

reSF Bands H World wide I 1*45 

re SF Band* J Betgtom BF 83480 

reSF Eq. K North America I 1641 

re5F Eq. L W-Europe Ecu 1670 

reSF EiLM Poctflc Bssta— Y 1582 

wSFEq-P Growth Coontrt«3 1787 

w5FEq.Q Goto Mines S 3418 

reSF Eq.R World Wide S 1583 

>5F Short Term S Frxxicn— FF 1*74300 

re SF Short Term T Eur Ecu 1*37 

SODJTIC ASSET MANAGEMENT INC 

re 5AM Brazil 8 21651 

re SAM Diversified * IMM& 

w SAM/McGarr Hedge * 11X02 

re 5AM opportunity S QU 

re SAM Strategy % 12130 

ro Alpha SAM— * 12955 

re GSAM Composite S 34131 

SR GLOBAL FUND LTD 

MSR European S 9746 

mSRAUai S 9852 

mSR letwiyttaM i S 16151 

SVENSKA HAMDELSSAK7CEN SJL 
146 Bd de la Petnaee, L-23B Luxembourg 

ft SHB Band Font * 5547 

wSvenka SeLFdAracrSii—S 1587 

reSvenrtaiScL Fd Germany— 8 1137 

reSverokn SeL Ftf Inti Bd SlU* 1237 

reSvcrakaScLFdlntlSh— S 5784 

reSvenskaSeLFd Jam — — Y 407 

reSvWtrtwSeLFdMrtt-Mkt — Sefc 11553 

w Svenska SeL Fd PacH Sh * 742 

reSvensfcaSeLFd9wedB«te-Sek 143880 

re Svenska SeL Fd Sylvia Sh_Ecu 14*758 
SWISS BANK COUP. 

tf SBC UI0 Index Fund SF ISfiftO 

d SBC Equity PtfMullralkL-AS 22B86 

tf SBCEtodly PtfFCanada— C* 22880 

tf SBC Eautty Ptfl-Eorooe — Ecu 17880 

rf SBC Eq Ptfl- Netherlands — FI 38X06 

tf SBC Govern Bd A/B S S 100755 

tf SBCBandPtfl-AurtrSA — At 11335 

rf 5BC Bond PtfT-Aastr 1 8 — AS TZL27 

tf SBC Bend PtfKTOLSA O 11385 

rf SBC Bond Ptfl-ConJB CS 12B49 

rf SBC EtondPtfl-DMA DM 17073 

tf SBC Bond Ptfl-OM B DM 181JS 

tf SBC Band PtfHAllCh G. A— FI 17036 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-Dutch Gl B_F1 181 JO 

d SBC Bond Ptfl-Ecu A Ecu 11530 

0 SBC Band Ptfl-Ecu B Ecu 131.11 

tf SBC Band Ptfl-FF A FF 59847 

tf SBC Band Ptfl-FF B JF F *11.91 

tf see Band Ptfi-PtasA/fl — Pin 974480 

rf SBC Bond Ptfl-Storllng A __t 5*.U 

tf SBC Band PttMteritog B _j 6057 

rf SBC Band Partial to-SF A SF I1S241 

rf SBC Bond PorifofkFS F B — SF 14113* 

tf SBC Bond Ptfl-USi A S 10545 

tf sbc Band Ptfl-us* b s mn 

rf SBC Bond Ptfl- Yen A Y M9T1730 

tf SBC Band PtfVYen B Y 1140*400 

rf 5BCMMF-A* AI 429740 

tf SBC MMF - BFR BF 11165800 

tfSBCMMF-Can5 <3 467170 

rf SBC DM Short-Term A DM 102048 

tf SBC DM Shari-Term B DM 132040 


SBC MMF- Dutch G FI 73ZL45 

SBC MMF -Ecu ECU 373833 

SBC MMF -ETC ETC 45163786 

SBC MMF- FF FF 2506L 35 

SBC MMF -Ut Lit 53saan 

SBC MMF -Pt« Pla 3*103086 

SBCMMF-ScWWng A5 3184587 

SBC MMF- Sterling 1 281*83 

SBC MMF - SF SF 588471 

SBC MMF -US- Dollar 8 719746 

SBC MMF • USVII * 2085 43 

SBC MMF - Yen Y 577X7580 

SBC GIW-PtflSF Grit) SF 719631 

SBC Glbi-Ptfl Ecu Grth Ecu 129934 

5BCGIW-PM1 USD GTOl S 118784 

SBC GM-Ptfl SF YW A SF 1TI848 

SOC GtoFPin SF YW B 5F 1220112 

SBC GiW-Ptn Ear Ytd A Ecu 122154 

SBC Gthl-Pttl ECU Yld B Ecu 134*41 

SBC GflJl-Pffl U5D YW A — S 167957 

SBC Glbi-Ptfl USD YU B_S 11B747 

SBC Glbi-Pffl SF Inc A 5F M7677 

SBC GlW-Ptfl SF Inc B 5F 1115.fi 

SBC dW-PIfl Ecu inc A Ecu 114431 

SBC GBU-Ptfl Ecu Inc B ECU 11*496 

SBC Glbi-Ptfl USD Inc A 1 101X12 

SBC GIM-Ptfl USD Inc B 5 163444 

SBC Obi Ptfl-OM Gnnvm_DM 108171 

SBC GIW Ptfl-OM YU A/B _DM 105*78 

SBC GIW Ptfl-DM Inc A/B -DM 1045.12 

sbc Emerging Markets — JS 114889 

SBC Sman & MM Cap* Sw_5F 54080 

AmerlcnVotar 1 3TO88 

AngtoVOtor 1 22750 


rf Convert BnnrtSalection. ■ SF 10941 

rf OMork Bond SrtocHan DM 11685 

if Doflar Band Selection S 13737 

rf Ecu Bond Selection. Ecu 105.18 

rf Florin Bond Setod tan FI 12127 

rf FranceVtttor . . FF 2140123 

tf GermanlaVOtar DM 53857 

rf Gold Porttoilo S 40043 

rf IberiaValar Pta *257480 

tf Itaivatar Lit 48*13580 

tf JapanPortfoito Y 2505480 

tf Start tag Band Setoctton. ..I 11389 

tf Sw. Foreign Bond Se tortious f 11141 

tf SwtssVatar SF 59925 

tf Universal Bend Selection _SF 7686 

tf UnFversat Fond— JF 12681 

d Yen Band Sriedbm — Y TT72580 

TEMPLETON W.WIDE INVESTMENTS 
GROWTH PORTFOLIO 

ff OHS A-l S 13JB 

tf OossA-2 S 1*82 

d Class A-3 S 1482 

d Claw B-l * 1253 

tf Class B-2_ S 1643 

INCOME PORTFOUO 

ilOnmb * 934 

tf data B S 949 

THORNTON MANAGEMENT LTD 

d podf inwtFdSAI r 1433 

tf PadflnvtFdSADM DM 3533 

tf Eastern Cnsoder Fund __8 14.14 

tf Thor, Uttl Dragons Fd Ltd 5 3946 

tf Thornton Orient Inc Fd Ltd 8 2733 

tf Thornton Ttga'FdLM 8 5053 

tf Managed Selection * 2243 

w Jakarta 8 1542 


tf r— — - 
NEW TIGER SEL FUND 

tf Hong Kang ■* 5832 

0 Japan s 1837 

tf Philippine* S 6431 

d ThdtoM S 2943 

tf Malaysia s 2650 

tf Indonesia S 188 

tf US* Liquidity 1 . ms 

tf China S 1*24 

tf sinaapore __8 2186 

THORNTON TAIWAN FUND 

tf Equity income s 1249 

tf Equity Growth S I486 

tf Liquidity 1 168 b 

UEBERSEEBANK Zurich 

tfB-Fufld SF 134*26 

tf E-Pund SF *6984 

tfJ-Fund SF 38Z39 

tf M-Fuad SF 127S46 

ff UBZ EunHnaxne Fund SF 1674 

d UBZ World Income Fund —Ecu 5U3 

tf UBZ Geld Fund S 134.19 

tf UBZ Htopon Convert SF 128SJZ7 

tf Asto Growth convert SFR-SF 1214.17 

tfAata Growth Convert US*_8 116343 

tf UBZ DM -Bond Fund DM U48D 

tf UBZ D- Fund DM 11143 

tf UBZ MM Equity Fund™5F 11786 

tf UBZ AmarianEq Fund S 9*74 

tf UBZ 5 -Band Fond S 9779 

UNION BANCAUtfl ASSET MGT (UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL NASSAU 

reArdefinvesf * 266XI3z 

reArmtawst * ONI 

reBocoftn ■ .———I 11233 1 

wBecktovert s 130284 1 

wBrucinvmt S 1075L72I 


TWRHTDN TAIWAN FUMo ' 


reDinvart ■ .3 273* 

w Din vest Asia* 8 1104 

IV D Invert Inti Fix me 5trat — 1 757. 

reJaaknveel * ton. 

reLw a ib i vert S 969. 

reMorainved S 1250. 

re Marti overt S »49J 

re MourtiT„«.t5 s 'sm. 

w Mourinvcrt Coming led S 1017. ' 

reMnurto’see* Ecu Ecu 1768. 

W Fiftsar -S 2020. 

re Pul wr Overly S 1880. 

re Quantlnvest 1 2*94. 

tv Quantfnvert St * mu 

wStaliitavcrt. 6 3619. 

reTudfciygrt J 1144' 

—n— ■ 8 44BJ 

UNION BAHCAIRE ASSET MGT I UBAM) 
INTERNATIONAL LUXEMBOURG 

IV UBAM* Bond * 1U6J 

re UBAM DEM Band DM 11IL 

re UBAM Emaratoa Growth.. s inn: 

re UBAM FRF Bond FF 5471 

re UBAM Germany DM 12T2: 

re UBAM Gtobol Send Ecu 7411452 

■v UBAM Japan Y 994988 1 

re UBAM Start tag Bond 1 759, 

IV UBAM SHi Podf A Asia S 199> 

re UBAM US EmiHles * 1274. 


UNION BANK OF SWITZERLAND/INTRAG 


tf Bond-invert SF 

tf BriMirecrt SF 

d Canoe SF 

d Convert-Invert SF 

tf D-Mark -invert — —DM 

rf Dodar-I overt S 

tf *** »■ — ■ *■ • « n 

tf ESPOC SF 

tf Earit SF 

tf Fcnso— — SF 

d Fltxicft, SF 

tf Germoc. ... ■ — SF 

d Gtobtavert SF 

rf Gold-invert SF 

1 1 Gulden-Invert FI 

tf Hetvttlnvert SF 

tf Hal land- Invert 5F 

tf Hoc SF 

d Japan-Invert SF 

d Pactflc-lnvert SF 

rfSaflf SF 

rf Skandtaovlen-lnvert SF 

rf -HwHrn^iMMi t 

d Swtm Franc-invert 5F 

tf Sima SF 

d Swtarrol SF 

tf UBS America Udina SF 

tf UBS America Latina * 

tf UBS Asia New Horizon SF 

tf UBS Ado New Horizon S 

tf UBS Small C Europe SF 

tf UBS Snail C Europe DM 

tf UBS Part Inv SFR Inc SF 

tf UBS Pori Inv SFR COP G_ SF 

tf UB5 Part Inv Ecu Inc SF 

tf UB5 Part Inv Ecu Inc Ecu 

tf UBS Port Inv EcuCapG 5F 

d UBS Pert Inv Eca Cap G— Ecu 

tf UBS Part Inv US* Inc S 

rf UBS Port Inv USS Inc SF 

d UBS Pari Inv US* Cap G SF 

tf UBS Part Inv USS Cap G —8 

tf UBS Part inv DM inc SF 

tf UBS Pari Inv DM inc DM 

tf UBS Port Inv DM CB»G SF 

tf UB5 part lire DM COP G DM 

tf Yen-invert Y 

tf UBS MM Invesi-USS 8 

tf UBS MM lnvert-£St— _I 

tf UBS MM Invert-Eai Ecu 

tf UBSMMInnmt-Yrei Y 


meoy 
12116 y 
16786 y 
TlLlflv 
10148 y 
6X52 v 
10*35 V 
*473 V 
7441 y 
16580 y 
IS&S9V 
7471V 
7938 y 
11480 V 
10135 V 
119.10V 
87*2780 V 
TO11.12 
40B42 
51331 
10086586 


tf UBS MM Invert-Lll Lit 16337*380 

tf UBSMM invert-SFR A— SF 507*30 

tf UBS MM Invttt-SFR T 5F 578830 

tf UB5 MM Invert-FF FF S12LI5 

tf UBS MM Invert-HFI R 102L97 

0 UBS MM Invert-Can 8 Cl 181537 

tf UBS MM lnvart-BFR BF 2646680 

tf UB5 Short Term Inv-DM DM 55112 

tf UBS Band bnr-Ecu A Ecu 1078* y 

tf UBS Band Inv-EaiT Ecu 1663Dy 

tf UBS Band UwSFR SF 10431 y 

tf UBS Band inv-DM dm 10649 y 

tf UBS Band imKtsx * inuey 

d UBS Band lnv-FF FF IllLOly 

tf UBS Band tavOmS CS 105J*y 

tf UBS Band InvJJl LH 118(C2780y 

rf UBS BJ-USS Extra Yield S 9613 y 

tf UBS Fix Term inv-USS94_8 ll032r 

tf UBS Fix Term Inv-lSt 94—* 11141 y 

tf UBS Fix Term lnv-SFR96_SF 11175 y 

tf UBS FIX Term InvDM 76— DM 11687v 

tf UBS Fix Term 1fnr-Ecu9t_Ear 1 15.92 y 
d U BS Fix Term lnv-FF 76—FF 11532 y 

tf UBSEqlmFEuraacA DM 23978 Y 

tf UBSEqlnvCurapeT —DM 24*27 y 

rf UBSEq ImeSCap USA S 13178 y 

tf UBS Part I Fix UK (SFR >—SF 70053 y 

tf UBS Parti Fix IK (DM) —DM lKL20y 

tf UBS Portl Fh IK (Ecu)— Ecu MM86y 

rf UBS Pori I Fix lac (U5S1— J 9971 y 

tf UBSCcptavWWSFR SF 10637 y 

tf UBSCaplnv-90/10 U5S * 16*41 y 

tf UBSCoplnv9W1BGarm—DM 12545 y 

WORLDFOLIO MUTUAL FUNDS 

tfS Dally Income S 186 

tf DM Dally income DM 180 


tf I Band Imxne. 
tf Non-SBands_ 


rf Hon-* Bonds S 2554 

tf GfttoaJ Bands i m2J 

tf Gtobol Bafcmxd s 1852 

rf Gtobol Equities. S 7*43 

tf US Conservative EquHla-S 1462 

tf US AorerofvB Equities _— * I486 

tf European Equities 8 SttS® 

tf PocHlc Equities * 1X42 

tf Natural Resources S 542 

YIELD ENHANCEMENT STRATEGISTS 
tf Enhanced Treas. Returns _S LI 1937 



re Fntrflew mn Ltd — * 

w Fairfield SaWY Ltd — J 

re FotrfMtf Strategies LM S 

roFntumFiinrt.. . i 

m Firebird Overseas Ltd s 

re Brat Eogte Fund 9 

re First Ecu LM Ecu 

ro First Frontier Fund * 

m First inti Investment Ltd * 

re FL Trait Asto S 

re FL Trust Switzerland SF 

tf Fandttalta S 

re Fontux 1 Money SF 

re Panhn 2 Devtae— SF 

re Fankn 3 - Intt Band — _SF 

re Formula SdecHon Fd SF 

mFutireeGenerafloo LM * 

fliGEM Generation Ltd 9 

m Gemini Cay* LM * 

m Gems Progressive Fd Ltd—* 

ro German SeL Associate* DM 

mGFfflC Growth Find S 

re Global 93 Fond IMS 5 

* gtobol Arbitrage LM SF 

ft Gtobol Cap Fd BVI LM S 

reGtoMFufumMatLM * 

m Gtobol Manew i v Fd LM S 

*r Gannanl SF 

tf Green Une France FF 

roGuaranteed Capital tain W LF 
re HerUnser Latte Amer— s 

t Haussmann Hides H.V. s 

re HB Investment* LM — 
m l toml ip here Neutral Feb 28* 
tf Heritage Cap Growth FdLta* 

reHBSfla Fund , - . . s 

ft HtehbridM Capital Corn * 

re Horizon Fund FF 

re Ibex Holdlra* Ltd SF 

re I FDC Japan Fund Y 

ft ILA-I6B * 

b ila-iof s 

ft ILA-INL 8 

re imBea Currency Fd Ltd s 

r l nfi Securities Fund Ecu 

if interhmtfSA 5 

tf liwesto DW5 DM 

re Japan Poctflc Fund * 

ro JnxniSeiectkni Asses Y 

re Japan Select Ion Fund— js 

w Kenmar Gtd. Series 2 S 

re Kanmar Guartxdeed s 

mKI Asia Podflc Fd Ltd % 

re KM Global 8 

tf KML-lltfigtlYttM 5 

re Korea Dynamic Fund S 

iv Korea Growth Trust I 

m i_F.YleM& Growth Fd S 

re La Fbveife Hotosnss LM— -3 

w Lo Joita Ir rt Grth Fd Ltd S 

ft Latermao: onshore Strains 

wLeafScov * 

ro Leu Performance Fd S 

re LF iiit—iMitv—iil « 

ro London P ort to fio Service* S 

. mLPS mil HJ»8i s 

reLuxhmd 8 

roLymc SeL Hokflnas SF 

1 re M 1 MnitMlratW 8 

reMJOnedan onjhore, NV__S 

m Moater Cop & Hedge Fd s 

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For 

^investment 

information 

Read 

the MONEY REPORT 
every Saturday 
in the IHT 


“inc „ 

194 • 

.1*7- 

i 



andofloredprioBl 





,- Dutch FWn; 


For information on how to list your fund, fax Simon OSBORN at (33-1) 46 37 21 33. 


U r.* i’r^ 

j 1 ? t i - 


The conference program 
will highlight the investment 
opportunities in 
Latin America following the 
region’s economic revivaL 


Latin America 

A New Investment Partner 


LONDON • JUNE 9 - 10 ■ 1994 


licralbS&rilmnr 



MVHraKEHTtoUto 


FOR FURTHER 
INFORMATION ON THE 
CONFERENCE: 

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International Herald Tribune 
63 Long Acre, London WC2E 9JH, England 
Tel: (44 71) 836 4802 
Fax: (44 71)836 0717 


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INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 


SPORTS 



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In Crunch Time, 
Call f Big Nasty’ 


Williamson Powers Arkansas 


1 15V 

.ay- 

l X 

.a 


By Steve Berko witz 

Washington Past Service 

DALLAS — Arkansas's Corliss Williamson has the size of a t ac kle, the 
agility of a guard and the offensive game of a center. 

What does that make him? 


“Probably the best true power forward in college basketball," the 
Thurman said. “I think Glenn Robinson is not 


Arkansas guard Scotty . _ . 

really a power, power forward. That's what Coriiss is." Robinson is 
Purdue's consensus national player of the year. 


Robinson's nic knam e is Big Dog. WDlimisoa't is_ Big^N ast^f 


Before warm-ups for home games, the 6-foot-7, 250-pound (2-meter, 
1 13-kilogram) sophomore spends 15 to 20 minutes lifting weights. On the 
road, where there are no weight rooms adjacent to the Razor backs locker 
room, he settles for sit-ups and push-ups. 

“You go in and pump iron, and your adrenaline gets to flowing," he 
“You start sweating. It gets me into an aggressive mood. Usually 
that carries on out there to the court." 

Or, in his back to the locker room, where he carries oui another 
ritual before every game. He punches each of his t eammat e s in the chest 
as they head out to the court. 

“I don’t hit them as hard as I can,” he said. “1 hit them pretty hard 
though. It’s kind of like a gut check — you know, to see if their hearts are 
there." 

So far, they have been. With Williamson leading the way, the Razor- 
backs are headed to the National Collegiate Athletic Association tourna- 
ment Final Four this weekend in Charlotte, North Carolina. 

After being named Southeastern Conference player of the year, he has 
shot a mere 72-3 percent in the NCAA tournament (34-f ar-ATf That 
figure feD with his practically scattershot 6-for-10 performance in Sun- 
day's Midwest Regional f inal victory over Michigan. 

But because he now has more than the requisite 70 career attempts in 
NCAA tournament play, he has surpassed UCLA's Bill Walton as the 
letter in career NCAA tournament Add goal percentage. Walton was 
109-for-159 (.686) in 12 games. Williamson is 53-for-72 (.736) in seven. 

When the Razorbacks needed an important basket late in Sunday’s 
game, they went to Williamson even though he had scored just six points 
on 3-of-7 shooting during the first 34 minutes. He came through by 
muscling in three baskets in as many attempts. The last one gave 
Arkansas a 69-63 lead with 2:45 to play. 

"The last few minutes the coaches looked at me and my teammates 
looked at me and told me to step it up,” Williamson said. “I looked at 
myself and 1 said: 'They’re right. I have to step it up. It's crunch time.’ " 

In a way, of course, it's crunch time all the time for Williamson. Yes, he 
can handle the ball on die perimeter, shoot jump shots out to 17 feet or 
drive the ball to the goal Sure, he can definitely thunder down the court 
on a fast break, make a ballet-like leap, and then slam down an aBey-oop 



Withthe World Not on Its Suki 
Arizona Is Primed for Victory 


W ? 


1m' 


it**: 




By Jay Privman 

Sew York Tima Service 

LOS ANG ELES — Whether 
they are dealing from reality or 
fantasy, Arizona's basketball team 
has decided that much of the West- 
ern world is united against i t, and 
the Wildcats are using that percep- 
tion as a motivational ploy in the 
National Collegiaie Athletic Asso- 
ciation. tournament. 

The Wildcats qualified for this 
weekend’s Final Four in Charlotte, 
North Carolina, by thoroughly 
dominating Missouri, 92-72, in the 
Western Regional final. That tri- 
umph put Arizona (29-5) only two 
victories from the end of a journey 
that began almost one year ago. 

Arizona has had one of the most 
highly rated teams in the country, 
but in both the 1992 and 1993 tour- 


Damcn Sioudanrire, the junior 
guard who led Arizona with ,27 
points against Missouri, said: 
*This year’s team, we’ve been to- 
gether. The way we played all sea- 
son, we had something special. 
We're all cohesive. We don’t argue. 
It's great to be around the whole 
program- 1 think that’s the biggest 
difference from our past” 

“I hope this does silence our 
doubters," be added- “But who 
knows? It doesn’t make any differ- 


Conference and the No. 2-seefied 
team in the West Regional, won 12 
of its first 13 games, the only fos 
coming agai nst Kentucky in the 
Maui Classic. But then conference 
play began. The Wildcats lost two 
erf their firet four Pacific-10 games, 
and were only 6-3 after the fiist 
round of games in the conference. 

The second half of conference 


Vr' 




□aments the Wildcats were upset in 
the first round and were ridiculed 


for their early exits. 

Last year, two months after their 
latest failure, Arizona went on a 
three-week trip to Australia and 
New Zealand and played lOexlribi- 


f When you have 
the people as 
critical as we have 
to deal with, it tends 
to get yon to 
circle the wagons 
and yon tend to 
become closer as a 


non games. 

Arizona's coach, Lute Olson, 


and several of his players say the 
trip brought the team closer togeth- 
er and united in focus against op- 


gronp. 

LateOhoOf 
Arizona coach 


B3 Chci'Tbe Awacaxd Prat 

DenrePs Dzkembe Motombo polled down the rebound, hot Mkheal Cage and Seattle got tbe victory. 


jxjnents. other real or imagined. 


Pacers End Drought With a Deluge 


The Associated Press 

Indiana's scoring drought ended 
in a dduge of baskets. 

Reggie Miller bombed from the 


NBA HIGHLIGHTS 


scored in double figures Monday 
night as the Pacers matched their 
best offensive output of the season 
with a 126-93 victory over the visit- 
ing Los Angeles Clippers. 

The Pacers were averaging 87.9 


outside, Rik Smits hit shots from in 
the paint and five other players 


points over the past 12 games. 

127 points to lead all 


Smits scored 
scorers. Miller finished with 22 and 
Haywoodc Workman added 16 


points and nine accicts. Kenny 
Willi ams scored 13 and Dale Davis 
had 10 points and 10 rebounds. 

SuperSonics 111, Nuggets 97: 
Gary Payton scored 23 points and 
Seattle forced 23 turnovers in bear- 
ing visiting Denver. Tbe Sorties shot 
under 40 percent for the third time 
this season, but their defense carried 
them to their fifth straight victory. 


i on and off tbe court. 

"When you have the people as 
critical as we have to deal with, it 
•tends to get you to circle the wag- 
ons and you tend to become doser 
as a group," Olson said after Satur- 
day’s "When we went to 
Australia to play, it was the best 
thing to happen to us, because we 
could get out of that environment 
and have a lot of fun as a group. 

"We came back from that trip 
aware that we\e got to be strong far 
one another. And if we are, we are 
going to be successful Thai trip got 
h going and when guys cam* 
bade to Tucson, from the first day 
you could see the togetherness.” 


ence, because come next Saturday 
there will be only four teams play- 
ing in Charlotte, and we’re one of 
them." 

Sioudanrire and Arizona’s other 
Khalid Reeves, a senior, 
led Arizona to four tourna- 
ment victories in which the Wild- 
cats have controlled the tempo with 
their, fast-break offense and pesky, 
in-your-face defense. 

Arizona scored comfortable vic- 
tories over Loyola, 81-55, then Vir- 
ginia, 71-58, and Louisville, 82-70, 
before putting Missouri in the tank. 
Stoodamrre and Reeves combined 
for 53 points against the Tigers. 

Arizona, winner of the Pacific-lO 


. — California the second week 

in February. Losses dare would 

have made the Wildcats 6-5, a spEt 

would have left them 7-4. But Arizo- 
na blew away both Stanford, 77-60. 
and then CaUf curia, 96-77. 

“After that trip, there was no 
doubt in my mind that these govs 
were on a mission,” Olson said. 

Arizona has lost just once sntu 
then. It was the final game of the 
regular season; against conference 
and intrastate- riral Arizona Stale. 
The loss again cast doubts oven 
Arizona’s readiness for tbe tourna- 
ment. 

But the Wildcats advanced to the 
Final Four for only the second time 
in the school's history. Arizona 
made it to the Final Four in 1988, 
but lost its semifinal match to 
O klahoma. 

This team believes it can go fur- 
ther. 

“This is not a team that will go to 
Charlotte and fed like they’ve ac- 
Qlsonsaid. 


\ gets us one step closer to our 
aTthmfcyooTl seethe 


goal, but I don’ _ . 

team sdf-satisfkd where they are 
now." 

"This team has the best chemis- 
try that we’ve had since the *88 
team,” he said, "and it’s a very 
different team from toe '88 team 
because we didn't have toe 
ness out front that this team 

Olson added, "I think they've got 
a chance to prove that they are 
better, bnt that’s got to be done 
after the next game, not now.” » 


H : 


two assists per game, ! 


-best 


pass. He also averages a little more 
on toe Arkansas team. 

Those were all skills he learned while playing for the Arkansas Wings, 
an Amateur Athletic Union team on which — for one of the few tunes in 
his early career — he wasn’t the biggest player on his team. That honor 
belonged to Richard Scott, now a 6-7, 215-pound power forward at 
Kansas. 

But finesse is not what Coach Nolan Richardson wants and needs from 
Williamson — not when the Razorbacks have sweet shooters such as 
Thurman and pesky defenders such as point guard Corey Beck. 

“Pound for pound, Coriiss Williamson may be the strongest basketball 
player in the world,” Richardson said. ‘Tmnotialkiqg about in this state 
or in this city or in this country. Pm talking about in the world. He is our 
offense inside. He makes everybody else strong.” 

Said 6-11. 260-pound freshman center Darnell Robinson: “He’s a 
distraction for me in toe weight room. He works out with stuff that I 
probably can't even tifL" 

The Arkansas strength coach Don Decker said that, by design, Wil- 
liamson doesn’t weight train the way football players do. 

“But he could weigh 280 in a heartbeat," Decker said. “He could play 
defensive line if he trained that way.” 

But for all that Big Nasty stuff bn the court, he's Big Nicety off the 
court. He usually speaks softly, and acting is among his top interests 
outride of basketball A communications major, he is ntinoring in drama. 

"It’s like a chance to get away from basketball and just ordinary life,” 
he said. "You can go to class and be yourself or you can change 
personalities. You can be a villain, you can be a good gny, you can be a 


SIDELINES 


SCOREBOARD 


Gillooly’s Sentencing Is Delayed 


BASKETBALL 


PORTLAND, Oregon ( AF) — Sentencing for toe figure skater Tonya 
Harding's ex-husband, Jeff GiUooly, has been moved back to July 5. 

Gilkxrfy was to have been sentenced Friday for his role in the attack on 
Harding’s rival, Nancy Kerrigan. But the date was changed Monday to 
allow time for the three others charged in toe attack to have their cases 
resolved. 

GiUooly pleaded guilty to racketeering. As part of a plea agreement, 
prosecutors agreed to recommend he be sentenced to two years in prison 
and fined $100,000. Under Oregon sentencing guidelines, GiUooly would 
have to save 19 months in prism. Under terms of his deal, GiUooly 
agreed to testify against others in toe case. In Oregon, it is routine for 
people who have made such plea bargains to be sentenced after all 
pending court actions against others in the case are completed. 


NBA Standings 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DfVtSfOP 



W L 

Pet 

GB 

x-New York 

49 IT 

-7Z1 

— 

Orlando 

40 28 

361 

9 

Miami 

37 31 

344 

12 

New Jersey 

36 31 

-537 

121ft 

Boston 

24 42 

364 

24 

PhBadelphJa 

21 48 

304 

281ft 

Washington 

If 49 

379 

30 


InAnMa 44 (Vaught 7). Indiana 59 (OJTairts 
UD. Assists Loi Ann 16 (Harper. Jadaon 
i). Indkm 3S (M ch onftcn wj. 

Denver V a S 29— 17 

Seattle 33 33 36 3ft— 111 

D: El Os 10-16 0-« 20, Rogers 6-9 +* IS; 5: 
Kemp 6-17 8-70 20. Parian NW2 3d'2X Re- 
bound*— Denver St ( Mutambo 21 ), Seattle 63 
I Kemp 13). Assists— Denver 24 (Pockft). Seat- 
tle 25 (GUI. Payton. McMillan 6). 


Anaheim 29 42 5 63 ZW 234 

Los Angela 25 39 11 61 266 291 

Edmonton 21 43 12 54 239287 

x-dlncfced ntovoff berm 


BASEBALL 


Major Lo aquo Scores 


HOCKEY 


NHL Standings 


x- Atlanta 

CMCogo 

Oeotond 


Becker Return to Davis Cup Cited 


OKOotte 

Detroit 

Milwaukee 


baby^you can switch over and be a woman.” 


i greatest role, though, has been that of state hero. He grew up in 
Russellville, Arkansas, and has so far fulfilled toe expectations that have 
been placed on him since he was a youngster. 

"I saw him when he was playing for toe Arkansas Wings,” toe 
Michigan coach, Steve Fisher, recalled. “He was toe talk of the state when 
be was 14 years old, and he's continued to get better and better.’’ 

Said Williamson: ‘Tm happy at home. I made the best choice for me, 
for my family. Now, it feds extra great knowing that I’m from the state of 
Arkansas and Tm playing for toe University of Arkansas and Fm going to 
toe Final Four.” 


FRANKFURT (AP) — Boris Becker will return to Germany’s Davis 
Cup team for the quarterfinal match against Spain, toe newspaper Kid 
reported Tuesday. 

“We’ll approach Boris and I have a feeling he will come back," BHd 
quoted Claus Stauder, president of the German Tennis Federation, as 
saying. The Germans are likely to stage the July 15-17 Davis Cup 
quarterfinal in toe small town of Halle, on grass. 

Germany clinched the Davis Cup tide last year without Becker, who 
refused to play. He.also skipped this year’s opening World Group match 
against Austria, which Gennany won, 3-2, in Austria last weekend. 


Central Dhrfsioa 

48 20 J06 

45 24 JS2 

39 30 -MS 

36 32 -52V 

31 36 -463 

19 4» m 

U 50 -265 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 
MMwest Dtvlsiea 
W I. 


Sft 

m 

12 

MVS 

» 

90 


PO 


Jc-Heustan 

x-Scn Antonia 

Utah 

Danvtr 

Minnesota 

Dallas 


48 )0 

49 20 
44 26 
35 33 
19 49 
8 40 

Pactltc Dtvfslaa 


GB 

-714 — 

710 — 

£B 5W 
315 13VS 
779 29VS 

.ill *avs 


EASTERN CONFERENCE 
Atlantic DtvUoa 

W L T «6_GF OA 
x-N.Y. Rangers 46 23 

x-New Jersey 44 21 

Washington 34 32 

Florida 32 31 

PMkxfetofifa 33 36 

N.Y. Islanders 31 35 

Tempo Bay 25 40 

Northeast Dtvfslaa 
x-Montreal 39 2* 13 

x-Ptttsburgh 39 25 13 

x-Bastaa 39 25 12 

Buffalo 39 28 V 

Quebac 30 38 7 

Hartford 24 44 8 

Ottawa 12 56 8 


99 271 2)2 
9V 282 200 
77 241 232 
77 2)4 211 
73 270 288 
71 2S2 2G 
61 201 233 


91 20 230 
91 278 264 
90 256 226 
87 2SS 200 
47 245 258 
56 202 257 
32 178 357 


MONDAY'S RESULTS 

1 4 8-8 

Florida 1 1 3—4 

First Period: F-FHxgaratd 16 (Hough, 
Sknxttand); D-Cavainnl 10 (Gadnor). Second 
Period: F-Fltzgerald 17 (Hough); (Mtogner 
«. DZmolek 1 (Courtnalt Lodyord); D- 
Gaonor25 (QourinaUQavalllnn ; DCourtnan 
20 (McPhse, Evason). Third Period: F-Lawry 
IS (Mel km try); F-Sfcrudkmd is (Hough. Ban- 
ning). Shots an MM: D (an vtmbfeehrwcfcl ft 
11-2—21. F (an Mooo) 94-17-01. 

Ottawa 1 1 M 

Montreal 1 8 3-3 

— First Parted: OMurray I <MoUwota> Oh); 
Maenows 31 (BrlaMfc Damahousse) IppI. 
Second Period: O-Davydov 7 (MoBatte, Mur- 
ray). TMrd Period: NWOlPietra 10 (Dim* 
(ns); M-Ofcma M. Shots a a Boat: O (an 
TUBtiutt) 5-124-2LM (on BnUngtQn)M»4-31 
8 118-1 
8 3 8 1—3 

Second Period: T-Gttmour 27 (darfc. GUI) 
<pp); V-Btire 54 (Brawn. Roaring) (pp)j V- 
Ronnlno24 (Caurtnam (pp).TMnd Period: T- 
QarVri (GUI ). Overtime: V-Craven M (Bure, 
Dldncfc). SMtansaal: T (on WlUtmora) Wit- 
90—29. V (an potvfn) 7-P-KM-SO. 


PRE-SEASON EXHIBITION GAMES 

V 

MQOOCJT* K«3Um 

and matt 8. Houston 3 

New York Mete & Florida 2 

Montreal z Atlanta 0 

PNJadsJpfiio 7. Kansas City 4 

Pittsburgh 10. Minnesota 5 

Texas s. SL Louis 3 

Now York Yankees 8. Las Angeles 4 

Chicago wMfe Sen 5. Boston 0 

Baltimore 4. Taranto 4 

Colorado 4, San Diego 3 

Cal Honda 9. Seattle 3 

Chlqipo Cubs 12. Oakland 2 

San Prandsa 2. Milwaukee 2. tie. 13 bmlhgs 

Cleveland 12. Detroit 9 


TRANSACTIONS 


For the Record 


MaurizioFamiriest of 1 
to have surgery on a slii 
classics and the Tour of Italy. 


S , 29, the 1993 cycling World Cup winner, is 
iisk on Wednesday and will miss the April 
. 


(AFP) 


x-Seattla 

51 17 

■750 

— 

WESTERN CONFERENCE 

x-Ptioenlx 

45 23 

M2 

4 


Central Dtvtstoo 


Portland 

41 3 

S94 

IBft 


W 

L 

T Pts GF GA 

GoUan State 

39 a 

383 

THft 

x -Detroit 

43 

a 

6 

92 317 243 

LA. Lakers 

79 a 

A33 

21VII 

x -Toronto 

40 

25 

12 

92 251 218 

LA. Clippers 

23 43 

368 

a 

x-Daiku 

39 

26 

11 

89 258 06 

Sacramento 

a 45 

338 

2B 

X-5 1. LOub 

36 

30 

9 

81 239 254 

Inched playofl berth 


Chicago 

35 

33 

9 

79 230 214 

MONDAY'S RESULTS 


Winnipeg 

73 

45 

8 

54 227 307 

LA. CBppers 

3$ 3S 

M 16- 98 


Pacific DIvisiaB 


larilena 

34 a 

25 

35-134 

x-COtoary 

37 

Z7 

12 

86 274 238 

LA: WTOdm M2 KM 020. Jackson 5-106-7 16; 1: 

x-Vmcouver 

30 

35 

3 

79 259 248 

Smits 13-17 3d 27, Miner 7-11 33 21 Rebounds- 

San Jose 

a 

33 

15 

71 220 242 


CRICKET 


THIRD TEST 
West lades vs. Engtaed 
4th Day. Teatfay, la PerftetSpaln 
Lunch scare: 

West imSes second Mninsa: 221 -4 


THIRD AND FINAL TEST 
Australia vs Sooth Africa 
Ftnd Day, TVesdav to DurBoASeoM Africa 
Australia Second innings: 277-4 (oven 124) 
Match drawn 


BASKETBALL 

M oMe nal Basketball Association ■ 
NBA— Su sp ended Hakeem Oto)uwavHou» 
ton center, lor 1 game and fined Mm KLSOMor 
making Inten t ional physical contort with ret- 
araa Mil Spooner during Sunday nKArcuam 
at Phoenix. 

CHICAGO— Signed Jo Jo English, guard, 
for remainder of season. 

MINNESOTA— Signed Andrea Gutoert 
center. 

FOOTBALL 

Naftam Football League 
CINCINNATI— Agreed to term# with Don 
rick BriU. OuorU Signed Derrick Brh&afftn- 
■Ivb lineman, to 2-year contract 
INDIANAPOLIS — Released Chip BO*ft 
Ilnobackar. Signed Tony Bennett, llnchodnr. 
to 4-year contract 

MIAMI— Signed Lea Amguz, puntor; R*fr 
gle Brawn, wide receiver; and George Rook* 
defensive tackle. 



< ii 


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SPORTS 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 


Page 17 


f j • ^ 2 Witnesses 
,C S Withdraw 

r_r I 

..... ^ Charges in 
* :Tapie Case 


' Reuters 

■ . VALENOENNES, France — 
Two of the main witnesses in 
‘ ‘Frances soccer bribery scandal 
■TOtndrcw testimony against the 
; . Maraeflle soccer chib owner Ber- 
Tvft *apie dining a confrontation 
More magistrates on Tuesday 

■ sources said. 

Former Marseille midfielder 
Jean- Jacques Eydelie, who has ad- 
mitted giving a 250,000 franc 
•($44,000) bribe to a Vdmriennes 
player, withdrew earlier statements 
' m ^ Tapie tried to put 
. '‘pressure on him to change his testi- 
* . many about the case. 

■ “ • “My client said today that Ber- 
• nard Tapie was never involved in 

" this affair,” Eydelie’s lawyer said. 
Magistrate Bernard Beffy con- 

■ -firmed “there has indeed been a 
•’ change in statements by the player 

■ and I don’t know why." 

" The Valenciennes cinb chair- 
■ ' man, Michel Coeacas, who earlier 
also implicated Tapie in the alleged 
'attempt to bribe Valenciennes to 
lose an important match to Mar- 
sdUe in May, said Tuesday he had 
“only let Tapie know that a bribery 
attempt was under way. 

“ Marseille, the 1993 European 

■ champions, was banned from Eu- 
ropean soccer this season over the 

,.bnbayscandaL 

A triumphant Tapie said after 
"the confrontation mat the truth 
.'.now was emerging. But he re- 
' mained under investigation be- 
“ cause of allegations of involvement 
. in the case made by Valenciennes 
. ^ trainer Boro Primorac. 

. - Tapie was placed under investi- 
gation for suspected fraud and 
forgery in a separate case Saturday, 
.-which dealt with the finances of 
nine soccer dubs, including his. He 
is also under investigation for fraud 
in yet a third case which deals with 
: Tiis private business affairs. 



Arsenal Gains 
Advantage in 
Draw With PSG 



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WRITINGS OF SPRING — Baltimore's Cal Ripken obliging autograph-seekers before an exhibition game against Toronto. Ripken had two RBIs in the 64 victory. 

Johnson Leaves Cowboys in Feud With Owner 


The Associated Press 

IRVING, Texas. — Jimmy Johnson sev- 
ered his tempestuous five-year relationship 
with owner Jozy Janes on Tuesday, leaving 
the Dallas Cowboys and a chance to win an 
unprecedented third straight Super BowL 

“After our discussions, we have mutually 
decided that I would no longer be the head 
football coach of the Dallas Cowboys," 
Johnson said, sitting to the right of Jones at 
(he Cowboys' Valley Ranch headquarters 
after two days of meetings. 

“Personally, it was a time I fdt Hke I 
needed to poll back some,” Johnson said. “I 
fdt I had to be 100 percent totally focused, 
or Tm not going to be into h like I need to bt 
I fdt like I was beginning to lose that focus, 


an H because of Pm no longer wvrh of 
the Dallas Cowboys.” 

Jones said that it was in the best interests 
ot everybody concerned. 

“There are no negatives when you look at 
it," the team owner said, before thanking 
Johnson for his service. 

Their feud began almost as soon as Janes 
bought the team in 1989, fired Tom Landry 
and madft Johnson the c o ac h 

It boiled over last week at the NFL meet- 
ings in Orlando. Florida. After a perceived 
snub by Johnson, Jones suggested in an early 
morning barroom conversation that he 
would fire his coach and replace him with 
former Oklahoma coach Barry Switzer. 


Johnson, infuriated, left the meetings the 
next morning. 

Switzer was one of the possible successors 
along with Notre Dame coach Lou Holtz 
and defensive coordinator Butch Davis. Da- 
vis has never been a head coach at any level 
and has been with Johnson since his days at 
Oklahoma State; but at this late dale he 
would be the most likely successor for rear 
sons of continuity. 

“This boiled down to a personal thing 
between Jimmy and Jerry,” Davis said. “It 
was nothing about football, it was nothing 
about management. This was personal.” 

Many of the differences have stemmed 
from the desire of Jones, Johnson’s team- 


mate at Arkansas in the early 1960s, to be 
known as “a football guy.” Janes said during 
the week preceding the Cowboys’ 30-13 win 
over Buffalo in January that he had the 
ability to coach the team. 

Then, he added fad to the feud by suggest- 
ing this week that there were numerous other 
coaches capable of taking the Cowboys to 
the Super Bowl considering the stockpile of 
talent 

Johnson’s departure, however, may lead to 
the defection of of that talent wySmting 

linebacker Ken Norton, fullback Daryl 
Johnston, wide receiver Alvin Harper and 
offensive linemen Nate Newton and Kevin 
Gogan. 


Compiled by Our Staff From Dispatches 

Arsenal emerged as favorite to 
reach the European Cup Winners" 
Cup final when they hdd Paris-St 
Germain to a 1-1 drew in the first 
leg of their semifinal Tuesday at the 
Fare des Princes stadium in Paris. 

The London side took the lead 
through England international 
striker Ian Wright, who scored his 
31st goal of the season after 35 
minutes. France’s David Ginola 
equalized 15 minutes later. 

Arsenal not only defended reso- 
lutely but also made the better 
chances and they now only need a 
1-0 win, or even a goalless draw, at 
Highbury in two weeks to go 
through to the final on May 4. 

Wright, left out of Arsenal's pre- 
vious two away matches in Europe 
at Standard Liege and Torino, gave 
Arsenal the advantage after the 
English side had battled grimly 
against the expected flying start 
from the French league leaders. 

But after 35 minutes be glanced 
home vrith a excellently taken 
header. 

Brazilian defender Ricardo 
fooled Alan Smith and when Pad 
Davis curled in the free kick, the 
French defenders inexplicably al- 
lowed Wright, Snath and Steve 
Bould to run beyond them. Wright 
applied the final (ouch beyond 
goalkeeper Bernard Lama’s de- 
spairing dive: 

Paris-St Germain replied with a 
barrage of comers and when they 
won a free kick on the right, Gino- 
la’s header was only just off the 

mark 

The Bench team leveled five' 
mmoles after the restart following 
a relentless opening bum in the 
second half. 

A series of comas produced 
soaring headers by Ricardo and 
George Weah, which were both 
desperately dose to finding the net. 


Then, in the 50th minute, Ginola 
hfr the target 

Police detained about 200 peo- 
ple, many of them English fans, 
outride the Parc des Princes before 

the mulch. 

“It was a preventive sweep to 
avoid trouble," a police spokesman 
said. “Most of them were drunk 
and had do tickets anyway.” 

Benfica 2, Parma I: In Lisbon, 
Rrn Costa celebrated his 22d birth- 
day by setting up one goal and 
scoring another as Benfica beat the 
holders of the Cup Winners’ Cpp. 

Costa struck the winner in the 
60th minute to give the Lisbon 
team a narrow advantage for the 
trip to Italy for the second leg. 

A superb piece of skin from the 
midfielder led to Benfica going 
ahead after only seven minutes. 

Costa weaved his way past three 
defenders on the left flank before 
threading a perfectly weighted pass 
for striker Isaias to beat the offside 
trap and finish with a low shot 
from just inride the box. 

With the action flowing from 
end-to-end, Parma equalized six 
mhmtes later after the fonfita de- 
fense failed to clear on the edge of 
their box. The ball was squared to 
the unmarked Gianfranco Zola 
and the Italian midfielder blasted it 
into the net from 16 yards. 

Sabdxug 0, Karlsruhe 0: Casino 
Salzburg failed to capitalize on the 
home-field advantage as they were 
held to a bruising standoff by the 
German ride Karlsruhe in a UEFA 
Cup match that saw seven book- 


But it was the no-nonsense Ger- 
mans who were left berating them- 
selves the loudest after the 0-0 
se mifinal first leg encounter. 

They had five men booked and 
three of them — Russian Valeri 
Schmarov, Gunther Metz and Mi- 
chaal Wittwer — mil miss the re- 
turn kg. (Reuters, AFP) 


tf5;?‘-ea5-eSs»!i 


INTERNATIONAL CLASSIFIED 


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IruemariaaaJ Herald Tribute 

P ARIS — Opes letter to the soccer authori- 
ties in Germany and England: 

Gentlemen, the time has come to acknowl- 
edge that sports cannot be played in a vacuum. 
Surely you sense 

the depth of fed- pob 8f“ a 
ings aroused by - ffj _ 

the forthcoming "“g 1 ” 1 ^ 

anniversary of a 

world war ended 50 years ago? Surely, your 
duty must be to abandon the proposed Germa- 
ny-England soccer game in Berlin? 

It was insensitive to the point of insanity to 
schedule the game on Hitler's birth date, April 
20. It was evident when Hamburg relinquished 
responsibility for the game that the threats of 
neo-Nazi and anti-Nazi extremists will pursue 
this so-called friendly e nc o unt e r as an excuse 
for vile entendiment of their causes. 

How can you think violence will not travel 
from Hamburg to Berlin? How did you officials 
fed it less provactive to move the unwanted 
game to the stadium that Hitler built as a 
showcase for his 1936 Olympic Games? 

We expected better of the German soccer 
federation, known by its initials, DFB. We 
cannot believe your statement that “the DFB is 
not responsible for things that may happen 
outside the stadium.” 

Not responsble? What an odious ring that 
has. The Nazis hid behind such words. 

I do not identify football administrate!* with 
Hitlerian criminality. Yet they are irresponsible 
to ignore history and ignore the new fanaticism. 

You defend your “democratic right” to play 
whoever, whenever friendly nations consent. 
Something simflar was said in May 1938 when, 
in the same Berlin Olympic arena, English and 
German soccer teams stood side by side, giving 
the Nazi salute as a fraternal gesture. 

The war soon followed. Our modem world 
sought, two weeks a go, a symbol of peace in a 
soccer match played in Sarajevo. We all saluted 
that, just as some of us applauded last winter 
when two Irelands, north and south, played a 
World Cup qualifying match in Belfast despite 
the terrorist threat there. . 

The issue that was dear. Belfast lives with 
strife, its security is tested whether or not games 
are played. The calculated risk gave the Irish 
people hope through sport; the signal want out 
that soccer is not available as a propaganda 
platform. 

Berlin on April 20 is an option. The match is 
effectively an exhibition, played for prestige, 


profit and Germany’s World Cop preparation. 

Any other time and place is fine. April 20 is, 
we are told, the only day in the sporting calen- 
dar an which the teams can get together. Pboey! 

Call the thing off. Peruse the letters pages of 
serious newspapers, from The Times of London 
to journals in America, Canada, Belgium, 
France, the Netherlands. The divisions of men 
and women who served in World War II are 
still so emotive that they are outraged at sugges- 
tions that former enemies inarch together on V- 
E Day (May 8) and D-day (June 6). 

Those of us bom after the war can let by- 
gones be bygones because we never experienced 
such horror firsthand. But many members of 
the generation that raised us cannot, will not, 
forgive or forget. 

Nor will they condone an infiammatety, un- 
necessary game in a place and on an anniversa- 


Hamburg opted out of the 
soccer match between 
Germany and England. 
Nuremberg considered it 
and declined. Berlin, for 
reasons of its own politics 
and unrest, feels it can 
exploit the publicity value 
of staging the game. 


ry made tire excuse for splinter groups, right 
and left, to engage in violence. 

Human wounds reopened after half a centu- 
ry run deeper than the scope of sport. But 
sportsmen are members of the human race, and 
should not be asked, certainly not compelled, to 
play a focal part for recruiting thugs to the 
supposed “Battle of the Century” planned by 
neo-Nazis against anarchist leftists. 

Hamburg opted out of the soccer match 
between Germany and England. Nuremberg 
considered it and declined. Berlin, for reasons 
of its own politics and unrest, feds it can 
exploit the publicity value of staging the game. 

Because of this, Berlin has had a foretaste erf 
hooliganism. The offices of the soccer federa- 
tion there were desecrated — windows were 


smashed, smoke bombs thrown in, walls 
daubed with protest graffiti. 

“Security ofidals have told us that hooligans 
from around Europe — England, France, the 
Netherlands — are p lannin g to meet in B erlin 

and take mi right-wing extremists around the 
game,” said Reiner Gentz of the Berlin soccer 
federation. 

But Gentz insists: “We are going on with it 
Switching the game would be a dimb down for 
democracy, the right wingers would come any- 
way. We are planning the necessary security. 

Stop! Sport is not acceptable as a catalyst to 
violence threatening life and limb and civil 
order. The idea poisons the vny concept of 

sporting exchange. 

So please reverse your decision to play this 
unfortunate affair. Allow the Ministry of the 
Interior to disarm the 600 bolder guards and 


edly prestigious hour and a half of play. 

It is not in democracy’s interests to hold an 
event that has been interpreted as an invitation 
to war games. No cinema, no dance hall, no 
theater would remain open in the face of surih a 
dire threat 

April 20 is no longer a friendly soccer date. It 
is the excuse to attach sinister maniq dose to 
war, to sport For the good of Beriin’s citizens, 
the good of soccer and the conscience of your 
official selves, pull the ping on this now. 

Climbing down is never easy. Those who 
cherish sports, who share your assertion that 
soccer is a democratic right agree that the 
fabric erf our way of life and of recreation is 
banned by the dilemma you face. 

But the mistake was yours, the date agreed in 
ignorance. Do not now compound that with 
misplaced pride or stnbbomess, which could 
have lethal consequences. 

Read, and read again, the pamphlets circulat- 
ed in Germany ami beyond, calling for the 
mother of all riots in Bedin on April 20. Think of 
the warning erf a rehearsal threatened by the 
leftists determined to inarch in Berlin on April 9. 

jQjrgen KJeemann, the Bolin minister for 
sports, presumably has weighed all of tins. Yet 
he states, “We know there are risks, but we are 
confident the police can control any problems.” 

Control at what cost, and to what end? One 
death will not be forgiven by drinking people of 
any generation. Do not assume your responsi- 
bility ends at the stadium wails. Abandon, 
gmuemen, while ye may, and while your hands 
are relatively clean. 

Rah Ihtgbcj is m Ac staff of The Tima. 


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Page 18 


INTERNATIONAL HERALD TRIBUNE, WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30, 1994 


OBSERVER 


A Funeral in Phoenix 


Eugene Ionesco’s ‘Theater of Derision’ 


PEOPLE 


By Russell Baker 

N EW YORK — The Demo- 
oats may be brain-dead, but 
the Republicans are now entering 


ibe Robespierre phase of their con- 
servative revolution, which means 
die end is near for them too. 

After that we can all enjoy gov- 
ernment by PAC (shorthand for 
political action committee), a sys- 
tem under which g^n g s of the well- 
to-do^ both corporate and rich, 
pool money to buy congressmen. 

People wbo are not wdl-to-do will 
probably have to join the political 
equivalent of those cockamanrie “al- 
liances" proposed in the Clinton 
health-care biD to reduce the insur- 
ance industry’s power to punish the 
sick, the infirm and the dying. 

I began to suspect the Republi- 
cans were deep into Robespierre 
mode when their last rational con- 
vention, with Ronald Reagan in the 
wings waiting to go on, let Patrick 
B uchanan keep talking until prime 
time ran out 

Here was an entire political party 
on national television, and it bad 
Reagan, the greatest voie-geiter 
since Eisenhower, maybe since 
Franklin Roosevelt, wailing to 
apeak to the whole darn United 
States, and it kept him waiting! And 
waiting and waiting while a newspa- 
per columnist bogged every last 
minute of prime time. 

□ 

This, friends, was evidence of a 
political party with an an instinct for 
the hearse. 

There has been more since. Con- 
sider the sudden rise to eminence of 
that unreconstructed Texas dino- 
saur, Senator PM Gramm, not just 
as chair man of the party’s Senate 
campaign committee, but also as a 
possible presidential candidate. 

What Bella Abzug used to be to 
the Democratic Party, Gramm is to 
the Republican; to wit, a powerful 
instrument for rousing the devout 
and for terrifying the other 90 per- 
cent of political humanity. 

A recent New York Times story 
about the cruel treatment being giv- 
en former Senator Bony Goidwater 
makes h ominously dear that (he 
spirit of Robespierre infests the par- 
ty, making it ripe for cataclysm. 

Goidwater is the father of Repub- 
lican conservatism. He fought the 
impossible campaign of 1964, took a 
terrible baiting from Lyndon John- 
son, and in the process created a 


new enthusiasm among Republi- 
cans for what came to be called 
conservatism. 

What fun Democrats had running 
against him that year! His campaign 

slogan was, “In your heart you know 

he's right" Denwcratsscratcbed out 
the word “right," and wrote in 
“nuts." 

O 

Now, 30 years later, the children 


By Mel Gussow 

New York Times Senior 


E UGENE IONESCO, whose inaava- 
tive plays revolutionized the contem- 


Now, 30 years later, me ctuiaren 
of his revolution are through with 
him. They accuse him of being soft 
on Clinton, soft on homosexuals, 
soft on the abortion issue. They 
want his name taken off the Barry 
Goidwater Center in Phoenix, off 
the high school in Deer Valley, the 
boulevard in Scottsdale, the airport 
wing in Phoenix, the engineering 
center at Arizona State University. 

Robespierre, of course, didn't 
have to send the orig inal makers of 
the French Revolution to the guillo- 
tine. Most of them bad already been 
chopped, or had Ded the country, by 
the time he came to power. 

In his zeal to preserve the revolu- 
tion's purity, however, be used the 
guillotine so tirelessly that eventu- 
ally no one, not even his closest 
allies, felt safe. At the end every- 
body was so scared of losing ms 
head that Robespierre was seized in 
a mass uprising of the terrified 
His jaw was shattered, which 
made it hard to plead his case, and 
before he could do so they dis- 

K ‘ id him with a drop of the 
ami the steam went out of 
the Revolution. 

Revolutionaries who had sur- 
vived had lost the old zest for pack- 
ing Lbe tumbrils with absolutely ev- 
eryone suspected of deviating from 
the orthodoxy of the moment. 

The Republican Party has for 
many years now been loading its 
own into the tumbrils. The offense: 
deviation from the orthodox con- 
servative line. The habit began, 
ironically, at the 1964 convention 
which nominated Goidwater; con- 
servatives who despised Nelson 
Rockefeller mode it almost impos- 
sible for him to speak. 

Since then there has been a long 
list of distinguished Republicans 
shunted out of power positions in 
Congress and even discouraged 
horn continuing in politics. Now it 
is Barry Goldwaler's turn. The 
founder, kaput! The end is surely 
mgfa. 

New York Times Service 


JO tive plays revolutionized the contem- 
porary theater, devastatingly satirized 
modern society while discovering new uses 
of language and theatrical techniques. In- 
spired by sDcnt fibs clowns and vaude- 
ville, he was a playful playwright, clownish 
in his own personality as well as in Ms 
work onstage. 

With outrageous comedy, Ionesco, who 
died in Paris Monday at the age of 84, 
attacked the most serious subjects: blind 
conformity and totalitarianism, despair 
and death. Repeatedly be challenged — 
and accosted — the audience and Ms crit- 
ics. As he said, “The human drama is as 
absurd as it is painful.” 


Along with Samuel Beckett and Jean 
Genet, Ionesco was one of a trinity of 


Genet, Ionesco was one of a trinity of 
pioneering experimental playwrights who 
lived and worked in Paris. Although there 
were thematic bridges among the three, 
Ionesco's distinction was in his fanciful 
surrealism and sense of Dada. 

He had a profound effect on younger 
playwrights, including Tom Stoppard, 
Fernando Arrabal, Edward Albee, Tina 
Howe and Christopher Durang. Ionesco 
was among the playwrights often grouped 
as practitioners of the Theater of the Ab- 
surd He objected to the label, preferring, 
he said, the' Theater of Derision. 

In Ms work, be turned drawing-room 
comedy on its head (“The Bald Soprano"), 
had a stage filled with empty chairs ("The 
Chairs") and transformed man into beast 
(“Rhinoceros”). 

Although his playwriting career did not 
begin until he was 40, he wrote 28 plays as 
well as several books of memoirs. 
Throughout his career, he was an imagina- 
tive iconoclast who could create the most 
bizarre imagery. 

“Rhinoceros," in its 1961 Broadway 
production, proved to be his breakthrough 
play, enriched by Zero Mostefs virtuosic 
performance, in which he transmogrified 
himself from man to rhinoceros without 
altering his makeup or costume. 

Roaring, bellowing, hilarious, Mosld put 
the playwright on the international theatri- 
cal map, and “Rhinoceros" ran for 241 
performances. But the play was only one of 
many that insured Ionesco's stature. 

Despite Ms reputation for controversy, 
he saw hims elf as a preserver of theater, a 
classicist and “a supreme realist" He mast- 
ed that he wrote archetypes, not stereo- 
types. 

As he said in 1938, “I believe that the 
aim of the avant-garde should be to redis- 
cover — not invent — in their purest state, 
the permanent forms and forgotten Ideals 
of the theater.” He added: “I make no 






Playwright Ionesco as “The Bald Soprano” went into its 21st year in Paris. 


Haim to have succeeded in this. But otberc 
will succeed, and show that all truth and 
reality is classical and eternal." 

He was “the Moliire of the 20th centu- 
ry." said Rosette C. Lament, the author of 
“Ionesco’s Imperatives: The Politics of 
Culture" (Michigan University Press, 
1993) and an acknowledged authority on 
Ionesco's work. “Like Molifere in his late 
plays,” she continued, “in Ionesco’s plays, 
there is a seamless amalgam of the comic 
and tragic.” In her eyes, be was a master of 
the “metaphysical farce;" an oxymoron 


that the playwright accepted as accurate. 

Ionesco was born in SlatTna, Romania, 
on Nov. 26, 1909, although he took three 
years off Ms age and claimed 1912 as his 
birth year, presmnably because he wanted 
to have made his name before the age of 
40. His father was Romanian. Ms mother 
French. As a child, he lived in Paris. 

In an article titled “Experience in the 
Theater,” he remembered his introduction 
to a world that would preoccupy him fa - a 
lifetime. The puppet snow in Luxembourg 
Gardens fasonated him as the puppets 


In His Own Manner of Speaking 


New York Times Service 

Here is a sample of Ionesco’s dialogue: 

Mrs. Martin; I can buy a pocketknife for 
my brother, \ but you can’t buy Ireland for 
your grandfatker. 

Mr, Smith : One walks on his feet, but one 
heats with electricity or coal 

Mr. Mania : He who sells an ox today, 
will have an egg tomorrow, : 

Mrs. Smith: In real life, one must look out 
of the window. 


Mrs. Martin: One can sit down on a 
chair, when the chair doesn’t have any. 

Mr. Smith: One must always think of 
everything, 

Mr. Martin: The ceiling is above, the floor 
is below. 

Mrs. Smith: When I say yes. it’s only a 
manner af speaking. 

Mrs. Martin: To each his own. 

— From “The Bald Soprano" (1950) 


“talked, moved, dubbed each other.” It 
was. be said, "the spectacle of the world 
itself . . . presented itsdf to me in an infi- 
nitely amplifie d and caricatured form, as if 
to underime its grotesque and brutal troth." 

“The Bald Soprano” (La Canlatrice 
Qjauve) was inspired by Ms own attempts 

to learn English by using an English- French 
conversational manual. Copying out 
phrases, he xeafized he was relearning obvi- 
ous truths, that there are seven days in a 
week and that the railing is above, the flora' 
below. Carrying that premise to ridiculous, 
word-spinning heights, he wrote Ms first 
play — and no bald soprano appeared 
onstage. An actor improvised those words, 
and Ionesco seized upon them and dunged 
the play’s title from “English Made Easy." 

The play was intended, he said, as “a 
parody of human behavior and therefore a 
parody of theater, too." Presented in 1950 
at the tiny Tb&ttre dc$ Noctambutes in 
Paris, it received some initially hostile re- 
views but became the catapult fra bis ca- 
reer. More than 40 years later, the play is 
g titl running in another theater in Paris. 

“Rhinoceros" brought Mm Ms widest 
public. Jean-Louis Barrault starred in the 
play in Paris and Laurence Olivier in Lon- 
don. But it was the Broadway production, 
directed by Joseph Anthony and starring 
Zero Masted and Eli Wallacn, that brought 
him his greatest celebrity. Mostd later 
starred in an unsuccessful film version of 
the play, directed by Tom O’Hragan. 
“Rhinoceros" and other plays charted the 
progress of Ionesco's Everyman, a charac- 
ter named Berenger. 

Throughout bis life, he said he was 
apolitical, a fact he often disproved in Ms 
plays, especially those in his Later period, 
like “A StroD in the Air," (a cosmic walk 
with reference to World war H and the 
Holocaust) and “Man With Bags,” a play 
about exile, in which a traveler is adrift in 
a world without place names. (Is there life 
without geography?) 

His last play, “Journeys Among the 
Dead" was scheduled to be performed at 
the Guggenheim Museum in 1980 but nev- 
er opened. 

Ionesco also wrote a novel (“The Her- 
mit") and short stories, dramatic theory 
(“Notes and Counter Notes"), memoirs 
and fairy tales for children. He also paint- 
ed and made lithographs; in the 1980s he 
stopped writing plays, and devoted much 
of nts time to painting and exhibiting Ms 
artwork. 

In Ms early 20s, he wrote about Ms 
reasons for wanting to be a writer “To 
allow others to share in the astonishment 
of Bring, the dazzlement of existence, and 
to shout to God and other human beings 
our anguish, letting it be known that we 
were there." 


Japanese Arts Patron 
Moves Into DaJfsSeat , 


Yosofi Kobayaslii, the Japanese 
arts patron, will be inducted into 
the Acadfcmie des Beaux-Ans in 
Paris Wednesday, taking tire seat 
formerly occupied by Salvador 
DaK. Elected an associate member 
of the academy in 1990. Kohayashi 
has been prominent in promoting 
cultural exchanges between France 
and Japan, sponsoring many exhi- 
bitions of French and other West- 
era painters in the principal Japa- 
nese museums, among them shows 
of Fragonard, Matisse, Boucher 
and Monet in the 1980s. 

□ 

CSamm Versace is in New York, 
not to parade his fashion designs 
bat to promote a book he has put 
together about them. The coffee- 
table tome, featuring photographs 
of his fashion creations inter- 
spersed with essays, is called “De- 
signs.” Published by Abbeville 
Press, it has an haute-couture price 
— $67.50. 

O 


il( 0 


ifOir 


.1^' 


The mane of hair is gone and the 
leopard-skin pants are history, but 
David Lee Roth — 39, bakhsh and 
wearing looser dothes — is happy 
to the here and now. “The ’80s woe 
fan while they lasted," said the for- 
mer lead singer fra Van Hriea. 
“Bat it's not something I kmg for. 
It was an expendable time. Now 
and here is where the most chal- 
lenge is for me." 

□ 

Moit Sahl, who rose to fame 
making fan of the administration 
of DwigM D. Eisenhower, does not 
exactly suffer from nostalgia. “The 
'50s were rigid, uptight arid sani- 
tized for your protection,” the co- 
median said in The New York 
Times. “AH I remember was that 
everything good you bad to sneak 
in in a plain brown wrapper," he 
said. He recalled that the first big 
laugh be got at the hungry i, in San 
Francisco, was in 1954, “when the 
Honsc Un-American Activities 
Committee was going after Holly- 
wood. I said, ‘Every time the Rus- 
sians throw someone in jail, we 
throw someone in too, just to show 
them they can’t gel away with it' " 


nmRMnoNAi 

CLASSIFIED 

Appears on Pages 7 & 17 


WEATHER 


CROSSWORD 


Europe 


Forecast tor Thursday through Satraday, as provided by Accu- Weather. 


Cota Dai Sol 
Dutton 


today TMMftcM 

High Low W High Low W 

OF OF OF OF 

1IMM 12/53 pc 21/70 1467 s 
1360 BM6 C 10/50 6/43 c 
9M0 -2/29 pc 14/57 307 pc 

16/61 6/43 s 19*6 I list a 

22/71 11/52 • 20*0 13/55 1 
15/59 6M3 pc 1966 BM8 • 

12/53 7/44 pc 14/57 6/43 ah 

1601 6/46 pc U/55 7M4 c 

12/53 6/43 c 14/57 7/44 a 

7/44 3/37 pc SMB 307 C 

21/70 13/55 a 21/70 1407 a 

11/52 307 Wi 10/50 3/37 c 

9/46 7/44 «h 9/46 403 *1 

20/68 6/46 pc 20/88 10/50 a 

14/57 7/44 ah 15/59 0(43 c 








.-.T-a 


Bwtfwk 

Hongkong 




32/82 26/7* 
26/73 11/82 
20/68 17/62 
32/88 22/71 
31/68 18/06 
13/56 4/39 

16/61 7/44 

3006 34/75 
21/70 17*32 
13/55 104 


UnswonoUy 

Goto 


UnaamaMy 

He* 


Gnw 

17« 

5/41 


1661 

7/44 e 

HWtMd 

-1/31 

■6/22 

rf 

2/35 

■2/29 c 

Wanbul 

12/63 

3/37 

% 

1467 

7«4 a 

Las P*t» 

22/71 

13/55 

■ 

22/71 

1762 * 

LMran 

17/82 

11/52 


1966 

13S5 pc 

London 

16/BI 

S«4B 


1263 

7/44 pc 

MmW 

22/71 

6/48 


22 m 

11/52 ■ 

Mton 

18/M 

7M4 


1966 

9/48 pa 


3/37 

-4/25 

c 

0/32 

-3/27 pc 

Munich 

1661 

5/41 


16/01 

0M3 ah 

Mca 

21/70 

8/46 

R 

i9/as 

11/52 ■ 

Oolo 


-1131 


1060 

-2/29 *J< 

Pokna 

1864 

1263 

s 

1864 

14/57 I 

Prato 

1968 

9/4B 


1661 

BMfl pc 

Pragua 

1162 

5/41 


1263 

5/*1 ah 


367 

1/34 

ah 

6/43 

0/32 o 

Bonw 

21/70 

BM6 

a 

am 

12/63 • 


North America 
The Northeast wfll be cool 
late tfrfs week, but maWy dry 
weather Is expected. A few 
showers and thunderstorms 
wfU cross the Plains Thurs- 
day into Friday. Warm 
weather will remain In the 
west. Phoenix will be dry 
with sunshine, while Los 
Angeles end San FianckRO 
ere mM write sunshine. 


Europe 

Stoimy weather wB contfeiue 
to afteef lbe Brttsh totes and 
the North Sea later this 


Asia 

A bell o( showery weather 
wlfl cover southern China 


week. Winds wifl be strong 
Thursday and Friday and 
soma showers are ilk 


Thursday and Friday. In 
Shantfiai, tain will probably 
arrive Thursday. Betpng and 


some showers are Mkefy. 
After recent mild weather, 
cooler air wB return to west- 
ern Europe Thursday and 
much of central and eastern 
Europe by the weekend. 


AJOkra sine 

CWMTewi 24/7S 

Cwt/ to nr a som 

Harm 22m 

Lagoa 32/88 

Nasot* 24 m 

Twite 23/73 


13/55 * 20/88 14/57 pc 

14/57 a 28/79 15/53 pc 

11/52 a 22/71 12/53 s 

8/40 po 2B/B4 11/52 pc 

28/79 pc 32/89 27160 pc 

9/46 pc 29/79 I3/5B fX 

9/48 • 23/73 13/55 a 


ACROSS 

1 Hazard 
9 Rumor 
t4 Took fo mean 
is Prevention 
dose? 

15 Lousy tips 

17 Be maitred' 

18 ‘A Chows Line" 
song 

is Electrical unit 

20 Couples’s org. 

21 High-pitched 
24 Moon valleys 


27 One of the 
Chaplins 

28 Fineness 

29 Crash sound 
31 Dire 

34 Si Paul's top 

35 See 42-Across 


381964 Berne best 
sell er (and a 
hint to seven 
Other answers 
in this puzzle) 


28 Falls Off 
40D.J. Jazzy Jeff 
Songs 


Solution to Puzzle of March 29 


Seoul w* have <*y. season- 
ably mW weather. Tokyo wfll 


ably mid weather. Tokyo wfll 
have dry weather Thureday. 
A tow showers ant possMe 
Friday. Manfla wfl be warm 
write gome sunshine. 


North America 


SlPWantwg 0/32 -602 ¥ 2/38 409 C 

Stoctton 4/39 -1/31 pc B/48 104 ah 

GMfamcy 19/66 7/44 pc 17/52 8/46 C 

Teton -209 -604 at 2/36 -1/31 c 

Mica 16*1 g/40 C 17*2 1050 a 

Vlma 13/5& 7/44 pc 14*7 7/44 pc 

Vtoraaw 9*48 2/35 pc 11*2 4*9 pc 

ZkxUi 17*2 6/43 po 16*4 BA6 to 


Middle East 


Lathi America 


/nchoroga 

Mania 

Beaton 

Danwr 

aural 

HanoUi 


Today 

Ugh Low W 
CIF OF 


22 m 1568 a 21/70 16*1 pc 
24/76 10/50 a 22/71 10/80 a 


18*4 9/48 * 17*2 SMB • 

10*4 1263 a 17*2 11*2 pc 


Oceania 


32*9 1162 a 9/M 8/48 ■ 

26/79 2068 c 33*1 18*4 a 


Today Ton aw raw _ 

Mph Low W M* Low W 
OF OF OF OF 

Bianco Mac 18*8 1162 c 21/70 9/48 pc 

Caracas 9/64 19*6 pc 9*4 20*8 pc 

Una 9/78 21/70 po 27*0 21/10 pc 

■tadooCty 20/78 1060 pc 28/78 1060 pc 

RbdaJanefeo 29*4 22/71 pc 31*8 23/73 pc 

Santiago 28*9 1366 a 2BAB 1365 a 


Los Angelas 

tod 


23/73 1407 pc 33/73 16*1 a 
23/73 18*1 a 23/73 17*2 a 


Lagamtwuraw. pc-osniy cloudy, c-ctaudy, Bhehowras. Hhw«Sar*Dnna, rroh. sfenow IUrIbs, 
svsnow. Hca. W-Wesffmr. AO maps, foracaata and dan provided by Accu-Woflhar, Inc. e 19M 


□soma aansa ama 
□□bhej asaaa ana 
BtaQcisEiaaasH aaa 
□Bsasa aaaaaaaa 
BH0 oaa ana 
aaaanaaaaaa 
bqej sshse naaaa 
□□□□I □«□□□ aana 
sanaa aaaaa aaaj 
EQaansaanaa 

□sa aaa aaa 
aasaasan aHaaaH 
man mciaaaacjLaaLja 
□□□ EQuaa Batina 
QQQ aaaaa aaaaa 


41 Orders af the 
court 

42 With 35-Across, 
a cleanser 

43 Lean 

44 So-so grade 

49 Hears toff of 

47 Least prevalent 

so Comedian's 
date 

si Wallops 

52 Writer Buruma 

54 Went 
chop-chop? 

5T After-dinner 
drink 

60 Breezing 
through 

■1 Lifeless 

62 Italian summit 

63 Matter tar the 
Federal Trade 
Commission 


1 Butcher's cut of 
meat 

2 Reply to a 
knock 

a East, in Berlin 
4 School org. 


5 Country music's 
Tennessee 
Piowboy 

6 Lacy dress 
{rimming 

7 Judge 
■Track-meet 
measure: Abbr. 
s Amaze 
loFromaulot 
town 

it Nice article 
12 Diamonds 
is Aslan holiday 
14 U.S.N. rank 
20 Computer dot 
220 neofAdlai's 
running mates 
zaToodie-oos 

24 Beef roasts 

25 Princess 

('Don Carlos' 
figure) 

2 * Anwar of Egypt 
sa Nuts 

30 N.L M.V.P.. 

1954 and 1965 

31 Becomes gray 

32 Intriguing group 

33 Uke Uriah Heep 

34 list 

35 Tear 

37 Tine 


30 Jug 
43 George 


47 Style of type 
*8 Twine fiber 


Washington, 4& Flavorsome 

e.g. si Relative of k 


55 Umberto of Italy 
so Be kicky m the 
lottery 


44 Hamah's, e.g. sa Born 
40 Representative 54 Son of Noah 


si Relative of lotto 57 Turn down 
S3 Bam sa Bit af advice 


so Latin I verb 



jim . 


life Fa, 


Puato by rnran Ua» 


.© New York Tones Edited by Will Shortz 


TJavd in a world without borders, time zones 

or language barriers. 


AES' Access Numbers. 

How to can around the world. 

1. Using the chart below, find the country you are calling from. 

2. Dial Ithe corresponding ADS' Access Number. 

A An AIKT English Operator or vi^ prumpr will ask far the phone number you wish to call or connect ran io a 
customer service repres e ntative. 

To receive your free wallet card of ABETis Access Numbers, just dial the access number of 
theccxintryyouVeBiarKlaskfraCustcaiierServioe. 


COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER COUNTRY ACCESS NUMBER 


ASIA/PACIFIC 

Australia 001/ 

cariboaJPBOw* 


faebnd 


0014-881-011 Italy* 

10811 Urctennstcln* 


1-80O-S5O-OQQ Colombia 
172-1011 JCasaRfca** 


Bong Kong 
India# 
Indonesia*' 
Japan* 


018872 Uthnanla* 
800-1111 Luxembourg 


155-00-11 B<-iigi4/y » 

HSafradorito 


000-117 Malta* 

' W8 3ML-10 ' Monaco* 
0039-111 Wwht A ral 

009-11 Norway* 

11* ’Poland** H 


Guatemala* 


0800890-110 


Guyana * " 


Malaytia* 

New Zealand 


Saipan* 
Singapore 
Sri Lanka 
Taiwan* 
Thailand* 


105-H Kn ee l* *- (Moeoonr) 

235-2072 ; 8towkh 

B00-01 11-1 II Spate 


Imagine a world where you can call country to country as easily as you can from home; And 
reac * 1 US. directly from over 125 countries. Converse with someone who doesn’t speak your 

language, since it’s translated instantly. Call your clients at3 am. knowing they’ll get the message in 
3 your voice at a more polite hour. All this is now possible with AESSD 
VwmpmmSSSi T o use these services, dial the AT&T Access Number of the country you’re in and you’ll get all the 
help you need With these Access Numbers and your Aisaf Calling Card, international calling has never been easier. 

If you don’t have an AKT Calling Card or you’d like more information on AT&T global services, just call us using the 
convenient Access Numbers on your right 


EUROPE 


A nn att r * 


Brigham* 
Bulgaria 
Croatia** 
Chech Bep 


Hnlaad* 

France 

Ger many 

Greece* 


<”r» Norway ggOjgg-U 

*£ Tctond**** Q*010-MdOlU 

800-QM1 Pansy al* 05017-1-288 

OOP-911 Bornnie 01-8sa4asi ; 

105-11 . 15S-58H2 

235-2072 : Sto raM a QO-420-bOlOl 

HOO-flllMlI Spate 9004^00-11 

*30-430 OwwMu r 020-79S-611 

0000-10288-0 Sw tiwi l and* 1354)0-11 . 

oMfrOW-am 5E * 05099-0011 

E MIDDLE EAST 

8*14111 Bahrain 800-001 

onwoii Cypbig* oag-gfifio . 

078-1 1-0010' tori 177-100-2727 

00-1800-0010 Kuwait 800-288 

9MMOU Ito fa MftnQMnM) 4264101 

00-420-00101 Saudi Arabia 1-800-100 

aooi-ooio Tmfcey r 004)00-12277' 


— igjjtt* 1 Honduras** 


980-11-0010 

114 

119 

2» 

190 



1» 

95-800-462-4240 


Panama* 

Beru» 

Su riname 

Uruguay 

Venezuela** 


i phw gB Q 


174 

.109 

191- 

156 

000410 

80011-120 


430430 Swri 
0080-102884) Swtt 

0019-991-UU UK. 


9800-10010 


19*4)011 Aigmitea* 
Q13O0Q10 Brite. ’ 


loriatnd** 


008001311 Bolivia* 
oo*4»oooiiii mi 
999-001 rifle 



BgMggtt — CA RIBBEA N 

1554MKU. fod n/ n t— 1-800872-2881 . 

0500850011 Pcnaucto* 1-8008 72-2881 

SOT ' BrtttehVJL 1-000872-2881 

800-001 Cg y° ^ Harris 1-800872-2881 

oapfrttio Grenada* 1-800872-2881 

177-1002727 - Haitr 001-800972-2883 

800288 Oaaaku** 0800872-2881 : 

~ 424-801. Wet h - A ntB 001-800872^-2881 

1-800-100 ■ St-BaVNevto 1-800872-2881 

. 0080012277 * ACTUCA 

AMERICAS Egypt* (Cairo) jjpoatW 

0018002001111 Gabon* Q0a801 

555 G a mble* naive 

_ 0800-1111 SSKiS 

— °“ M ”qg 797-797* 

.Malawi** 101-1992 


555 Gambia* 

0800-1111 Kenya* 
0008010 Ubetfa 

00*4)312' MatorfiT 


AT&T 


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